Budapest café undergoes Welsh language rebrand for a day

Három Holló

A café in central Budapest, Hungary, surprised guests with a new Welsh name, Welsh pop music and a bilingual drinks menu on Friday.

“Három Holló” (’The Three Ravens’ in English) adopted a Welsh-language name “Y Tair Cigfran” and a Welsh music playlist to celebrate.

The special night marked the fifth annual Dydd Miwsig Cymru (Welsh Language Music Day), which honours all forms of Welsh language music – indie, rock, punk, funk, folk, electronica, hip hop and everything in between.

“Három Holló” had celebrated Welsh Language Music Day with live bands in previous years. On Friday, they included a bilingual drinks menu, with Hungarian and Welsh appearing side-by-side. Customers could also order in Welsh at the counter.

The venue also featured Welsh-language hits throughout the night, with a range of songs from the likes of Super Furry Animals, Cate Le Bon and Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci playing in the background.

The bilingual menu

The rebrand was arranged by Welshophile music fan and record collector László Záhonyi, in partnership with Három Holló café and Balint Brunner, Editor of Magyar Cymru.

László Záhonyi, who has been organising Welsh Language Music Day events in his native Hungary for several years, said: “I fondly remember the moment I came across the Welsh language for the first time.

“I was reading ‘The Pendragon Legend’, a novel by Hungarian writer Antal Szerb, and he claimed the Welsh language had a wonderful sound, like something from another world. Before I knew it, I’d fallen in love with Welsh culture and boasted the biggest Welsh-language record collection in Hungary.

“I don’t understand much of the lyrics, but that doesn’t stop me. I just listen to the tune and let the words stay a mystery – a story from another world, just like Szerb said it!”

 

‘Visitors’

Ágnes Seregély, Head of Marketing at Három Holló said: “We’re extremely proud to have brought this amazing culture alive in our café, with captivating Welsh music and bilingual signage all across the venue.

“We particularly enjoyed calling ourselves ‘Y Tair Cigfran’ for a day, despite the tough pronunciation, and hope to see many Welsh visitors at Három Holló over the years to come!”

Throughout the year, Welsh-Hungarian events take place across both countries. Last Christmas, residents from Hungary’s “Welshest village” held a special concert to build bridges between the two cultures.

Next month, Hungarian and Welsh families will come together in Cardiff for an annual celebration of their close cultural ties. Held in the Urdd Hall of the Wales Millennium Centre, the fourth Welsh-Hungarian Concert and Folk Dance Event is set to take place on 14th March 2020, to tie in with St. David’s Day and one of Hungary’s national holidays.

The concert series is organised by Hungarian-born classical singer Elizabeth Sillo and the Kodály Violin School of Carmarthenshire, directed by Dorothy Singh. Over the years, many acclaimed Welsh and Hungarian folk artists, the ‘1st Hungarian Hussar Banderium UK’ and members of the National Chorus of Wales have all joined the initiative, including a wide range of performances from both cultures.

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Simon Gruffydd
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Simon Gruffydd

This kind of good news warms my heart – although the irony here is that politically, Wales and Hungary couldn’t be further apart. Hungary supports a popular government with a mission to to defend Hungarian culture and its Christian heritage against EU imposed diktats to allow in “refugees” from the Islamic world. Wales’ political elites are keen to import many more foreigners from the Islamic world under the Nation of Sanctuary banner. Hence Hungary and Wales are polar opposites in these respects.

A Prophecy is Buried in Eglwyseg
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A Prophecy is Buried in Eglwyseg

There is only 1 Welsh revolution and it is the Cymraeg Restoration. Below, the uprisings of the Hungarian speaking nation; what of the Welsh speaking nation? 1437 – Transylvanian peasant revolt led by Antal Nagy de Buda 1492–93 – Revolt of the Black Army of Hungary 1514 – Peasant revolt led by György Dózsa 1526 – 1527 – Revolt led by Jovan Nenad 1572 – Peasant Revolt 1562, 1575, 1595–96 – Szekler uprisings 1604 – Stephen Bocskai’s revolt 1631 – 1632 – Revolt led by Peter Császár 1678 – Emeric Thököly’s uprising 1697 – Kuruc uprising in 1697 1703 –… Read more »

Rhosddu
Guest
Rhosddu

Phew!

j humphrys
Guest
j humphrys

Indeed! In ’56, the rising was to Beethoven’s “EGMONT”. There is a piece on You Tube worth watching, if a bit sad, but here we all are now in the European Union! Oh, I forgot…………………………..

mkrivansky
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mkrivansky

comment image

st3ve
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st3ve

FYI: Your banner “Nation Cymr” is missing the “U” in portrait mode.

Robert Roser
Guest

How could they leave out Janos Arany, the most famous Hungarian poet and his work “A Walesi Bardok” “The Bards of Wales”?