News

Newly-elected councillor defends wearing swastika t-shirt

30 Jul 2021 3 minutes Read
Rosie Diamond, independent representative for Brynhyfryd, posted a picture on her Facebook profile of herself wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with a swastika in 2019

Hannah Neary, local democracy reporter

A newly-elected town councillor has defended her decision to wear a t-shirt bearing a swastika symbol two years ago.

Rosie Diamond, an independent councillor for Briton Ferry Town Council, posted a photograph to her personal Facebook profile of her wearing a vest emblazoned with a swastika in May 2019.

She said the t-shirt is a “piece of official merchandise” for the punk band the Sex Pistols and was gifted to her when she was 16 years old.

Ms Diamond said she was 17 when the photograph was taken and she is “not associated with Nazism in any way”.

She was elected as a representative for Brynhyfryd on Thursday July 29. She received a total of 101 votes, 17 more than Labour candidate Gareth Rice. The turnout rate was 19% of the electorate.

She said she studied the history of Nazi Germany in school and college and now “completely” understands “the history that the swastika carries and would never display that top”.

“I wore this particular T-shirt maybe 2/3 times before displaying it on my bedroom wall for a few weeks as I thought it was provocative and anti-establishment.

“I don’t even have it anymore. In this context, the swastika has not been used with hate, I wore it only for the reason that it was punk as it was the image I was going for.”

‘Punk movement’ 

“The Punk movement is well known for being anti-authoritarian, promoting diversity and abolishing racism and hate, it’s the bread and butter of the genre. The Sex Pistols have written songs regarding abortion and the monarchy and have no connections to hate or discrimination.

“Their manager, Malcom McLaren was actually Jewish and his partner at the time, famous fashion designer Vivienne Westwood designed this T-shirt in 1977.

“In my opinion, it’s incredibly naive to absorb the image at face value and not do any further research into why the symbol is being used on the shirt.

“I’m not associated with Nazism in any way and I believe the Holocaust is the worst thing to ever happen to humanity.

“I wholeheartedly apologise to anyone I have offended with this T-shirt and would denounce anyone who would believe in what the shirt stood for. I regret ever owning this T-shirt and I was young and wore it for no other reason but because it is the official merchandise of my favourite band.”

The Local Democracy Reporting Service asked Ms Diamond what her main goals will be as a councillor for Briton Ferry. She did not respond.

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Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago

Yawn! 😴 It’s about time people learnt the cultural significance and history of the swastika. Can it be a symbol of hate? Yes, absolutely. Can it be a symbol of positivity? Yes, absolutely. It depends on how it is used, for what purpose and by whom. Buddhists, Hindus and Jains use it to express positive values. (Neo-)Nazis use it to express negative values. Is the girl in this article a (Neo-)Nazi? Possibly. Though she’d have to be a particularly stupid one as given her appearance (at least in the photo), she would have been viewed as an anti-social by the… Read more »

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

All of the above.
Plus it was a nostalgic piece of punk history. Lots of punks wore the swastika to subvert … I dunno, something or other. Everything?

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

I think simply because it causes offence and the thinking being that every deviation from the accepted societal norm (skin colour, sexuality, religion, politics etc.) offends so causing offence is good if that makes sense?

Actually a lot of football ultras do the same thing. Many of them at the heart of the movement aren’t actually fascist, they just adopt fascism deliberately to offend and distance themselves from societal norms. That doesn’t mean a lot of nutters don’t then get drawn to the groups for that reason, nor that I’m condoning it but it is a fact of the movement.

Cath
Cath
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

Ultras are called Ultras because they are Ultranationalist football hooligans. You can’t be an “Ultra” unless you are an ultranationalist. Thats the whole point of it.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  Cath

🤦🤦🤦🤦🤦🤦🤦🤦🤦🤦🤦

The old saying goes “a little knowledge is dangerous…”

…and you are definitely in possession of a little knowledge. 🙄

Go tell the Ultras of Livorno, Pisa, Cosenza, St. Pauli, AEK, Besiktas etc. that they’re ultranationalist and let me know how you get on… 🤪

Ultra has no etymological links with ultranationalism whatsoever.

