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Iceland boss calls on restaurants to ditch single use plastic sachets

23 Aug 2021 2 minutes Read
Richard Walker, the Managing Director of Iceland Frozen Food

A supermarket boss has called on restaurants to ditch single use plastic sachets.

Richard Walker, the Managing Director of Flintshire-based Iceland Frozen Food, is urging them to use bottles and dispensers instead.

Almost 855 billion sachets are used globally each year, containing single portions of everything from ketchup and vinegar to face cream, shampoo, and laundry detergent.

Plastic sachets are tricky to recycle because they contain layers of plastic film, so the vast majority end up in landfill or as litter.

Iceland was the first supermarket to sign up to the worldwide Carbon Pledge to become carbon neutral by 2040, ten years ahead of the UK Government’s 2050 target.

Walker succeeded his father, Malcolm, at the head of the £4 billion food giant, which has over 1,000 stores across the UK and Ireland.

On Twitter he said: “Pre-pandemic, enough of these recyclable, single-used sachets were produced every year that they could wrap around the entire planet.

“Now it must be much worse. As things return to normal, it’d be great if restaurants could #sackthesachet  and go back to bottles & dispensers.”

Some companies prefer boosting recycling rates of sachets over a ban.

For example, consumer goods firm Unilever has developed technology it says can successfully recycle sachets in South East Asia.

However, it is still working on developing a viable way of collecting the sachets.

Meanwhile, takeaway firm Just Eat is trialling ketchup and mayoinnaise sachets made from seaweed, which decompose in just a few weeks.

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Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
1 month ago

Iceland boss could recommend the consumption of fresh, non-processed and unfrozen foods…how much power/carbon does it take to run all your freezers?

Last edited 1 month ago by Mab Meirion
Barry Pandy
Barry Pandy
1 month ago
Reply to  Mab Meirion

It wouldn’t be Iceland if they did.

Frozen food can have benefits in that frozen food has a much longer shelf life than fresh food thus reducing food waste. Think about how many fresh peas we would have to collectively eat when they were in season if we didn’t freeze or can them. Those that weren’t eaten or preserved (either by canning or freezing) would go to waste. Preserving food enables us to consume food outside of the growing season.

The quality of their processed foods could be improved though.

Llewelyn
Llewelyn
1 month ago

Iceland, a North of Wales based shop no doubt.

Barry Pandy
Barry Pandy
1 month ago
Reply to  Llewelyn

And your point is?

Llewelyn
Llewelyn
1 month ago
Reply to  Barry Pandy

Sarcasm.

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
1 month ago

I was joking honest…the staff are great!

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