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Westminster cedes 70 miles of English territory to ‘Greater Wales’ in petition blunder

15 Sep 2021 2 minutes Read
The River Severn runs through Worcester. Picture by David Merrett (CC BY 2.0).

Westminster may have just ceded Shrewsbury, Worcester, Hereford and Gloucester to Wales.

A petition submitted to the parliament about pollution in the catchment areas of the rivers Severn and Wye has been rejected on the basis that they are ‘Wales’ responsibility’.

Both rivers rise in Wales but the Severn runs through Shropshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire, while the Wye forms part of the border between the two countries.

The now reopened petition from Mark Cheetham called on the UK Government to control pollution from agriculture in the Wye and Severn River Catchments.

Environmental activist and author George Monbiot picked up on the rejection, calling it “astonishing”.

“A petition about the pollution of the Wye and Severn catchments has been rejected by Westminster on the grounds that they are the sole responsibility of the Welsh government,” he said.

“Could someone lend the officials at the UK Parliament a map?

“While I fully support the territorial claims of Greater Wales, unlike our parliamentary officials I can’t deny the current location of the border.”

‘Secession’

The River Severn catchment area runs as far as Coventry and Rugby, extending the Welsh border eastwards by as much as 75 miles.

The Westminster Petition Committee’s mistake caused much mirth on social media, with one user declaring “Congratulations to those who live in Gloucestershire and Herefordshire who now come under the jurisdiction of the Welsh Government.”

“This is an opportunity. It is obvious that they have ceded all control of land, water and resources and the Senedd must promptly act to secure their exclusive sovereignty,” Paul Egell-Johnson said.

“Westminster concedes a large portion of England to Wales, increasing the Welsh tax paying population by 69%,” Rory Bhandari said.

“With Scotland’s impending secession, it seems the Normans and Anglo-Saxons are retreating back to Roman lines.”

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William Glyn THOMAS
William Glyn THOMAS
1 month ago

Perhaps they reflect the mood of the population of the border area. Give them a referendum to see which country they would prefer to be governed by. I’m sure the results would be most enlightening.

Shan Morgain
1 month ago

I wish

hdavies15
hdavies15
1 month ago

Means nothing other than confirmation that the Westminster mob are a bunch of bunglers who evade any kind of responsibility or accountability.

John Rogers
John Rogers
1 month ago
Reply to  hdavies15

And know nothing of the history and geography of the two countries.

Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
1 month ago
Reply to  John Rogers

Was Welsh speaking one

Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephen Owen

Once not one

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephen Owen

I went to B’ham airport the other day and drove past Pencraig, on the borders of Hereford and Gloucestershire! Then you see nearby places named Llangarron and Llangrove, Llancloudy, Llandinabo and you realise how much Wales has shrunk.

m powell
m powell
1 month ago

Are they returning the cantref of Ergyng?

G.A. Williams
G.A. Williams
1 month ago

Glyndwr’s Tripartite Indenture (1405) enacted at last!

Geoffrey ap.
Geoffrey ap.
1 month ago

Hereford is in Wales, look at the mappa mundi and the city charter off 1189.

Jeff33
Jeff33
1 month ago
Reply to  Geoffrey ap.

Ti’n mewddwl Henffordd :-}

Grayham Jones
1 month ago

They was part of wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 once

Kerry Davies
Kerry Davies
1 month ago

Coventry and Rugby maybe but if they give us Nuneaton I am leaving.

Y Cymro
Y Cymro
1 month ago

This is the first time Westminster & Whitehall have willing given Wales something back. Normally they take with impunity. But why are we surprised? After all, the whole of England was once Welsh territory. Welsh Kingdoms existed throughout what is now England. The evidence. There were Welsh Kingdoms like, Rhedeg, Ergyng, Pengwern, Elmet, Deira and so on etc…. And after Saxon incursions, were consumed & assimilated Cantref by Cantref, hence why England is called Lloegr today, meaning ‘Lost Lands’ in Hen Cymraeg. And where we called ourselves Cymry, the Saxons/English deemed us foreigners. In my opinion, a national slight that… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Y Cymro
Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
1 month ago
Reply to  Y Cymro

Should be taught through the whole of Britain, especially from in Cymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

Roderick FARR
1 month ago
Reply to  Y Cymro

Excellent article from Y Cymro. Living in Cumbria (Cymru?),all my neigbors have heard of King Davmail,the last ‘King of Cumbria’, but few know what language he spoke.As late as the 10th Century Strathclyde extended right down to the River Derwent ( which drains into the sea at Workington),where Welsh was spoken throughout.The Vikings weakened Strathclyde allowing the calculating English to finish off the job,killing our Welsh- speaking King Davmail in a catastrophic battle round about 950 A.D. Roughly a century later,after the glorious victory of Welsh-speaking Bretons with Normans and Flemings at Hastings,1066, one of the first laws King William… Read more »

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
1 month ago
Reply to  Roderick FARR

And of course, some of the sheep farmers in the North still count their flock in the old way. I saw a clip on TV and did a double take because it sounded like the farmer was counting in a sort of Welsh!

defaid
defaid
1 month ago
Reply to  Y Cymro

Did you know the Valais is derived from the same Saxon word, as is Włochy, the Polish name for Italy?

I’ve often wondered about attestation for ‘Cymru’ being derived from cymrodorion, never found any, and have taken to fancying (with absolutely no evidence) that Cymru shares an origin with the Gaelic name for Applecross — A’Chomraich meaning sanctuary.

Something in that similarity appeals to me, particularly if we became Cymry rather than Prydeinwyr as our territory shrank and we retreated to rugged fastnesses here and in the old north.

Last edited 1 month ago by defaid
defaid
defaid
1 month ago
Reply to  defaid

I am happy to concede that it’s probable the Gaelic is also derived from the Latin and that sanctuary in Gaelic originally indicated a place where compatriots gathered but I can’t convince myself that Britons would have called their territory Cymru until it was considerably less than half the island. Up to that point there would have been no need to rename native-held land and logically the occupied territory would have had some newer name.

It’s a great pity that so many private libraries have been lost over the centuries.

defaid
defaid
1 month ago

Let’s move the Senedd to Pengwern.

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 month ago
Reply to  defaid

I much prefer the Dee to Severn as the border, preferably with our renewed border forest just beyond that. No foreign entanglements!

Chris Cooke
Chris Cooke
1 month ago

Im sure there would be quite a few residents in the areas mentioned that would prefer to listen to the largely sensible, fair and honest Welsh Gov over the scattergun. deceitful Victorian throwbacks currently overseeing things at Westminster

Dr Stephen Nightingale
Dr Stephen Nightingale
1 month ago

Not going to be much left of Littler Anglia after the 6 Northern Counties bunk in with Scotland: that’s Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cumberland, Westmorland, Durham and Northumberland. Cause we can sure relate to anyone in Melrose or Crieff better than that crowd in Westminster.

John Alverton
John Alverton
1 month ago

Is this actually real? Is this going to actually give more territory to Wales?

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