…and no, they’re not hooligans either. Hooligans are a distinctly “British” phenomena.

But do keep up with your “my Grandad was a good ol’ boy in the Butcher’s Apron Army” drivel… it’s frightfully amusing!!!

Shan Morgain
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

Western society does not use the swastika as eastern cultures do. Some of us do know that for Hindus and Buddhists it’s a symbol of positive power cycles. But to the vast majority in the West it is an entrenched symbol of ghastly cruelty and genocide. To throw its agony in the faces of those who suffered, their children and grandchildren who have inherited their pain, is stupid, ignorant and immature. This young lady does not sound nearly apologetic enough. If her favourite band sold Tshirts promoting child abuse “F… an infant for fun” as a rebellious symbol, would she… Read more »

Glwyo
Glwyo
2 months ago
Reply to  Shan Morgain

Her: “I believe the Holocaust is the worst thing to ever happen to humanity. I wholeheartedly apologise to anyone I have offended with this T-shirt and would denounce anyone who would believe in what the shirt stood for. I regret ever owning this T-shirt”
You: not good enough, grovel harder

Yawn. It’s well overdue that other people’s history stopped burying our present. Noone cares about the consequences of the rise of communism, for some reason the authors of popular culture don’t find it as personally scary. Just one of those mysteries huh.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  Glwyo

And still fewer, yourself included no doubt, rail against the atrocities and countless millions killed by capitalism and “democracy” eh?

Penderyn
Penderyn
2 months ago
Reply to  Glwyo

Communism was created as a stateless anarchist philosophy in the 1800s….Lenin, Stalin, Mao and all the other tyrannical nutters can pretend to be commies…..but the well read understand that state authoritarianism being truly ‘communist’ is an oxymoron…a contradiction in terms

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  Penderyn

Correct. Actual Communism is more in line with Council Communism/Left Communism than Leninist dogma.

John Brooks
John Brooks
2 months ago
Reply to  Penderyn

Karl Marx, the acknowledged ‘creator’ of Communism, wrote polemics against the anarchists.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  John Brooks

Yet described Communism as simply a vehicle towards what can basically be described as anarchism.

Do try harder. 🤦

Barry Pandy
Barry Pandy
2 months ago
Reply to  John Brooks

There are other strands of ‘communism’, ‘socialism’ etc. than just Marxism, so no he isn’t the ‘creator’ of communism at all.

j humphrys
j humphrys
2 months ago
Reply to  Glwyo

It’s like they can’t accept it somehow. I eventually did, but it took a few years
as I so wanted communism, or “socialism” as they used to say. Prague was
the jolt that started the clock ticking. Solzhenitsyn was eventually accepted.

One of my wife’s students in Finland was Russian, and she told my wife
‘I remember one day arriving home from school and telling my parents “Oh, comrade Stalin is such a good man!” My parents told me not to believe all I was taught. I went to bed thinking I had the worst parents in the world!’

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  Shan Morgain

I’m Western, I’m also a Buddhist… does that mean I can use it or will you get offended on behalf of others if I do?

And who gets to decide whether someone is apologetic enough?

Do you also get irate at people wearing poppies cos, y’know, the British Army has committed endless atrocities too? Still does to this day, actually.

Ah… the sheer intolerance of “woke tolerance”.

Cath
Cath
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

You type a lot but you seem to have no grasp on reality. Shouldn’t you be on Facebook?

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  Cath

Come on… give us the ultra means ultranationalist fiasco again! 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

Peter Morgan Barnes
Peter Morgan Barnes
2 months ago
Reply to  Shan Morgain

Bang on.

j humphrys
j humphrys
2 months ago
Reply to  Shan Morgain

There are churches in southern France with swastika motif. Just saying.

