Culture

Mural unveiled to celebrate past of town which played key role in Welsh industrial history

13 Jul 2021 2 minutes Read
The mural in Bethesda visited by Sian Gwenllian and Rheinallt Puw

A mural has been unveiled in Bethesda that documents the town’s cultural and industrial past.

The mural in the Gwynedd town depicts events including the Penrhyn strike – the longest industrial dispute in British history. It also celebrates Un Nos Ola Leuad by Caradog Prichard, considered by many to be the best novel in the Welsh language, which is set in the town.

The mural, painted by Darren Evans, is part of Bethesda’s Bicentenary celebrations, Partneriaeth Ogwen’s latest community project which celebrates the 200th anniversary of Capel Bethesda in the town.

It has been painted on the side of a building in Tan Twr, and celebrates the community’s cultural and industrial past.

The mural was funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund to coincide with the area’s bid to become an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Following its recent completion, the mural was visited by Siân Gwenllian, the local Member of the Senedd, accompanied by Cllr. Rheinallt Puw, the councillor for the Ogwen ward on Gwynedd Council.

The town’s Senedd Member, Siân Gwenllian, said she was glad to see the town’s past recognised and celebrated.

“The mural reminds us of Bethesda’s immense contribution to the world,” she said. “It is a welcomed addition to the centre of Bethesda, and the artwork is striking.”

Cllr. Rheinallt Puw, represents Bethesda on Gwynedd Council added that the result was “excellent”.

“The artwork is prominent, thanks to the efforts of Dyffryn Gwyrdd, who cleared Gardd Tan Twr, the public garden below the wall,” he said.

“There are very exciting developments in Bethesda as we celebrate the bicentenary. I hope local residents have an opportunity to pop by and admire the wall.”

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j humphrys
j humphrys
16 days ago

Lately, sadly, a clear advantage in being blindfolded.

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
16 days ago
Reply to  j humphrys

Personally, JH, I find that there’s something visually unique about the Gwynedd slate towns that I find appealing, evocative, and very Welsh.

j humphrys
j humphrys
14 days ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

I generally detest murals. Many look even worse than Beanz Meenz Heinz. One of the very few that cheered me was “My Goodness, My Guiness!”

Last edited 14 days ago by j humphrys
Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
15 days ago

I know I don’t live there but my first thought on seeing this mural was positive and I am still of the same mind.

Penderyn
Penderyn
14 days ago

Forgotten fact …. Cilfoden was the original Welsh name. It was changed to Bethesda in 1819….named after a chapel using a hebrew name I believe.

Mandi A
Mandi A
13 days ago
Reply to  Penderyn

There’s an argument going on here if you can help. Are you named for Dic P or the whisky? Hwyl

Mandi A
Mandi A
13 days ago

This is a great piece of work. Have any of you read Un Nos Ola Leuad (available yn saesneg as One Moonlit Night)? a minor classic. Or O Law i Law. Great novels about real communities.

Last edited 13 days ago by Mandi A

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