News

Welsh Gov announces pay rise for NHS staff – but UK Treasury might not help fund it

21 Jul 2021 2 minutes Read
Health Minister Eluned Morgan at Hywel Dda

The Welsh Government has agreed a 3% pay rise for all NHS staff, but the UK Treasury hasn’t said if it will help fund it.

Health Minister Eluned Morgan has announced that she accepted the recommendations of the pay review bodies in full, despite the UK Government not providing any information about whether any it will provide any additional funding to cover the cost.

She says current budgets will be prioritised to enable the pay deal. The uplift in pay is above the 1% cap previously announced.

The recommendations from the NHS Pay Review Body and the Doctors and Dentist Review Body apply to staff on what are called Agenda for Change terms and conditions.

This includes employed nurses, cleaners, porters and health support workers. It also applies to consultants, doctors in training, pre-2021 speciality and associate specialist (SAS) doctor contracts, salaried GPs and dentists. The pay rise will apply retrospectively from April 2021.

‘Enormous pressure’ 

Health Minister Eluned Morgan said: “Once again, I want to thank our Welsh NHS staff for their extraordinary efforts over the course of this pandemic. Many staff have worked extremely long hours under enormous pressure.

“This pay rise recognises the dedication and commitment of hardworking NHS staff and the enormous contribution they have made. It is also a recognition of how valued they are by Welsh communities.

“For our lowest paid staff, this means we have gone above the Living Wage recommendation of £9.50 an hour, demonstrating our commitment to NHS Wales being a Living Wage employer.”

The pay increase will be made in addition to the NHS and social care bonus payment which was announced by the previous Minister for Health and Social Services Vaughan Gething in March 2021. The one off payment of £735 acknowledged the compassionate care provided by our NHS workforce to the people of Wales when we have been at our most vulnerable.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
7 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Neil Anderson
Neil Anderson
2 months ago

With real independence and our own currency, paying decent wages to everyone would not be a problem. Even as a colony, we could introduce a supplementary internal currency that would help.

In England, politicians play politics with economic statistics that can be manipulated to show that it cannot afford to maintain foreign aid levels but can afford Trident and more nuclear weapons!

Through the looking glass stuff. Don’t believe a word of it.

Quornby
Quornby
2 months ago

The Scottish goverment offer is 4%. 0 8

Richard Y Cymro
Richard Y Cymro
1 month ago

Oh, to have the Tory Magic Money Tree. Where the Conservatives can print money with its quantitative easing, and with a shake of their golden bush, can make £106 billion appear from nowhere to fund HS2 under the premise that it’s “beneficial to Britain” , oh and they’ve also classed it as an England & Wales project which means Wales is robbed of £500 million in Barnett consequentials. Funny, they can find billions more for other English gratuity projects like Heathrow, Hinckley Point, HS1 in London, Spaceports in Cornwall etc… , where Wales only has its already squeezed Welsh block… Read more »

Mandi A
Mandi A
1 month ago

Don’t forget the tunnel to Ireland with its magic roundabout underneath the Isle of Sodor.

Bruce
Bruce
1 month ago

I wonder if this is the same magic money tree that Jeremy Corbyn was going to use.

Mark
Mark
1 month ago

any sovereign government can create money with just a few clicks on a keyboard,

Chris
Chris
1 month ago

Interesting the Tory elitists in Westminster have u-turned on their previous “1% and they should be grateful” now, yet this article suggests that UK Treasury “might not” honour the agreement to fund it? You just can’t trust a Yoon

Our Supporters

All information provided to Nation.Cymru will be handled sensitively and within the boundaries of the Data Protection Act 2018.