Vaughan
Vaughan
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

You’re spot on, AR, about the swastika. It is a breathtaking example of the Arbitrary Nation of the Sign which Saussure never lived to see, ironically. As you point out, for eastern religions and cultures it is a thing of beauty which denotes good and let us also remember the national emblem of our fellow Celts, the Manx. You wonder whether she is a neo-Nazi? I hope not personally. Going on what she say it seems to be a naïve attempt to echo the libertarian and anti-establishment nihilism of the punk era. I could be very wrong though. What does… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  Vaughan

I doubt she’s far right. As I said, if she has any knowledge of history beyond the cursory, she’d know that as a punk, the real Nazis would have viewed her as asocial and persecuted her. Maybe she is far right, and if she is, when she proves it, she should rightly be condemned and challenged. I’m reluctant to define somebody a fascist simply for wearing a t-shirt though.

I mean, should we condemn everyone who ever wore/used a Celtic cross?

Clive Busson
Clive Busson
2 months ago

I’d give her the benefit of the doubt tbh.. At 17 its so easy to do stuff you are unaware of and you probably dont understand its signifigance…

defaid
defaid
2 months ago

I see a swastika on a teeshirt beneath spiked platinum-blonde hair, the first think that comes to mind is Sex Pistols.

I see a swstika on a flag or in a tattoo, the first thing that comes to mind is ‘w**ker’.

Context is essential.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  defaid

Exactly… but shh… don’t tell the woke… they’ll get offended at you not letting them be offended lol.

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

I most definitely consider myself as woke as a white man can be. Yet I have agreed with the vast majority of that you have said. I’ve really enjoyed it. Been a bit hot but all contributors making interesting points. The meaning of “woke” in the sense of recent usage, means being awake to the injustices and inequalities apparent in our society experienced by different groups of citizens. It does not mean hypersensitive offence takers, or Marxist (another term that people who use as a term of abuse don’t seem to understand) When it comes to offence takers, it is… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

My understanding of wokism is the exact opposite to what you said so it’s very interesting to read what you have written, particularly given I credit you with being one of the more sensible posters on here. I have a deep mistrust of wokism. To me it’s white liberalism dressed up in a modern coating and I’m too much a student of Malcolm X to have any faith whatsoever in white liberals. I’m old school left (far left), a Marxist (in the actual sense of the word) and a traditional Republican (of the Irish, not American, variety which probably explains… Read more »

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

I take your point Alan. Regards being “woke” this originally came from black America, to refer to activists campaigning to redress the self evident institutional racism in that country. Then it spread to the black populations of other countries (including UKBIN). Then it spread to other groups (feminist groups and LGBT+ for example). So far so good. But then there was the inevitable clash of ideological, perpetually offended perpetually furious social media justice warriors from both far right and left. The term woke was appropriated by over sensitive (offended on behalf of others) types and was used as an additional… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

You’re actually probably from roughly the same area of that compass as me. I’m about as far to the left of it as it’s possible to go and about halfway down the libertarian quadrant. Rosa Luxemburg is a key figure, perhaps THE key figure alongside Ruairi O’Bradaigh, in my political thinking. I’m also very into and informed by Malcolm X and I have a hunch he would have been turned off by wokism as he spoke frequently against similar trends during his lifetime. A lot of what gets under my skin with wokism is this constant crusade to ban stuff… Read more »

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

I think we agree here on behaviours, but differ only on what to call them. I consider that consensus 👍

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago

Actually, something which came to me…

…I genuinely wonder how many people here and elsewhere who are losing their shít over this, think it’s hip and cool to use Yr Eryr Gwyn and are either oblivious to or don’t care about its history or the reality of the movement which birthed it?

