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Caernarfon to host conference opposing plans for new nuclear power stations in Wales

19 Jul 2022 3 minute read
Wylfa on Anglsey. Picture by Reading Tom (CC BY 2.0)

Campaigners are holding a conference in Caernarfon on Saturday to coordinate opposition to plans for new nuclear power stations at Wylfa on Anglesey and Trawsfynydd in Gwynedd.

Speakers at Saturday’s conference will outline the case against the new nuclear power plants, highlight the financial and operational risks associated with the respective reactor designs, and outline the prospects for a renewable energy future for Wales.

Nuclear Free Local Authorities Secretary Richard Outram who will be the opening speaker at the conference, said: “The NFLA is delighted and proud to be part of this important conference, and it is only fitting that it be held in Caernarfon, symbolically the most Welsh-speaking part of Wales, to co-ordinate the nation’s opposition to English plans to impose new nuclear power plants on Wales.

 “Our message from this conference will be simple – nuclear is not wanted or needed by Wales.

“Nuclear is too costly, too slow, and too fraught with financial uncertainties and operational risks to be an energy option for Wales, and it is simply illogical when Wales is blessed in abundance with natural resources, wind, sun, waves and rivers, from which the nation’s energy needs can be met more cheaply, more quickly, with the creation of many more jobs, and without the toxic legacy of nuclear waste.”

Activists and Councillors from across Wales have been invited to the conference which is also open to the public.

Contributions will be translated into English and Welsh. It will also be webcast.

The conference will end with a symbolic signing of the Caernarfon Declaration outlining the strength of feeling against nuclear and the aspiration for a renewable future for Wales.

Energy strategy

Wales has been the focus of a number of potential nuclear projects since the UK Government committed to building a series of new power plants in its new energy strategy published in April.

In June a development company backed by the Welsh Government announced it was embarking on a programme to bring small modular reactor (SMR) technology to the site of the decommissioned nuclear power plant at Trawsfynydd.

Cwmni Egino, which is wholly owned by the Welsh Government, said it was working together with the landowner, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), on proposals for the siting of a new nuclear development, with a target date for construction to start in 2027.

The UK Government has also backed plans for a new nuclear power plant on Anglesey.

Two American companies, Westinghouse and Bechtel, are involved in developing the scheme which could see two reactors constructed on the site of the decommissioned Wylfa Newydd site.

Earlier this month it was also confirmed that Deeside had been shortlisted as a potential location for the first factory in the UK to build a fleet of small modular nuclear reactors.

The Rolls-Royce-led consortium developing the new technology confirmed a list of six locations for the factory, which also included Richmond in North Yorkshire, along with Sunderland, Ferrybridge in West Yorkshire, Stallingborough, Lincolnshire, and Carlisle.

The winning bid has been promised investment of up to £200m and the creation of up to 200 jobs.


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Dr Jonathan F Dean
Dr Jonathan F Dean
4 months ago

If they are to exist in Wales, Deeside would make a good location for a nuclear station as it would avoid the constrained north Wales grid and waste heat could be usefully used, helping the economics

Kenneth Vivian
Kenneth Vivian
4 months ago

If the welsh do need nuclear energy a site in the far North West of england would be favourite.

Glyn Jones
Glyn Jones
4 months ago
Reply to  Kenneth Vivian

Or on the Thames? Next to Westminster Palace maybe?

Popsie
4 months ago
Reply to  Glyn Jones

Then you will moan about the differential in wealth between Wales and the south East.

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
4 months ago

On the north bank…

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
4 months ago

Good news about the webcast…once the start-up money has reached the pockets of the bow-tie wearing professionals we will hear no more about it…just like the EU money…

Last edited 4 months ago by Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
4 months ago
Reply to  Mab Meirion

N.C please could you provide a link to the webcast or anyone else?

Leigh Richards
Leigh Richards
4 months ago

Think geological studies have shown that theres a spot next to the uk parliament at westminster that would be just perfect! 😉 And those same studies have found that Buck House would be the perfect place to bury the deadly poisonous waste it will produce!

Last edited 4 months ago by Leigh Richards
The Original Mark
The Original Mark
4 months ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

We didn’t get proper sewerage systems until Westminster was forced to close due to The Great Stink of 1858, so maybe your suggestion might be worth looking at?

Popsie
4 months ago

On today of all days, when the flames of global warming are licking at our heels, you object to a low carbon source of electricity in Wales

Leigh Richards
Leigh Richards
4 months ago
Reply to  Popsie

Good try at twisting things lol but absolutely no one is objecting to low carbon sources of energy – people quite naturally object to the poisonous waste it will produce (and which would need to be buried underground somewhere in wales for thousands of years). Futhermore Wales already produces twice as much electricity as we use – Wales catogorically doesnt need this! If england needs it to meet its energy needs then the uk govt should plonk it somewhere in england and bury the poisonous waste there instead od trying to impose it on us in Wales

Last edited 4 months ago by Leigh Richards
Lira Chards
Lira Chards
4 months ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

Where do you get the idea that this is “for England?

78% of electricity generated in Wales is from burning fossil fuels. Do you think that shouldn’t change?.

There are proposals for nuclear power in England underway.

Sizewell C was approved today.

England leading the way with the environment as usual.

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