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Watch: Mark Drakeford accused of ‘faux pas’ after revealing what he discussed with the King at Cardiff Castle

16 Sep 2022 4 minute read
King Charles III and First Minister of Wales Mark Drakeford (right). Picture by Chris Jackson / PA Wire.

Mark Drakeford has been accused of a “faux pas” after he revealed that the King was “concerned” about how people will manage during what is going to be a “difficult winter”.

The First Minister told TalkTV that the impact of the cost-of-living crisis came up in conversation with Charles during their audience on Friday, after the new monarch addressed the Welsh Parliament for the first time as sovereign.

But speaking on Talk TV’s Tom Newton Dunn, Politico Editor Jack Blanchar questioned whether the King had sanctioned Mark Drakeford to talk publicly about what was discussed.

“Well, I don’t know the Welsh for faux pas is Tom, but you’re not supposed to reveal what the monarch says to you in these private conversations,” he said.

“And for years, the Queen has been discreet about these sorts of things. And of course, she will have private conversations with politicians but they will never reveal what happened.

“And Mark Drakeford has just come straight out and told you what King Charles has been discussing.

“I mean, I guess it’s not surprising that King Charles is worried about how people were going to get through the winter – everyone else is – but for the First Minister of Wales to come out and say this makes it look like a political intervention by the King.

“Now whether he’s been sanctioned to do that, I don’t know I doubt it because we certainly never saw that under Queen Elizabeth.”

‘Difficult winter’

The First Minister said the King also told him he was interested in renewable energy generation in Wales, and how it might play a “bigger part” in future energy security.

Mr Drakeford told TalkTV: “The King has always had a very direct interest in the things that are happening in contemporary Wales, the future of our agriculture, the impact of climate change.

“He mentioned the impact of the cost-of-living crisis and how that will impact on people here in Wales.”

Mark Drakeford added: “He (Charles) is concerned as to how people will manage through what is going to be a difficult winter.

“He was interested to tell me about some of the projects that he has heard of, or become involved in dealing, for example, with food waste, making sure that we don’t waste a precious resource when some people might be going without.

“Interested, as always in renewable energy generation here in Wales, and how it might play a bigger part in future energy security.”

‘Worried’

Almost half of UK adults who pay energy bills have said they are struggling to afford them, according to new figures.

The Office for National Statistics revealed that 48% of adults said they were finding it “very or somewhat difficult” to afford their energy costs in a survey between August 31 and September 11.

It represents an increase on a fortnight earlier when 45% said they were struggling with energy bills.

However, households have been promised support by Liz Truss’s new Government due to the soaring cost of energy since the start of the survey period.

The new Government said it will cap energy bills at £2,500 from October, including a £400 rebate which will be paid in six instalments.

It came after industry regulator Ofgem had originally said average bills were due to rise by 80% to £3,549.

Households had already seen their energy costs surge by 54% after the price cap for an average home increased to £1,971 in April.

The fortnightly ONS cost-of-living survey also revealed an increase in concerns from consumers over their regular spending.

It showed that 82% of adults reported “being very or somewhat worried about rising costs of living” in the past two weeks, edging up from 81% a fortnight earlier.

It compared with 74% when households were first asked the question in May.

Around a quarter of adults – 26% – also said they are unable to save as much as usual, when asked about the current state of their household finances.


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11 Comments
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George Atkinson
George Atkinson
20 days ago

The public have every right to know what they spoke about.

Cymro78
Cymro78
20 days ago

Of course Charlie boi was interested in renewable energy projects going on in Cymru, means more money paid into the Crown Estate coffers

Tawelwch
Tawelwch
20 days ago

Not worried enough to donate the inheritance tax payment he escaped to easing the burden on those worst affected, I guess.

Maglocunos
Maglocunos
20 days ago

Da iawn, Mark, well done

Time to blow all this ridiculous ‘protocol’, along with the sycophantic hubris of the corporate media to kingdom come!

Kerry Davies
Kerry Davies
20 days ago

Charles is a farmer interested in farming.
He is an environmentalist interested in green issues.
He is a king interested in whether the common people are finally going to march on the palace with pitchforks. Of course he talks about these things.

Shân Morgain
20 days ago

When Charles was challenged in Cardiff by a member of the public about the cost of living crisis – specifically heating our homes as well as paying for his parade – Charles was speechless and just turned away. He could have said then that yes this was a serious concern. That much wouldn’t break his royal restriction to be non political. He’s had decades in waiting to learn diplomacy and not just chicken out.

Mr Williams
Mr Williams
20 days ago

Why is it a ‘faux pas’? Mark Drakeford didn’t give away state secrets, he simply said the king was concerned about the cost of living crisis. Hardly cause for alarm!

David Smith
David Smith
19 days ago

Did her purr in your ear, Mark of Respect?

Malcolm rj
Malcolm rj
19 days ago

It would have been polite too have told the Welsh parliament about his son was to be the new prince of Wales but he didn’t and Why did he come to Wales on Owen glyndwer day that was on purpose

Wynford Jones
Wynford Jones
19 days ago

Hey Jack, never you mind what is the Welsh for “faux pas”, we’re perfectly capable of expressing ourselves clearly in our own language without the help of your snide comment. And, before you hit the road Jack, what is “faux pas” in English?

Karl
Karl
15 days ago

In a democracy, we the people are the bosses. We have every right to know what people spending out tax are talking about in an event we are paying for.

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