There’s a reason some of us have a great deal of respect for John Jenkins but are very much not into old Cayo and Coslett… Just sayin’…

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

It’s an eternal problem with popular movements that raise amongst the people. They start and grow in numbers as a result of the passionate idealism of their early creators. They are often then deposed or quit as a result of incessant pecking and jockeying for power of darker, more cynical people who want to seize control and superimpose their own ideologies. For recent evidence just look to Yes Cymru leadership bickering. How the Tories stole Brexit from the Kippers by veering even harder right. How Boris stole the Tories by revealing the very worst of his outright racism and uncaring… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

Cayo and Coslett were proto-fascists (who incidentally did absolutely nothing other than run around a field playing Cowboys and Indians). Hence why some of us are deeply uneasy about use of Yr Eryr Gwyn. In terms of “Brexit”, an awful lot of people voted for it because of left wing beliefs. Not all, probably not most, but certainly many. The so-called modern left, I’ll call them woke, has done a huge amount of damage by castigating all of them as ardent right wingers. As for darker, more cynical people superimposing their own ideologies on movements in an Irish context, look… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Alan Reilly
#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

Interesting you should mention the IRA, I was going to raise them in my post. Specifically what happened when with a compromise victory at hand it schismed and ended up fighting against itself, followed by the later rise of the provos.
I will seek out that speech and take a look.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

There was no compromise victory at hand. There can be no compromise when it comes to self-determination. A people’s right to self-determination is absolute and the Irish people have declared their desire to be independent several times throughout history.

Every schism has been the result of the main faction selling out for power and money. It happened with Collins, it happened with the Stickies, it happened with Adams, J118 and the Provos. And the result selling out has brought has always been the same.

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

Fair viewpoint. There have to my mind though been few absolute victories. Peace is generally achieved by Negotiation and compromise Both sides having suffered too great losses to continue (a stalemate or Pyrrhic victory) The first can sometimes result in negotiated advantages later. The second tends to spark up again once the sides have replenished the population ready to sacrifice them all over again for “the grievance” I agree on the reasons for schism though. But I think it’s often caused by our differing opinions written here. One faction thinks compromise is the way, the other thinks continuing the fight… Read more »

Cath
Cath
2 months ago

Ah Punk and the Swastika, it would be just a silly footnote to along dead youth movement…but then, later on, John Lydon (of the Sex Pistols) used racist abuse when he attacked a black recording artist, recently complained about homeless people bringing his property value down, supported Trump, claims to have a deep respect for British armed forces, stood on stages across the U.K. and called Labour voters Nazi’s. So to say that the Swastika is entirely divorced from right-wing nationalism is being disingenuous, especially when we factor in things like the Oi! movement that was born within the Punk… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  Cath

Did your Grandad also blow up people in Ireland, India, Sudan, Kenya, Nigeria, Ceylon, Brunei, Somaliland, Rhodesia, Palestine, Iraq, Oman (the list goes on… and on… and on… right… up… to… the… present… day…) and were he and his chums “scumbags, vile, evil, murderous monsters” whilst doing it or is it OK as long as you’re fighting for “British” fascism?

Seriously… people who fete the British (sic) Army on the one hand and condemn Nazism (and it is absolutely right that Nazism be condemned) on the other want looking at.

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Cath

Cath I hear where you are coming from, I really do. But the despicable actions of Jon Lydon as he became an angry bitter old person (Quite a growth industry right now) have no relevance to a youth subculture in the 1980s whether he was part of it or not. Punk is still going strong. I knew a Jewish punk once, not that long ago. He had a swastika tshirt. He was also very proud of his Jewish heritage and lost some family in the Holocaust. He also as he got older became vocally supportive of the Israeli government’s genocide… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

Exactly. Where I come from the “British” Armed Forces are not thought of in any better a light than the Nazis. Worse actually.

That and the fact that over 75% of German military personnel who died during WWII were killed by the Soviets so the rest were basically the same as street sweepers removing the remaining less than a quarter among themselves.

