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Guardian under fire for branding some Welsh internationals ‘non-Welsh’

24 Jun 2021 3 minute read
Ethan Ampadu. By Nickb1792 (CC 4.0)

The Guardian has come under fire for branding some Welsh international footballers “non-Welsh”.

The liberal London-based newspaper made the claim in an article about how players born outside Wales were assimilated into the Euro 2020 squad.

These players included goalkeeper Adam Davies, who was born in Germany, striker Kieffer Moore, who was born in Torquay, and midfielder Ethan Ampadu, who was born in Exeter.

The article described how they were taught the Welsh national anthem and were told the “importance” of playing for Wales.

The original headline said: “Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau: How Wales are assimilating their non-Welsh players”.

Following an online backlash, it was later amended to: “Anthem lessons: how Wales bed in their players born outside the country”.

Hedd Gwynfor said: “Non-Welsh? WTF @guardian? They are ALL Welsh! Ychafi!”

Ceri Gwen said: “I’ve seen some pathetic headlines but this takes the cake”.

Kyle Jones said: “I don’t even get mad at this stuff anymore, it’s desperate and pathetic. Absolutely laughable”.

Vaughan Jones said: “If you belong to the diaspora; you belong”.

Jason Lewis said: “This praises the FAW but has a poor headline. It does re-enforce though the ‘they’re all English really’ school of thought.

“Many sports people qualify for multiple countries. Will the term ‘non British’ be used for members of Team GB at the Olympics?”

Matthew Leslie said: “I must have missed the Guardian’s article on how England has ‘assimilated’ those two Irish players.”

‘In theory’ 

The article said: “In theory, Robert Page could name a Euro 2020 lineup comprising players who were born outside Wales, from Adam Davies, the third-choice goalkeeper who was born in Germany, to the Torquay-born Kieffer Moore in attack.

“After Wales sealed their place in the knockout stages, Uefa posted the customary congratulatory tweet – the word ‘qualified’ plastered across a stock image – but the photo was not of Gareth Bale or Aaron Ramsey but of Moore, a brute force and figurehead who, less than two years on from his debut, it is hard to imagine Wales without.

“Of the Wales players who sealed passage to the last 16 in Italy on Sunday, five were born in England. It is thought Moore could even have played for China.

“So how does Page, who was born in the Rhondda valley and won 41 Wales caps, go about inculcating what it means to play for the nation to those born in, in Chris Mepham’s case, Hammersmith, or, in Ethan Ampadu’s case, Exeter?”

It also quoted Wales manager Robert Page, who said: “We made sure that IG [Ian Gwyn Hughes, the Football Association of Wales’s head of public affairs] gave a speech about the anthem.

“We translated it [the anthem] into English, what the meaning of it is, and it is very powerful. I [also] delivered that to the players in the first meeting before the tournament started.

“It was quite an emotional meeting but it makes the players understand the importance of playing for Wales.”


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Dewi Davies
Dewi Davies
1 year ago

Errr.Rahem Sterling.Born in Jamaica .So should he be playing for Jamaica?

Johnny Gamble
Johnny Gamble
1 year ago
Reply to  Dewi Davies

Rahim Sterling and John Barnes born in Jamaica.Owen Hargreaves born in Canada.Michael Owen who was raised and learnt his early football in Hawarden I’m sure there must be more cases.

HeddGwyn
HeddGwyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Dewi Davies

Raheem Sterling moved to England when he two because his father was shot.

Maybe you should go on twitter and question his credentials.

Copy @yescymru in while you are on.

See how far you get.

Dewi Davies
Dewi Davies
1 year ago
Reply to  HeddGwyn

Dont do Twitter. But I’m sure you could let me in on his”credentials”.

Dewi Davies
Dewi Davies
1 year ago
Reply to  Dewi Davies

And why are you bringing skin color into it?I mentioned Stirling because hes a member of the current squad.You automatically mentioned black.Could be purple as far as I’m concerned.

HeddGwyn
HeddGwyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Dewi Davies

His “credentials” are that he went to England as a two year old when his father was shot.

Not, again, that he lived in Jamaica until he found a dead English grandparent.

HeddGwyn
HeddGwyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Dewi Davies

No because he has lived in England since he was two.

Quornby
Quornby
1 year ago

Probably worried in case we go further than England….” You are Welsh if you choose to be”… Dafydd Wigley. I wish that Secretary of State Hart would choose to be.

