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First Minister not told of new Prince of Wales before King’s announcement, says there’s ‘no rush’ to investiture

12 Sep 2022 6 minute read
Prince William (OGL3) and Mark Drakeford, picture by Welsh Government.

The First Minister has said he was not told there would be a new Prince of Wales before King Charles’ announcement and says there’s no rush to investiture so that “a debate” can be had.

Mark Drakeford told Radio Cymru that “attitudes had changed” since the last investiture in 1969 and that Prince William needed to come to Wales and find out “where he can make a difference”.

“I hadn’t heard anything about it before the new King said it,” he said. “He said it very early in his new period. He had thought about that for a long time in terms of what he wanted to say.

“The role of the Prince of Wales isn’t a constitutional one. But in the Royal Family, it’s an important one.”

Asked if an investiture was imminent, he added: “I had no chance to ask about that – and there’s no hurry. Of course, this week everything is happening quickly and that’s necessary.

“But a lot of what is going to happen now after the funeral on Monday and there will be more time to think about the best way and opportunities for the new Prince to come to Wales and learn more about the priorities of the people of Wales. And see where he can make a difference.

“So there’s no hurry to do anything else I don’t think.”

Asked whether he thought the Royal Family were sensitive to the strength of feeling about the role of the Prince of Wales, he said: “I think they are. I think they know that Wales in 2022 is not Wales as it was in 1969. A lot of things have changed – attitudes have changed as well.

“That’s why I think that the best way is not to hurry to do other things but to take time. To come to Wales to meet with people, to think about what the new Prince of Wales can do effectively. If there’s a debate to be had, to give a chance to that debate.”

‘Proud’

Yesterday the new Prince of Wales spoke with the First Minister of Wales, thanking him for his “fitting tribute” to his grandmother, the Queen, following her death.

He also spoke of his “affection” for Wales and said it will be an “honour” to serve the Welsh people, on the same day his father was proclaimed King at Cardiff Castle.

He revealed in the telephone conversation that he would be travelling to the country “at the earliest opportunity” to meet Mark Drakeford and other political leaders in person.

A statement released by Kensington Palace said: “HRH expressed his and The Princess of Wales’s honour in being asked by His Majesty The King to serve the Welsh people.

“They will do so with humility and great respect.

“The prince acknowledged his and the princess’s deep affection for Wales, having made their first family home in Anglesey including during the earliest months of Prince George’s life.

“The prince and princess will spend the months and years ahead deepening their relationship with communities across Wales.

“They want to do their part to support the aspirations of the Welsh people and to shine a spotlight on both the challenges and opportunities in front of them.

“The prince and princess look forward to celebrating Wales’ proud history and traditions as well as a future that is full of promise.

“They will seek to live up to the proud contribution that members of the royal family have made in years past.”

Ceremony

The former prince of Wales ascended to the throne following the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, on Thursday.

Charles was created the Prince of Wales by the Queen when he was just nine years old, with the title belonging to him for more than 64 years.

The title Prince of Wales has long been used for heirs to the throne but it is not an automatic right and is the choice of the sovereign to award it.

William and Kate became the new Prince and Princess of Wales, with the King announcing their titles in his historic address to the nation on Friday.

Kate has become the first person since Diana, Princess of Wales to use the title.

Thousands of people gathered at Cardiff Castle to hear Charles be proclaimed King in Wales.

More than 2,000 were allowed inside the grounds but hundreds more lined the street outside the castle walls, including two protesters holding signs reading: “Not our king!”

Charles was formally proclaimed King at a historic ceremony in St James’s Palace in London on Saturday following a meeting of the Accession Council during which he swore an oath to privy counsellors.

Proclamations were then read out across the UK the next day, including Wales, at midday.

Prior to the proclamation, 26 men of the 3rd Battalion the Royal Welsh – supported by the Band of the Royal Welsh – marched from City Hall at 11.25am along the Boulevard de Nantes, North Road and Duke Street to the castle.

They were accompanied by the regimental mascot, a Welsh billy goat called Lance Corporal Shenkin IV, and Goat Major Sergeant Mark Jackson.

Inside the castle, Mr Drakeford made a short address before the Wales Herald of Arms Extraordinary, Tom Lloyd, made the Proclamation in English and the Lord-Lieutenant of South Glamorgan, Morfudd Meredith, proclaimed King Charles in Welsh.

