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Welsh devolution has ‘not sated’ demand for more autonomy, Tory MP complains

11 Oct 2021 3 minutes Read
Karen Bradley MP Credit: Jay Allen. Copyright: Crown Copyright (CC 2.0)

Welsh devolution has “not sated the demand for greater autonomy” from Westminster, a Tory MP has complained.

Former Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Karen Bradley suggested that the creation of “devolved institutions in Wales and Scotland”, has led to “driven the demand for more” autonomy instead.

The MP for Staffordshire Moorlands also suggested that the “relevance” of the union was being “seriously challenged”.

She made the comments an essay for Strength in Union, in which she argued against the countries of the UK becoming independent nation states.

Bradley said: “The value of the Union of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is under intense scrutiny – and its relevance in the 21st century is being seriously challenged.

“Far from settling the matter ‘for a generation’, the Scottish independence referendum of 2014 has motivated those who would wish to see the end of the Union.

“The creation of the devolved institutions in Wales and Scotland and the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement, agreeing to power-sharing arrangements in Northern Ireland in the late 1990s, has, perhaps predictably, not sated the demand for greater autonomy but driven the demand for more.”

She also suggested that the loss of Welsh troops “would diminish” the “military capabilities” of England.

The Tory politician asked “what would happen to foreign policy if the Union were to break up”, and concluded that “British international influence would be diluted”.

‘Let us consider’ 

She said: “Let us consider, for the sake of argument, what would happen to foreign policy if the Union were to break up into its constituent nation states.

“Undoubtedly, British international influence would be diluted. Who would the world recognise as the successor state of the UK – the state with the right to inherit the former UK’s formal claims and capabilities?

“While England would remain in the world’s top 10 economies in terms of GDP, its military capabilities would be diminished with the loss of the Scottish, Welsh and Ulster regiments and the important submarine base at Faslane, which is of such vital importance to our nuclear deterrent, not to mention our ability to monitor Russian naval and air activities in the Greenland–Iceland–UK Gap.

“Which, if any, of the four newly emerged and clearly defined political units would claim the UK’s veto power on the UN Security Council? I am certain that there are other countries, like India, who may feel far more entitled to a seat than England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland alone.

“We have a duty, to those in need internationally, and to our compatriots, to take an active role in meeting our global commitments and leading the world. We are best placed to do this as one Global Britain, not four separate nations.”

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Tabor
Tabor
1 month ago

Load of John Bull .

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
1 month ago

“We have a duty to those in need internationally” !

If you believe that you are in the wrong party…

Welsh_Sion
Welsh_Sion
1 month ago
Reply to  Mab Meirion

This from the Party that slashed international aid recently.

Two-faced doesn’t say enough.

Gareth
Gareth
1 month ago
Reply to  Mab Meirion

You are right there, how much foreign aid have they cut recently, to those most in need.

Sion Cwilt
Sion Cwilt
1 month ago

I’m not sure what to say to these numpties who suddenly aghast at the realisation that the limited control that devolution has given the people of Wales has led to a desire for control over more aspects of government activity that affects our lives. For some of us, those who campaigned for devolved government, there was always a desire that the responsibilities of the Welsh Government would grow, hopefully culminating in full independence. In the early days of devolution in Wales Westminster had little to worry about given that the Assembly had powers similar to those of a super county… Read more »

Valerie Matthews
Valerie Matthews
1 month ago

When the Westminster Government AND Welsh Tory MPs treat Wales as equally due the same consideration and respect as England, mostly the South , Then Wales will feel content to be part of the Union . I cannot see that happening under the current Westminster Administration.

Grayham Jones
1 month ago

The people of wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 have got to start fighting for your children and grandchildren future in wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 and stop being little Englanders and and be proud to be welsh start fighting for a new wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

Grayham Jones
1 month ago

The older people in wales have let wales down by still voting for English party’s in wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 kick all English party’s out of wales that’s the Tories Labour and all Brexit party’s start fighting for your children and grandchildren future in wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

Erisian
Erisian
1 month ago
Reply to  Grayham Jones

Speak for yourself young man. Some, perhaps but far from all, and I deeply resent your ageist attitude. Got anything to say on behalf of Women or any other groups you are not a member of?

Harry
Harry
1 month ago
Reply to  Grayham Jones

That’s right, reject rule by Westminster and accept totalitarian control by the Global EU, 😂😂😂

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 month ago

Autonomy into the dustbin of history.

All in Cymru, unite to the centre for independence.

Put aside Left and Right until we achieve our goal.

Quornby
Quornby
1 month ago

British International influence???? That ended in 1956. These tory women all seem to be living in a parallel universe that reminds them of the Raj.

R W
R W
1 month ago
Reply to  Quornby

I think that applies to Tory men as well.

Steve Duggan
Steve Duggan
1 month ago

I disagree, we can still meet our global commitments – as you put it – working very closely together as independent countries. We do not have to be under the control of London. Global Britain is a right wing fantasy by politicians still living in the 19th century.

Robert Williams
Robert Williams
1 month ago

Is this expert on devolution the same Karen Bradley who, on becoming Secretary of State for NI said she didn’t know that Unionists vote for Unionist parties and Republicans for Republican ones?

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
1 month ago

Missus, you know damned well who would be the successor state of the UK, and who would have the Security Council veto, so stop pretending otherwise. And what’s to stop you building yourselves a new submarine base, or continuing to use Scotland’s if they consent to it?

So far, these essays pleading for the maintenance of the union have offered no justification for its maintenance that highlights the advantages for the Celtic countries, other than a recurrent, unconvincing and unfounded assertion that “we’re better off together”. It’ll take more than that.

Erisian
Erisian
1 month ago

She seems to assume the indepedant Nations would not be in a Supra National defense agreement. I expect she just wanted to get on the bandwagon but couldn’t be bothered to write another fastuous essay about the ‘Union’

Dafydd
Dafydd
1 month ago

“While England would remain in the world’s top 10 economies in terms of GDP, its military capabilities would be diminished with the loss of the Scottish, Welsh and Ulster regiments and the important submarine base at Faslane, which is of such vital importance to our nuclear deterrent, not to mention our ability to monitor Russian naval and air activities in the Greenland–Iceland–UK Gap.”

I rest my case – perfectly underlines their mindset that they believe we are their property……!

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