CJPh
CJPh
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

If the British Army are seen in a worse light than the Nazis where you’re from, I’ll stay well away from wherever that is. The failed Nietzschean endeavors undertaken by Germany, Russia and China in the twentieth century caused the greatest losses of life in the shortest period that mankind has produced since the Mongol Empire. If you think the often awful actions of imperialist forces even approach this level of barbarism and brutality, please inform all holocaust survivors. Please tell those who fled Stalin’s purges. Tell the survivors of the gulag system. Tell the tens of thousands of dissidents… Read more »

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

So to summarise you are saying 1. Well the British Empire wasn’t as bad as some other countries 2. Capitalism good / communism bad Okay:- 1. False moral equivalency. Later countries were not more evil than the British Empire because they had more efficient means of extermination. If the Empire had had those means available, they would certainly have murdered many more millions around the globe than they did 2. Systems are neither inherently good or inherently bad. It is down to those that use them. But capitalism has never murdered people in the name of capitalism? Except perhaps East… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

Don’t tell this utter pigeon who designed and first implemented the concentration camp model the Nazis used, whatever you do… 🤦

CJPh
CJPh
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

Did it ever rise to that level though? Is your claim that it is in fact the British empire that 8s responsible for the holocaust?

Have similar systems been employed since early antiquity? Would any reasonable person condone the imprisonment or ethnic cleansing in colonial era Africa? Would any reasonable person engage in the whataboutist top trumps you do without nuance? Coo…

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

Are you genuinely stupid or are you just trying really hard? The fact is you “Brits” created the concentration camp system. You’ll call it whataboutist top trumps, of course, because it doesn’t sit easily on your Union Jack-clad, blood and thunder, conscience but you “British” have created infinitely more bloodshed and misery across the full extent of the globe than anyone else ever has. The one thing you can say about the Nazis, vile though they were, is they are GONE. “British” murder very much continues up to this very day. Now jog on, be a good little subject of… Read more »

CJPh
CJPh
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

Summerise? More of a strawman building exercise, really. I didn’t start the false equivocations here, I didn’t start the whataboutism. Half the crimes you attribute to capitalism can be more accurately be laid at the feet of religious zealotry, merchantalist overreach, feudalism and imperialism. Capitalism swept most of these aside (with obvious holdouts and exceptions; no system is perfect). Re the British Empire. Should its actions be lionised or glorified? I’m a Cymro – obviously not. But did I claim the efficiency of the other regimes was what seperted them morally? No, it was the actions themselves, the intentionality that… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

The Empire fell because the “natives” kicked you “Brits” out.

Dear God, you really did get brainwashed in school, didn’t you? I suppose, to you, the “British” took over the Empire when those countries needed “civilising” and left as soon as the “natives” asked them.

As for capitalism sweeping bad things aside, how is the Middle East faring under capitalist interests?

Maybe if you were from a country which had suffered under capitalism and Empire, you wouldn’t be so ignorant and buck stupid.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

“This is whataboutery”… ah… the classic cry of those who feel good about their history of oppressing and persecuting others and want to get their rocks off on it but want to condemn others for doing the same.

In more traditional language, it’s known as hypocrisy.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

“Will you denounce Hamas?” Ah the classic “persecution of Jews… bbbaaaddd… persecution of Muslims… gggooooooddd”… Zionist/Islamophobic trope. 🤦 I think we’ve discovered why a couple of people are getting so worked up here, folks! Don’t get them started on “Sharia” or “grooming gangs”, whatever you do. 🤦 How about Israhell stops treating Palestinians like shîte, then we can start on Hamas? The fact you threw Iran into the mix rather than Saudi Arabia says all anyone needs to know about you. Saudi funds and trains (didn’t create though, it was you “Brits” with the Americans who did that) Daesh, Al… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Alan Reilly
#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

No I disagree. All of the crimes are attributable to capitalism. Religious zealotry was not a facto here whilst merchantalist overreach, feudalism and imperialism are very definitely subsets of capitalism. I built no straw men, I made no false equivocations, and used no whataboutery. Whilst this discussion is a bit hot, we probably agree on a great many things. I do find denounce a bit of a dramatic term, but I certainly would not praise CCCP or Hamas or indeed the religious revolutionary zealots that oppress Iran. But in secular Iran’s case there is added nuance here, since they are… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by #1Chris
CJPh
CJPh
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

