News

Council’s cabinet votes to revoke decision on council tax premiums for second homes

25 Nov 2021 2 minutes Read
Conwy Council building in Colwyn Bay

Richard Evans, local democracy reporter

Conwy’s council’s cabinet voted to revoke an earlier decision to charge second home owners a 50% council tax premium.

Instead, second home owners will pay a 25% premium from April 2022, as they have done for the past three years.

Owners of long-term empty homes will pay a 50% premium from next April.

The cabinet also voted for the option to increase the premium to 50% on second homes from 1 April 2023 if they wish.

Although councils can set the council tax premium at 100% for second homes – as have Gwynedd – councillors feared cash-strapped Conwy could lose money if second home owners decided to convert properties to holiday homes. That’s because while councils can generate income from council tax, a large proportion of business rates – such as those paid by holiday home owners – are paid to government.

Cabinet member for finance Cllr Brian Cossey said he hoped for a change in legislation from Welsh Government, which would make life easier for councils dealing with owners converting properties to holiday homes.

‘Very emotive’ 

“It is a very emotive topic, and I suspect among the 59 councillors, we have a complete spectrum of opinion on this particular issue,” he said.

“I really hope by this time next year, we’ll have new guidance, new rules, and we won’t have to worry about it because it will all be utopia in the empty homes and second homes market.”

Speaking about the option of raising the sum next year, Cllr Cossey added: “That (the option) allows us within the 12 months within the working group to carry out a further review,

“That doesn’t mean in 2023 that we will be increasing the level to 50% or 75% or 100% or whatever percentage. That just gives us the opportunity for the working group to deal with the situation once again this time next year. If we didn’t have an indicative level, then we wouldn’t be allowed to make any decision on increasing the premium.”

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Eric Hall
1 day ago

“councillors feared cash-strapped Conwy could lose money if second home owners decided to convert properties to holiday homes. That’s because while councils can generate income from council tax, a large proportion of business rates – such as those paid by holiday home owners – are paid to government’
The answer to that, dear brain-dead Conwy Councillors, is to impose an accommodation tax just like almost every other country in the world.

Mr Williams
Mr Williams
1 day ago

“councillors feared cash-strapped Conwy could lose money if second home owners decided to convert properties to holiday homes”.

Why don’t councillors fear that cash-strapped young people are losing their opportunities to buy or rent a home in Conwy partly (although not exclusively) because of second homes and holiday homes?

Last edited 1 day ago by Mr Williams
Gareth Plas
Gareth Plas
1 day ago

I suspect that the fabric and makeup of the council members is not at all similar to that of the Gwynedd council. This decision is weak and it is clear that Conwy do not want to ” rock the boat” when someone else ie the Welsh assembly, May do it for them in the future. Then, in true governing style, they can introduce the policy and blame someone else. The ability to review in 2022.?…. what the hell is that? The problems of second home ownership are here and now, deal with it. If Conwy rely so much on council… Read more »

Last edited 1 day ago by Gareth Plas
Grayham Jones
1 day ago

No more second homes in wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 all second homes should pay 100 percent taxes on second homes stop being little Englanders and and be proud to be welsh start fighting for your children and grandchildren future in wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 it’s time for a new wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

Grayham Jones
1 day ago

Get the people in town out voting for a new wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

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