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Labour drops £28bn-a-year green spending pledge

08 Feb 2024 5 minute read
Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer. Photo Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

Labour has ditched a pledge to invest £28 billion-a-year on environmental projects in a major U-turn following months of uncertainty about the plan, in a move set to disappoint green campaigners.

Sir Keir Starmer confirmed that the pledge, central to Labour’s flagship Green Prosperity Plan, will be drastically scaled back with the party now set to spend £23.7 billion over the course of the next parliament.

The Conservatives had seized on the original figure as a key attack line in the run-up to an election this year, claiming Labour would ultimately have to raise taxes to meet the “unfunded spending spree”.

The party’s Warm Homes Plan, a £6 billion package of measures to improve energy efficiency, is set to be one of the casualties of the climbdown with Labour confirming that it will now take longer than originally estimated with five million homes now set to be upgraded during the first five years.

Windfall tax

But it comes alongside plans to extend the windfall tax on oil and gas companies to the end of the next parliament, with the energy profits levy rising to 78%.

Sir Keir sought to play down the U-turn on Thursday, telling reporters “everything on the table is staying on the table” when it comes to the Green Prosperity Plan.

The Labour leader insisted the party in power would still retain its mission to achieve clean power by 2030, stressing that it could still be achieved.

“There is nothing we have said we will do that we are now saying we won’t do.

“I don’t want to have a row about the size of a cheque. I want to have a row about the outcomes,” Sir Keir said.

Labour will hope the move will end speculation about the scale of the plan, as well as neutralising Tory attacks.

Last year, Labour adjusted the original plan by saying the spending target would likely be met in the second half of a first parliament, rather than immediately, if the party wins the next election.

Fiscal rules

The party had also insisted the pledge would be subject to its fiscal rules, which include getting debt falling as a percentage of GDP.

Confusion over the future of the policy had grown in recent weeks as some senior figures refused to refer to the £28 billion-a-year figure, while Sir Keir continued to do so as recently as Tuesday.

Shadow chancellor Rachel Reeves had repeatedly declined to recommit to the spending pledge, instead highlighting the need for “iron discipline” with the public finances.

She repeated her claim that she would still be Britain’s first green chancellor if Labour wins the next general election, as she and her party leader blamed the Tory stewardship of the economy and higher interest rates for the reversal.

“These policies will transform our economy in ways that are incredibly exciting and can boost growth and I am determined to do that.

“But if we made commitments to policies that we wouldn’t be able to meet, we’d end up letting people down,” she said.

Sir Keir insisted that he, Ms Reeves and shadow climate secretary Ed Miliband were all united behind the decision.

The party has moved to drop the pledge ahead of the Chancellor’s Spring Budget, and comes the same day as the deadline for shadow ministers to submit policies for the election manifesto.

Ridicule

The move was met with ridicule by the Tories, who have seized on what they describe as Sir Keir’s “flip-flopping” on major policies as a key attack line.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak warned the “uncertainty about what a Labour government would do is a real risk to our country’s future”.

But it sparked an immediate backlash from green campaigners, as well as warnings from trade union allies and some figures in the energy industry.

Unite general secretary Sharon Graham welcomed Labour commitments to the steel industry, but said: “Britain needs more, not less, investment and there is still much to do in order for Labour to gain the trust of workers impacted by net zero.

“If Labour keep getting scared off by Tory attacks, they will end up outsourcing their policy-making to the Conservatives.”

Emma Pinchbeck, chief executive of trade association Energy UK, warned that “business needs to know that politicians won’t pull the rug from under them”.

She said: “Labour’s spending plans are a signal to the market. The party has been engaging constructively with business over recent months, but retaining the confidence of the market is dependent on not making U-turns that damage the UK’s investability.”

Mike Childs, head of policy at Friends of the Earth, accused Labour of having “turned its back on the people who most urgently need these essential upgrades – the many millions of low-income households suffering from living in poorly insulated homes”.

Greenpeace UK’s co-executive director, Areeba Hamid, accused Sir Keir of having “caved like a house of cards in the wind”.

She said: “Climate action, including borrowing to invest in warmer homes, remains hugely popular among voters. It would be ironic indeed if Labour’s attempt to make their manifesto bombproof from Tory attack ended up just bombing on the doorstep instead.”


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Jeff
Jeff
4 months ago

Still better than the tory party. Remind me what the Tory party has done for the environment, you know, the party with real power now.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2024/feb/05/minister-consulted-bp-over-right-incentives-to-maximise-oil-production-foi-reveals

Leigh Richards
Leigh Richards
4 months ago
Reply to  Jeff

Sadly Jeff on matters of the environment – which is the greatest challenge of our time – it’s now hard to get a cigarette paper between the Tories and labour

Jeff
Jeff
4 months ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

Disagree, they are not in power, the cons have wrecked the uk. we have not seen the books. On balance i expect our future to be bleak under both given the damage these last 14 years. Cons i expect to continue to flog and make us worse, labour i hope to slow the decent then pull us out but miracles in 5 years, nope. Too much damage.

Leigh Richards
Leigh Richards
4 months ago

Labour has now performed so many u-turns under Keir Starmer that Labour party members and supporters must be getting dizzy. Are there now any actual positive reasons for people to vote labour at the next general election?

Last edited 4 months ago by Leigh Richards
Jeff
Jeff
4 months ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

Yes, removing the conservative party. The usual suspect press will be all over this, to put people off.

Mawkernewek
4 months ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

Because if they keep making U-turns, they’ll surely have some good ideas again before too long?

Jeff
Jeff
4 months ago
Reply to  Mawkernewek

How is the power in No10 going at the moment? Them 40 hospitals are looking good.

Jim1
Jim1
4 months ago

So reading between the lines, what Starmer is admitting is that the transition to a low carbon economy can’t be self supporting and self financing (if it could there would be little risk to increasing government borrowing). The transition requires both a substantial power and wealth subsidy from low cost, abundant fossil fuels. If only we could find a ready source…if only, if only?

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
4 months ago

This is Clark Kent’s understudy, who wouldn’t recognize a phone box even if the phone rang…and God said Keir, Keir said What, God said Keir, the next time I give you the plan you’d better run with it…

God be with you Mr Dylan…

Maesglas
Maesglas
4 months ago

Here we go again. Another U turn. Starmer’s Labour offers nothing and does not deserve to win.

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