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One arrest after anti-monarchy protests in Cardiff and Edinburgh

11 Sep 2022 3 minute read
People protest ahead of the Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Cardiff Castle. Picture by Ben Birchall / PA Wire.

There has been one arrest after anti-monarchy protestors gathered in Cardiff and Edinburgh ahead of the accession proclamations of King Charles III in Edinburgh.

Police Scotland said an arrest was made outside St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh, where the Queen’s coffin is due to be held on Monday.

There were also protests at the accession proclamation in Cardiff, with a small group holding anti-monarchy signs.

Hundreds had lined the streets outside the castle walls, including two protesters holding signs reading, in Welsh and English “Not our king!” and “It’s colonial subjugation of the Welsh people.”

A protester before the Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Mercat Cross, Edinburgh. Picture by Isobel Frodsham / PA

Moments before the proclamation in Edinburgh on Sunday afternoon, a demonstrator appeared in the crowd opposite the Mercat Cross.

She held a sign saying “f*** imperialism, abolish monarchy”.

Officers appeared behind her and took her away, prompting the crowd to applaud.

One man shouted: “Let her go, it’s free speech,” while others yelled: “Have some respect.”

A police spokesman said a 22-year-old woman was arrested “in connection with a breach of the peace”.

It came after hecklers were heard booing during the event.

During the first proclamation of Charles, the Lord Lyon King of Arms gave a speech before declaring “God save the King”, which the crowd repeated.

One man was heard booing throughout the cheers.

The national anthem was then sung but, afterwards, people could be heard calling for a republic.

After Lord Lyon King led three cheers, saying “hip hip” to replies of “hooray”, booing was heard for a second time.

Suspended

Earlier thousands of people had gathered at Cardiff Castle to hear Charles be proclaimed King in Wales.

More than 2,000 people had been allowed inside the grounds since the gates opened at 10am.

Prior to the Proclamation, 26 men of the 3rd Battalion the Royal Welsh – supported by the Band of the Royal Welsh – were marching from City Hall at 11.25am along the Boulevard de Nantes, North Road and Duke Street to the castle.

They were accompanied by the regimental mascot, a Welsh billy goat called Lance Corporal Shenkin IV, and Goat Major Sergeant Mark Jackson.

Inside the castle, the Wales Herald of Arms Extraordinary, Tom Lloyd, made the Proclamation in English and the Lord-Lieutenant of South Glamorgan, Morfudd Meredith, proclaimed Charles King in Welsh.

After the readings, members of 104th Regiment of the Royal Artillery fired a 21-gun salute before the singing of God Save The King and Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau.

It was the third time in three days that artillery fire has resounded across the Welsh capital to mark both the Queen’s death and the accession of her son to the throne.

Flags on the castle and council buildings, which had been flying at half-mast, were returned to full-mast on Saturday, to coincide with the Reading of the Principal Proclamation of the new monarch in London.

Flags will return to half-mast at 1pm on Sunday after the Proclamation is read in Cardiff.

The Senedd was also recalled at 3pm to allow members to pay tribute to the Queen.

All other business has been suspended until after the state funeral on Monday September 19.


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Tawelwch
Tawelwch
17 days ago

Since there are no reports of violence in Edinburgh, there is no justification for anyone to have been arrested. If it was the brave woman in the photo, whose placard echoes the thoughts of many, I hope that a crowdfunder will be set up to cover her legal costs and that Nation Cymru will inform us of it so we can contribute in solidariy.

Peter Cuthbert
Peter Cuthbert
17 days ago
Reply to  Tawelwch

Yes indeed. It also seems very strange that Parliament and the Senedd have been put on ice until after the funeral. There are huge issues facing the country and I would like my reperesentatives to be there working on sensible solutions.

Krag
Krag
16 days ago
Reply to  Tawelwch

I must disagree. I want her arrested for her foul language on the placard. I am tired of the people who think they should infect us and our children with their foul words because they think it’s fine. So much more can be stated by the many other words we have available to us without offence.

Steve Duggan
Steve Duggan
17 days ago

People have the right to voice their opinions – that smacks of something a dictatorship would do. It shows the way the country is going – they’ll be banning peaceful marches they don’t like next.

The original mark
The original mark
17 days ago

It’s at times like this you see how pathetic and subservient the majority of the UK is. Makes me puke.

David Smith
David Smith
17 days ago

Cap-doffing serfs with obviously little held dear, or of any profundity in their own lives, such that they feel the need to grieve and snivel over a woman they never knew personally in any capacity.

David Smith
David Smith
17 days ago

Such pantomime-esque tripe. Funny how the UK slips into authoritarianism when the facade of universal adulation is punctured. All in a supposed 21st century liberal democracy. What a crock. North Korea lite.

Brian
Brian
16 days ago

Are we talking about Cardiff or Moscow?

Gaynor
Gaynor
16 days ago

Which “the national anthem was sung” ? I assume it was the English one? So can you state this. The BBC seem to think that GSTK is the non existant ” our national anthem” . You should know better .

Krag
Krag
16 days ago
Reply to  Gaynor

They sang both national anthems.

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