CJPh
CJPh
1 year ago
Reply to  Quornby

This is one of the more important comments I’ve seen on this site. Parch or gwerth ucha’ i ti

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
1 year ago
Reply to  CJPh

And, DW’s grandfather had moved here from Derby!

Quornby
Quornby
1 year ago
Reply to  CJPh

Diolch CJPh.

Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
1 year ago
Reply to  Quornby

Well said 😊

Quornby
Quornby
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Owen

Diolch Stephen.

Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
1 year ago
Reply to  Quornby

Croeso 😊

HeddGwyn
HeddGwyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Quornby

So if all the settlers and holiday home owners decide to identify as Welsh we have sold one huge problem then no?

William Glyn THOMAS
William Glyn THOMAS
1 year ago

Remember Michael Owen. He and his parents lived in Deeside, Wales. When his mother gave birth she had to travel to England as the Maternity unit responsible was based in Chester, England. I’m sure there are many other such examples.
England did, at one time maybe they still do, give caps to those who had dual eligibility. After one cap their England career was over and they could no longer qualify for their alternative country. How sneaky is that?

Dewi Davies
Dewi Davies
1 year ago

Prime example is Matt le Tisseua(excuse spelling).Because he was born in channel islands he could have played for anyone but England weren’t interested. As soon as we became interested they capped him to stop him playing for us.

HeddGwyn
HeddGwyn
1 year ago

The Michael Owen whose father was an English footballer?

Yeah, I remember him.

Colin Mewett
Colin Mewett
1 year ago

The entire English cricket team are not English

Stuart Cane
Stuart Cane
1 year ago
Reply to  Colin Mewett

There is no English cricket team! There is an England & Wales cricket team who ignorantly call themselves England! They even abbreviate “England & Wales Cricket Board” to ECB just to ensure Wales are put in their place.

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
1 year ago

Didn’t mention that they tried getting Bale to play for England as he qualified due to an
English grandparent. Or Giggs, even though he was Cardiff born.
One of the best ever England goals, scored against Brazil by Jamaican, John Barnes (whose father co-started the bobsleigh team made famous in the film Cool Runnings) who only moved to England when he was 12! Even Terry Venables was Wales qualified!

Dewi Davies
Dewi Davies
1 year ago

How about the Englishman with the great English name.Emlyn Hughes.

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
1 year ago
Reply to  Dewi Davies

Emlyn Hughes insisted he was English through and through. His father, Fred, was from Llanelli and a Welsh rugby international who went north to play rugby league. I remember either Hughes’s father or uncle being interviewed on radio Cymru before an England Wales game and his diplomatic answer was that he hoped Wales won but for Emlyn to have a good game. I don’t think Emlyn Hughes would have chosen Wales and went out of his way to emphasise his allegiance to England. Though I suppose he did end his career at Swansea City so, perhaps he did have a… Read more »

O Rob
O Rob
1 year ago

They can’t stand Welsh success – of any description – so they try and find any way of bringing us down. Pathetic, jealous c***s.

Keith Evans
Keith Evans
1 year ago
Reply to  O Rob

Guardianistas typically espouse every trendy left ideology,but have to get their fix of English superiority, traditionally they do it with Wales,not unusual just typical!

Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
1 year ago

If they feel Welsh they are Welsh, it is great they are playing for Wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

hdavies15
hdavies15
1 year ago

Guardian is now a typical “lifestyle leftie” rag with only a veneer of decency but a huge depth of Anglo Brit supremacist under that surface. It’s the good old “we own everything” attitude which is very akin to Boris’ world view. Best consign it to the same bin as the Daily Mail, Sun, Telegraph and all the other jingoistic rags.

Hywel
Hywel
1 year ago
Reply to  hdavies15

The guardian is all about the status quo. It masquerades as a ‘left-leaning’ paper but it’s perfectly happy with the UK being made up of four ‘great’ nations, a two-party system and a plethora of other establishment policies and
positions. It sneers at the Daily Mail and the rest but it isn’t all that much better really.

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
1 year ago

Double standards again; the Guardian wouldn’t dare to question the presence in the England team of players who have Jamaican parents or grandparents. Yet again, I find myself asking, “Why pick on Wales?” There probably is something in the “envy and resentment” argument.

HeddGwyn
HeddGwyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

Did anyone read the article?

It was a positive piece about assimilation of players into the Welsh side. It wasn’t a critcism.

OK. You all brought up two black players.

John Barnes : moved to England when he was eleven
Raheem Sterling : moved to England when he was 2 because his father was shot!