Yeah, this is the problem with the written word – I try not to regard these sorts of exchanges as getting ‘hot’ (unless bizarre claims of me being somehow in favour of the British Empire, claiming my Welsh medium education brainwashed me into supporting, uh, imperialism? I’m not sure what else I could so to demonstrate my disdain to the current status quo beyond my unwavering support for the emancipation of my nation. I’ve stopped engaging with that individual). I’m sure you’re a good person, nothing you’ve written demonstrates otherwise and I truly appreciate the appeal for calmer discourse. I… Read more »

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

i found that an enlightening post indeed. We probably still have one or two points of disagreement, but I appreciate the discussion and there’s lots of new info you have given me to unpack. As regards me being a good person, thank you, but online especially I can be a bit Jekyll and Hyde. Trying to be better, but as a result I often enjoy a bit of heat in discussion. The adrenaline motivates people to organise their thoughts better and can improve their argument. And yes, this was a non-story about a young councillor with a 1980s nostalgia thing… Read more »

CJPh
CJPh
2 months ago
Reply to  #1Chris

Diolch i ti. I fully accept and appreciate your differing views, and will consider and read up further on them – given the candor with which they were delivered.

Right ‘en, i faes y gad a ni te – see you there!

Last edited 2 months ago by CJPh
Barry Pandy
Barry Pandy
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

I agree with Alan, the Empire fell because the “natives”, kicked us out. The British empire (along with all of the other European empires) did not go quietly. If you don’t believe this read up on the Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya and the brutal methods the British rulers used to suppress it – and this is just ONE example of the brutality of British rule post-World War 2. The numbers we killed during the Mau Mau rebellion are nowhere near as high as the Holocaust but that misses the point. As one of my history lecturers pointed out don’t… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

Capitalists don’t drag dissenters from their beds? The British Army won’t go after those who oppose it? Capitalism doesn’t target ethnic groups? It’s done all of those things and more, and continues to do so, right where I live. Literally across a tiny stretch of water from where you presumably do (and countless other locations). Why don’t you come back when you’ve studied a little beyond key stage two? You’re parroting what you were taught in school by the “British” system, not what you’ve learnt and found out for yourself. A good starting point, given your rant about internment without… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Alan Reilly
CJPh
CJPh
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

Neither of my grandfather served. The extended family of one of my grandfathers died in gas chambers in Poland, the others froze to death in Siberia (with 2 escaping to the States). One would imagine that an historically conscious Irishman would recognise the same brutalities met out upon their forefathers in the other tragedies of the twentieth century, but clearly suffering is the sole commodity reserved by those who have not experienced it. I hold no love for the institutions of the UK, and wish to see them dissolved. I want freedom from this system. But to claim that either… Read more »

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

Depends on perspective, which seems to be beyond you. The Nazis did very little to nothing in my country. You “Brits” have done a hell of a lot here… including reducing the population from a point which it still hasn’t recovered to getting on for two centuries later. If your relatives were in Auschwitz, undoubtedly the Nazis are worse in your worldview. If your relatives were some of the many raped and murdered by “British” soldiers, or starved to death in man-made famines, it’s reasonable to suggest the b@stard’s army are worse in your worldview. And you talk about nuance…… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Alan Reilly
CJPh
CJPh
2 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly

You know nothing about me yet make sweeping statements as to my motives and proclivities as to my wish for national emancipation. Your statements regarding my education show an incredible ignorance as to what Welsh medium education is like. You assumed I came from some sort of military background. You ignore the lack of support I have shown for the institutions you choose to reserve a special enmity for. You clearly rank-order based on political/ideological bias rather than a deeper, actuarial view of any given historical event. You place your dog in fights that are not your own and claim… Read more »

j humphrys
j humphrys
2 months ago
Reply to  CJPh

I think most reasonable people will accept that.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
2 months ago
Reply to  j humphrys

Probably because “Brit” history has been whitewashed to nausea.

