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Bombshell poll shows increase in support for abolishing the monarchy

10 Mar 2021 2 minutes Read
Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex. Picture by CBS.

A bombshell poll has shown an increase in support for abolishing the monarchy.

The poll, conducted by J.L. Partners on behalf of the Daily Mail, was conducted in the wake of the explosive Meghan and Harry interview with Oprah Winfrey on Monday where allegations of racism within the Royal Family were made.

It showed that 29 per cent of respondents in the UK agreed with the proposition that the monarchy should be abolished, while 50 per cent disagreed, and 14 per cent neither agreed nor disagreed.

This is an increase from 25 per cent in January 2020, when 61 per cent disagreed with the proposition.

Support for abolishing the monarchy was even higher in Wales according to the shock poll, where it was put at 32 per cent.

‘Abolish’ 

According to the data 16 per cent strongly agreed with the proposition that it should be abolished, while 16 per cent slightly agreed, and 7 per cent neither agreed nor disagreed.

Those who slightly disagree that the monarchy should be abolished were put at 5 per cent, while those who strongly disagree came in at 43 per cent. This adds to a total of 48 per cent who don’t believe the monarchy should be abolished.

The poll also suggested that most people in Wales believe that the Harry and Meghan interview has damaged the monarchy.

Respondents were asked, do you think the interview by Harry and Meghan has or has not damaged the monarchy?

According to the poll 58 per cent of respondents in Wales thought it has damaged the monarchy, 35 per cent thought it has not damaged the monarchy, and 7 per cent don’t know.

This compares to 57 per cent of those in the UK as a whole who believe it has damaged the monarchy, while 27 per cent believe it hasn’t and 16 per cent answering don’t know.

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