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20mph speed limit in Wales will ‘become the norm like carrier bag charges’ says minister after vote passes

12 Jul 2022 4 minute read
Picture by the Welsh Government

20mph speed limits in residential areas in Wales will become the norm like carrier bag charges and organ donation, a minister has said after the vote passed.

Wales becomes the first UK nation to make the move that the Welsh Government say will help to save lives, develop safer communities, improve the quality of life and encourage more people to ride a bike or use public transport.

Welsh Conservative leader Andrew RT Davies said that the move showed that Labour were “slowing Wales down”.

“Local people know their roads best. They should have a say on speed limits,” he said.

But Minister for Climate Change, Julie James said that she was “delighted” that the vote passed with the help of Plaid Cymru.

“We know this move won’t be easy – it’s as much about changing hearts and minds as it is about enforcement – but over time 20mph will become the norm, just like the restrictions we’ve introduced before on carrier bag charges and organ donation,” she said.

“The evidence is clear, decreasing speeds not only reduces accidents and saves lives, but helps improve people’s quality of life – making our streets and communities a safer and more welcoming place for cyclists and pedestrians, whilst helping reduce our environmental impact.

“Once again Wales is leading the way for other UK nations to follow.”

‘Safer’

The new slower speed limits are currently being trialled in eight communities across Wales and will be rolled out nationally in September 2023.

The new legislation will not apply a blanket speed limit on all roads, it will simply make the default limit 20mph, leaving local authorities to engage with the local community to decide which roads should remain at 30mph.

Currently, just 2.5% of Welsh roads have a speed limit of 20mph, but from next year this is expected to increase to approximately 35%, helping to create safer roads and communities across Wales.

Last week travel campaigners urged the Senedd to back the plans, highlighting research which shows that pedestrians are 40 per cent less likely to die when hit by a car travelling at 20mph compared with one travelling at 30mph.

A survey conducted by the Welsh Government last November also found that 80 per cent of participants supported the plans, in particular parents or those with children in the household.

Backing the new speed limit, Stephen Edwards, Chief Executive of the campaign group Living Streets, described the plans as “life-changing legislation”.

“When the speed limit is reduced from 30mph to 20mph there is typically an average decline in casualties of at least 20%,” he said.

“There are also benefits in terms of reduced noise and safer and more cohesive communities that are more pleasant to live in. People are also likely to be encouraged to walk or cycle more, which is good for their health and pollution levels.

“It’s simple: slower speeds save lives – and I urge Members of the Senedd to support the 20mph in the vote.”

‘Diktat’

Earlier however the Welsh Conservatives had described the plans as as “frankly ludicrous”.

“The Welsh Conservatives are not against introducing 20mph speed limits outside schools, playgrounds, places of worship and high streets, but a blanket roll-out is quite frankly ludicrous,” Shadow Minister for Transport, Natasha Ashgar MS, said.

“It’s extraordinary that that the Labour Government has admitted this will have a negative cost of £4.54bn to the Welsh economy – is this appropriate at a time when the Labour Government should be focused on tackling the big issues at hand such as the cost-of-living? I don’t think it is, and I am sure residents across the country will be thinking the exact same.

“This is yet another diktat imposed by Labour from Cardiff Bay.

“Speed limits like this should be decided by councils in their local areas, not top-down by Labour ministers.

“Let’s give local people the power over their communities, the very people who know their roads best.”


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Cameron Wixcey
Cameron Wixcey
1 month ago

Where did they get 80% support from?
No one I have spoken to think the main road from Magor to Caldicot should be 20. They and me agree with it near schools and side streets.

Cathy Jones
Cathy Jones
1 month ago
Reply to  Cameron Wixcey

So…because the whole Cymru hasn’;t come and told you that they want a 20mph speed limit but the whatever number of people you have spoken to have all agreed (to your face) with you?
Yup that sounds like democracy, better scrap this one guys, yeah..Cameron’s people have said they agree with him, so shut it all down..

Gareth
Gareth
1 month ago
Reply to  Cameron Wixcey

The article states that the default limit will be 20 mph, leaving local councils to decide if some roads are 30, just lobby you’re local coucil if the road is as you say, as you have support.

Richard
Richard
1 month ago

The Tories must now focus on calling the Mark Price /Adam Drakeford Gvt to account – but be evidence based and research focused…. NOT negative and reactive.

This move is to be welcomed as a useful and responsible step BUT it needs to done in stages and over a set number of years to bring people with it and evaluated by Independent experts – not the usual Labour pals who are the usual Suspects.

Cathy Jones
Cathy Jones
1 month ago
Reply to  Richard

No it doesn’t… You see it works like this: People voted for Labour in the Senedd elections, then they put laws to be passed in the Senedd and then the ELECTED members of the Senedd then vote for the laws and if the bill passes, it becomes law and that is that and the law becomes the law when the Senedd says so. We need to bring in measures to increase safety in residential areas now and we need to start reducing emissions (which in a small way this new law will help with…every little helps and all of that)… Read more »

Cathy Jones
Cathy Jones
1 month ago

I don’t think a law that was voted in by a democratically elected government can be called a “diktat” with the person suggesting it is so retaining any political credibility.

Richard
Richard
1 month ago
Reply to  Cathy Jones

I cannot recall this being in the election manifestos of the two party leaders ? Perhaps you might correct if I’m wrong.

James
James
1 month ago
Reply to  Richard

See page 31 of the Welsh Labour 2021 manifesto: https://movingforward.wales/documents/WEB-14542_21-Welsh-Labour-Manifesto_A5.pdf

See page 13 of the Plaid Cymru 2021 manifesto, which admittedly does not specify 20mph but does refer to, “Designating safer speed limits in all built up areas”: https://assets.nationbuilder.com/plaid2016/pages/11875/attachments/original/1649181118/Plaid_Cymru_2022_Local_Government_Manifesto.pdf?1649181118

Erisian
Erisian
1 month ago

It gets my vote if it means Carmarthenshire will remove all their ridiculous speed bumps.
I’d even prefer speed cameras

Kurt C
Kurt C
1 month ago

Pointless without enforcement. My road a deathtrap as always. Been aware of the Nitrogen dioxide issue for decades, so get on with it properly. A sign won’t change behaviour alone

NOT Grayham Jones
NOT Grayham Jones
1 month ago

You can change the limit to whatever you want but without effective enforcement the number of a sign makes no difference to johnny boy racer. What does the Welsh Govt have in place to enforce this new law- if that is nothing it is a total waste of time.

I.Humphrys
I.Humphrys
1 month ago

Yes. Everything now is “let’s look at the footage”. Meanwhile, join the queue at A & E.

Leigh Richards
Leigh Richards
1 month ago

Once again Wales leads the way 👏

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