Exchange “reasonable” for “brainwashed” and I think your sentence would work better.

j humphrys
j humphrys
2 months ago
Reply to  Cath

Interesting.

CapM
CapM
2 months ago

Did this photo get circulated around Briton Ferry in the run up to the election on July 29th. If not Gareth Rice, losing Labour candidate (by 17 votes) is shutting the door after the (ex)Punk has bolted (been elected).

Steve Duggan
Steve Duggan
2 months ago

As many of the comments state here – the symbol has been associated with good and bad elements. To purely associate it with just the bad everytime it is seen is jumping to conclusions. Let’s gather all the facts first then pass judgement.

Last edited 2 months ago by Steve Duggan
arthur owen
2 months ago

It says a lot about the readers of this site that this non-story has attracted the larges number of comments I have ever seen here. Sorry for being pompous.

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  arthur owen

Yes. It says that knowledge and interests are varied and that it has stimulated a lively debate that I have very much enjoyed and learned from.
I agree it is a non-story, but what rich debate followed. Heated, but rich.

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
2 months ago

Was she really wearing this in 2019? All those pop posters, Lemmy/Motorhead, The Jam, Madness, The Damned. She seems a fan of 1970s pop. My first thought was it must be an old picture and she’s now a ‘sensible’ forty something trying to prove she was once a rebel. However, the Extinction Rebellion poster behind her shows this picture is quite recent, as Extinction Rebellion was only founded in May 2018. I don’t doubt her assertion she isn’t a nazi. Certainly less likely than a certain ex Royal pictured in a Nazi uniform a few years ago! Sounds like her… Read more »

Vaughan
Vaughan
2 months ago
Reply to  Huw Davies

Or Rule Briton Ferry!

CJPh
CJPh
2 months ago
Reply to  Vaughan

She seems like she’s going to bring some real energy to the second debate on bin placement or where dog-friendly areas should be in the park. Kinda makes me want to move to Briton Fer.. Couldn’t finish that sentence. 😉

#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Huw Davies

I checked out the Briton Ferry town council website and Ms Diamond will add much needed youth and vigour. She will actually bring the average age of council members down to under 65. Just.
and her interest in the 1980s will give her something to talk with them about. As we know, older people like to talk about things they remember from their younger days (or even just things that they remember)

Last edited 2 months ago by #1Chris
John Neanda
John Neanda
2 months ago

I just signed up so I could comment on this. The shocker headline has nothing to do with what she said about the t-shirt she wore when 17, she hasn’t defended it and she apologised for any offence. And I know the DESTROY T-shirt, anyone can google it, it refers to DESTROYING Monarchies, Religion, and Facism, not supporting it. Glad I’m never coming back to this site again, it’s pure political bias written by the angry losing parties because she’s 19, independent, and beat them. I’m going follow her career and I’ve a good feeling she’s going to do the… Read more »

John Neanda
John Neanda
2 months ago

The Mirror headline is more appropriate “Teenage councillor apologises for wearing T-shirt emblazoned with Nazi swastika”, and they’re usually the ones in for shocker headlines.

This is so obviously political in nature, and having to dig through her 2 year old facebook posts to find something. It’s so obvious that it’s the nasty acts of the losing party. I’m so glad someone like her has been voted in, and I believe she’s going to go far as long she doesn’t get corrupted like the rest of them.

Hellfire
Hellfire
2 months ago

Thank goodness nobody noticed the fez on her bedstead..replacing the turban in post Ottoman Empire modernisation then banned by Ataturk s modernisation..then donned by the 12th SS handschar modernisation and Tommy Cooper.. so I’d like to apologise On behalf of miss Diomond that she was 17 and didn’t realise that the outrage fez warning would present to the electorate of Briton ferry….

Hellfire
Hellfire
2 months ago

I have blown the image up and discovered a rabbit adult aid on the right hand side of miss diamonds dressing table.. I’d would like to apologise on rosies behalf that any offence to the electorate of Briton ferry and assure all that no animals were harmed in the making of this farce..x..

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