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Affordable housing developments grind to a halt due to phosphate restrictions

12 Mar 2022 3 minutes Read
Afon Twyi by joysaphine is marked with CC BY-NC 2.0.

Katy Jenkins, local democracy reporter

Guidance on phosphate levels in Welsh rivers has brought development in Ceredigion to a halt, according to councillors in discussions with Natural Resources Wales (NRW).

NRW’s stricter guidance on phosphate levels in Special Area of Conservation (SAC) rivers – including the Teifi – and the impact on Ceredigion have been raised before, but this week Ceredigion county councillors had chance to grill a representative from the organisation.

A special thriving communities overview and scrutiny committee met on Friday 11 March and spent two hours discussing phosphate issues with Gavin Bown, who apologised for not being able to join a previous committee meeting on the matter where Dwr Cymru Welsh Water attended.

There are more than 500 homes in allocated sites – 114 of which would be affordable – that cannot be built at the moment due to the phosphate restrictions and the need for mitigation measures to be put in place.

Mr Bown said that the new water quality standards are around 50 to 80 per cent stricter and further guidance, with emphasis on specific issues such as agriculture, are due for release shortly.

Unfair impact

Nutrient management boards set up to consider ways of improving water quality and lowering phosphates are due to meet next week with Ceredigion’s first meeting – chaired by cabinet member for economy and regeneration Cllr Rhodri Evans – on March 17, the same days as Pembrokeshire and Carmarthenshire’s boards.

Work was underway, and would be a collaborative process, to reduce phosphates, the committee heard with projects to focus on mine water and a £9m Rivers for LIFE project that includes the Teifi, development of nutrient calculators, reed bed development and improvements to riverbanks.

Cllr Dai Mason said he was surprised that experts at Aberystwyth University working on experimental research in solving phosphate problems without chemicals had not been approached and Mr Bown said he would explore that option further.

Others raised concerns about the introduction of the levels without consultation and guidance or management measures in place which had an “unfair” impact on rural areas.

NRW phosphate level maps for west Wales shown to thriving communities overview & scrutiny committee.

When marine SAC requirements are introduced around 90 per cent of Ceredigion won’t see any development until the mitigation measures are in place, added Cllr Evans.

While Cllr Keith Evans asked had there been consideration of the “damage” being done to the local economy and growth by “putting a stop to development anywhere along the Teifi river.”

Committee chairman Cllr Marc Davies said it was a “very complex topic and it will be a challenge to you and ourselves.”

Mr Bown said: “I realise the strength of you statements and the importance of getting a rapid solution.”

He said the points raised by the committee would be fed back to NRW and the committee also agreed it would send a letter itself to reiterate the issues.


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hdavies15
hdavies15
2 months ago

Is the big rush to build those new houses driven by an urgent need to accommodate people within the area who need a roof over their heads or are we anticipating another wave of white flighters, drop outs and downright colonists to rock up any time ?

Argol Fawr!
Argol Fawr!
2 months ago
Reply to  hdavies15

I’ll choose not to interpret your comment in the bigoted way it comes across.

Placing an embargo on house building is a very blunt tool in the challenge of encouraging Welsh culture and communities. It merely pushes prices of existing stock even further beyond local affordability.

Last edited 2 months ago by Argol Fawr!
I.Humphrys
I.Humphrys
2 months ago
Reply to  Argol Fawr!

Just wait, though. Current geopol crisis may well result in sinking property values in London which will tsunami from there.

Last edited 2 months ago by I.Humphrys
hdavies15
hdavies15
2 months ago
Reply to  Argol Fawr!

If there is bigotry it tends to come as part of the baggage so many of those supremacist white flighters bring with them. Even the lifestyle lefties find it difficult not to look down their snobby snouts at those with roots in these places. Blunt tools are about all that’s left in the government’s tool box or so it seems. Having impoverished coastal and rural communities in various parts of Wales, it’s now open season when the relatively well heeled come over for easy pickings.

Argol Fawr!
Argol Fawr!
2 months ago
Reply to  hdavies15

Then bring back Section 106 of the planning restrictions that Jenrick and the Tory skimmers did away with in 2020.

Erisian
Erisian
2 months ago

This should at least have the benefit of turning up the pressure to fix our rivers.

Argol Fawr!
Argol Fawr!
2 months ago

Arn’t Welsh Water dodging a bullet here? Phosphate treatment processes already operate well across the Country…. Provided they’re competently designed and operated (DC), plus the NRW don’t turn a blind eye to consent breaches. After all 500 houses equate to pretty good rates revenue for both DC and the LA.

Last edited 2 months ago by Argol Fawr!
I.Humphrys
I.Humphrys
2 months ago

Whatever happened to the Brownfield site cause?

hdavies15
hdavies15
2 months ago
Reply to  I.Humphrys

Brownfield has been redefined as “Welsh countryside” where anything goes !

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