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Ambitious plans for Caerphilly Castle revamp set for approval

06 Jun 2022 2 minutes Read
Caerphilly Castle. Picture by Rob the moment (CC BY 2.0)

Rhiannon James, local democracy reporter

Councillors are set to approve ambitious plans to revamp Caerphilly Castle to boost visitor numbers by 30%.

As part of a £5 million revamp, the Great Hall will be given a makeover and a new visitor centre will be built.

The proposals are part of Cadw’s five-year “masterplan”, which was announced in 2019, to improve the 13th century Grade I listed castle.

Planning officers have recommended that Caerphilly County Borough Council’s planning committee approve Cadw’s application when it meets on Wednesday, June 8.

Cadw is a Welsh Government body responsible for Wales’ historical sites and it hopes the proposed plans will encourage more people to visit Caerphilly Castle and the town centre.

The new visitor centre will have a reception area, café and toilets on the ground floor and staff facilities on the second.

Green roof

Part of the building will have a green roof, and will have a maximum width, depth and height of approximately 31.5 metres, 16 metres and seven metres respectively.

The planning report, which will be discussed by councillors, states: “The position and height of the proposed building has also been carefully considered so that it is concealed by the castle wall when viewed from Castle Street.”

However, it will be visible from Dafydd Williams Gardens.

Outdoor seating and play areas are also proposed near the new vistor centre.

The current visitor centre will remain as a shop and ticket office.

The Great Hall is subject to minor refurbishments including underfloor heating, but most of the refurbishment work will be done on Earl’s Apartment.

Changes to the Great Hall and Earl’s Apartment will link them better and allow for a marquee to be erected when events are held at the castle.

Visitor access is also set to be improved, with decking, handrails, ramps and bridges proposed throughout the grounds, as well new benches and signs.


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Andrew
Andrew
26 days ago

Cadw insist on ignoring the native indigenous castle nearby. Their policy seems to be, nothing to see here, if it involves the history of the Cymru.

Roderich Heier
Roderich Heier
26 days ago
Reply to  Andrew

Please pardon my ignorance but what ‘native indigenous castle nearby’? I used to live in this area and know nothing of it.

Llinos
Llinos
26 days ago
Reply to  Roderich Heier

I just checked Archwilio.co.uk and there is a Castell Mor Graig on the ridge near Thornhill Road and a Castell y Van (Fan?) to the east of Caerphilly Castle. The links are to an old maps repository owned by the National Library of Scotland.
I know there’s a Roman settlement near Caerphilly Castle too, but given the Anglocentric archaeology sector, this could also be an Essyllwr settlement

Roderich Heier
Roderich Heier
26 days ago
Reply to  Llinos

Thank you for this information. I knew there was a roman fort at Gelligaer. I didn’t know there was a roman settlement near Caerfilli Castle.

Andrew
Andrew
26 days ago
Reply to  Roderich Heier

Exactly

Roderich Heier
Roderich Heier
26 days ago
Reply to  Andrew

So where is this ‘native indigenous castle’? Pwllypant, Abertridwr, Senghennydd, Llanbradach, Ystrad Mynach, Nelson, Bedwas, Machen ?!Senghenydd seems likely. There was a native lord there who did raid the the Anglo Norman marcher lords.

Geoffrey ap.
Geoffrey ap.
26 days ago

Cadw always portray the history of Cymru from the English perspective so as not to cause offence to English visitors. In doing so they deny the local people their place in history. No where is the information given to explain the that the invasion of Cymru was carried out by killing the natives and taking possession of their land. This castle was built to counter the power of Llewellyn ap Gruffydd. It is a military construction of occupation, similar to the German forts along the French coast, and it should be portrayed as such, not a romantic fairy castle.

Glenys Llewellyn
Glenys Llewellyn
25 days ago

The entrance fee should be free for people over 60 years old. All the castles in Wales are far to expensive for pensioners. We get £175 a week and can’t afford the prices for entry into most Castles in Wales.

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