Support our Nation today - please donate here
News

Firm which audits SNP accounts resigns amid probe into party finances

07 Apr 2023 3 minute read
Officers from Police Scotland leaving the home of former chief executive of the SNP Peter Murrell, image by Robert Perry PA Images

The firm which audits the SNP’s accounts has resigned, it has emerged.

Accountancy firm Johnston Carmichael informed the party that it took the decision after reviewing its client portfolio.

Earlier this week, former chief executive Peter Murrell, who is Nicola Sturgeon’s husband, was arrested on Wednesday morning by police investigating the SNP’s finances. He was later released without charge pending further investigation.

The party’s treasurer is now seeking another firm to audit the party’s finances.

An SNP spokesman said: “We can confirm that Johnston Carmichael will not be providing audit services to the SNP this year.

“The national treasurer is undertaking a tendering process for alternative provision and we have advised the Electoral Commission of that position.”

The BBC reported that Johnston Carmichael’s resignation took place before Mr Murrell’s arrest.

Johnston Carmichael had worked with the party for more than a decade.

They informed the party they had “taken the decision to resign following a review of our client portfolio and existing resources and commitments”.

Possible sanctions

Large political parties are required to submit independently-audited accounts to the Electoral Commission each year.

The decision means the SNP now have until the first week of July to present their accounts or face possible sanctions, including an independent audit.

On Thursday, new SNP leader Humza Yousaf said it was “very, very clear that the governance of the party was not as it should be”.

He has promised a review of governance and transparency with external input, which will be discussed at a meeting of the party’s national executive committee later this month.

As Mr Murrell was arrested, a large number of police were seen entering he and Ms Sturgeon’s house in Glasgow as well as the SNP’s offices in Edinburgh.

Conservative MSP Donald Cameron said: “This resignation only raises further questions about the increasingly murky picture surrounding the SNP’s finances.

“Given this firm have audited the party’s accounts for so long, the SNP must be fully transparent over why they have decided to quit now.

“The extraordinary events of recent weeks leave the SNP with big questions to answer and their auditors’ resignation only adds to the growing number of issues they must address.

“The public are sick of the SNP shrouding matters relating to their finances behind a wall of secrecy and senior figures – including Humza Yousaf and Nicola Sturgeon – must be upfront about this situation.”


Support our Nation today

For the price of a cup of coffee a month you can help us create an independent, not-for-profit, national news service for the people of Wales, by the people of Wales.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
3 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
10 months ago

Political Parties eh, NI seems to be better off economically without. The Posh Spivs Party takes corruption to the next level (is there anyone of them more slimy than Jenrick, apart from the Brylcreem Boy himself of course), while the Labour Party empty the second barrel into the other foot, first Sue Gray, now Attack Ads worthy of Fat Shanks, so many reasons to have a go at Sunak, but this was from the outfield, or was it Clark Kent getting a bit of his own back. No one, apart from the Royal Family, gets their name mentioned in the… Read more »

Last edited 10 months ago by Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
10 months ago
Reply to  Mab Meirion

Labour invent triple barrel shot gun, do they employ half-wits to do their thinking for them..

Argol fawr!
Argol fawr!
10 months ago

Somewhat too late for a Chartered Auditing accountancy’ to walk away from a job?

Our Supporters

All information provided to Nation.Cymru will be handled sensitively and within the boundaries of the Data Protection Act 2018.