It is a bit different to them living in Jamaica until they were adults then playing for England on the strength of a grandparent.

Kurt Morgan
Kurt Morgan
1 year ago
Reply to  HeddGwyn

That’s not the point. Once again English media is having a dig at Wales because we are doing well at something. They’re implying our success isn’t valid to make themselves feel better. Saying Non-Welsh is an insult to the players labeled as such. It’s the usual English ignorance and discomfort veiled in a cloak of, supposedly, complimentary analysis. I am and many others are sick of it!!

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
1 year ago
Reply to  Kurt Morgan

Why are you singling two players out for the colour of their skin?

Also, the question of xenophobia is something you need to bring up with the Guardian, since it is they who have adopted an anti-Welsh position. If members of the Welsh diaspora have a Welsh grandparent, they have a right to play for Wales, in line with FIFA rulings.

Last edited 1 year ago by Wrexhamian
HeddGwyn
HeddGwyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

The first two players you all questioned happened to be black and you also questioned they weren’t playing for Jamaica.

You could quite easily have questioned Eric Dier’s Portuguese credentials but you brought up the black ones.

The Guardian did nothing, but highlight that a number of players had to be taught the national anthem and educated in playing for Wales.

Which in fairness hardly suggests a life lived immersed in Royston Jones’ works.

Again. It is the repulsion of having to watch players who are culturally English that affects you so much.

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
1 year ago
Reply to  HeddGwyn

No, Wales wants these players to represent them. It’s the Guardian that is questioning their Welsh credentials. I’ve never heard of Eric Dier, sorry. What have Royston Jones’ works got to do with the Guardian’s complaint?.

HeddGwyn
HeddGwyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

Éric Dier is a white England player who could play for Portugal (possibly).

You only brought up the Jamaican one.

The Guardian wasn’t complaining about anything

It was merely being complementary about how the English born players are given a speech and translation if the national anthfm to help them assimilate.

Which isn’t untrue is it?

CapM
CapM
1 year ago
Reply to  HeddGwyn

Naivety is often based on something that’s not completely untrue.

Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
1 year ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

Yes if they feel Welsh they are Welsh 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

Keith Evans
Keith Evans
1 year ago
Reply to  HeddGwyn

Actually Hedd you brought black into the conversation,everyone else said Jamaican.

Kurt Morgan
Kurt Morgan
1 year ago

I guess Fleet Street has noticed England are playing Germany in the last 16 and Wales are playing Denmark. Non-Welsh 🙄 I hope a Journalist asks England about their Non-English players at the next available opportunity.

CapM
CapM
1 year ago
Reply to  Kurt Morgan

Better refer to the Guardian they didn’t appear to have a problem identifying players they considered “non Welsh” should be easy to apply the same criteria to players representing England.

HeddWynn
HeddWynn
1 year ago
Reply to  CapM

Not really, because there are no English players who are in the team because they found an English grandparent as a their only route to international football.

CapM
CapM
1 year ago
Reply to  HeddWynn

The Guardian article was not about Fifa’s grandparent qualification rule, in general or specifically how it effects the composition of the Wales team. It was about players representing Cymru who in the author of the article’s view were, for a variety of reasons “non-Welsh”.

Alan Reilly
Alan Reilly
1 year ago

The Guardian? The newspaper which portrays itself as being left wing whilst actually being a foghorn of hippy academics who like to tell people who are actually left wing what the left wing should think and do?

There’s only one left wing newspaper in the “UK” and it ain’t the Tory-lite Guardian.

AntonJacques
AntonJacques
1 year ago

I’d say the main issue with the Grauniads article is that, it paints the picture that Wales wouldn’t be in the last 16 without all these ‘foreigners’ in the team. That our success is not based off home-grown talent.

Ignoring the fact Bale and Ramsey would have never played for anyone else internationally.

Charles Evans
Charles Evans
1 year ago

The amount of idiocy in both this article and the comments is astounding. People desperately looking for an excuse to be outraged at the English – it’s pathetic. Why is Welsh Nationalism so fragile?! If we gain independence, might as well call ourselves the Snowflake Nation.

Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
1 year ago

It is not for the Guardian to decide who is and who is not Welsh, if these players feel Welsh then they are Welsh. It is great to have them in the team 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

Gaf Adams
Gaf Adams
1 year ago

Same old tired narrative that Adrian Durham from TalkSport (and the daily fail), has been pushing for the last few years.

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