After the readings, members of 104th Regiment of the Royal Artillery fired a 21-gun salute before the singing of God Save The King and Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau, Wales’s national anthem.

It was the third time in three days that artillery fire has resounded across the Welsh capital to mark both the Queen’s death and the accession of her son to the throne.

When the gun salute ended, soldiers were ordered to remove their head dresses while a call was made for “Three cheers for His Majesty the King”.

Welsh Secretary Robert Buckland attended the ceremony alongside Wales’ opposition leaders.

Other dignitaries included South Glamorgan High Sheriff Rosie Moriarty-Simmonds.

Flags on the castle and council buildings which had been returned to full-mast on Saturday to coincide with the Reading of the Principal Proclamation of the new monarch in London were lowered to half-mast again following the event.

The Senedd was recalled at 3pm to allow members to pay tribute to the Queen.

All other business has been suspended until after the state funeral on Monday September 19.


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Leigh Richards
Leigh Richards
14 days ago

Wales’ democratically elected politcal leader not even told about this seismic decision affecting his country – what more evidence do people need of the contempt the british state has for the people of Wales?

The original mark
The original mark
14 days ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

Going by the amount of groveling and forelock tugging witnessed around Wales, I really don’t see Wales becoming independent anytime soon. The majority of Welsh people are clearly quite happy to be ruled by a foreign monarchy and government,

John Davies
John Davies
14 days ago

Given the size of the crowds, I would respectfully suggest the reaction of the majority of people is just “meh”. A crowd of a few hundred is a tiny proportion of the population. Only the grovelling and forelock tugging gets fully reported, of course. For myself I am getting very tired of this royal circus dominating the news. If Carlo comes to our town I will be staying indoors.

Frank
Frank
14 days ago

After centuries of suppression the Welsh have unfortunately lost the ability to make a decision for themselves without first asking for permission. The English have successfully instilled a sense of inferiority into the people and taken away the backbone of every man. My God what a sorry state of affairs. What is even worse is the Welsh have let it happen without protest. It’s like having your neighbour running your household and you have no say!! The English are still invading Wales but they no longer fight their way in……. they buy their way in very cheaply. Before long they… Read more »

SundanceKid
SundanceKid
14 days ago

I was surprised to learn there were only 2,700 in Cardiff for the Royal proclamation.

Earlier this year, only 46% of people felt there should be a new POW – less than half of all those polled.

Younger people who lean pro-indy and republican will be key to our future.

Sad that we will need to rely on them to save our country rather than doing it ourselves.

John Davies
John Davies
14 days ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

I agree. Bloody rude.

Tony Roberts
Tony Roberts
14 days ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

So the political “leader” of Wales has been so busy with his daydreams of U.B.I. and blanket 20mph speed limits that he was unaware of the fact that the Prince of Wales is always the monarch’s eldest son?

Owain Morgan
Owain Morgan
14 days ago
Reply to  Tony Roberts

It’s not an automatic thing that the English monarch’s eldest son becomes Prince of Wales. Charlie boy didn’t ‘become’ Prince of Wales until six years after his Mother became Queen. For the record, there have been long periods after Longshank’s conquest of Wales in which there has been no Prince of Wales. As for your comment on 20mph speed limits, if you like speeding in built up areas, maybe you shouldn’t be driving 🙄

SundanceKid
SundanceKid
14 days ago

A subtle dig, but a dig nonetheless. The First Minister should absolutely have been forewarned of this. They help themselves to whatever they want and do as they like, irrespective of public opinion.

We absolutely do need a debate and no doubt that throwaway comment about holding a debate will not go down well, as it is something the Royal family had no intention of conceding and they won’t appreciate being made aware of that.

Last edited 14 days ago by SundanceKid
Cathy Jones
Cathy Jones
14 days ago

I can’t tell whether this “Prince of Wales” (wherever that is, I hope he doesn’t come to my country: Cymru) looks more like Oliver Hoare or James Hewitt.

Rhufawn Jones
Rhufawn Jones
14 days ago

Rhown wên i’r mab brenhinol
A chawn wen letach yn ôl,
Y wen lafoerwen, farwol.

Rhedwn lle cerdd mawrhydi
Ar deyrnged ein carpedi,
Gwnawn lwybrau i’n hangau ni.

Chwifiwn ein breichiau hefyd
A gwenwn bawb. Gwyn ein byd!
Diweddwn mewn dedwyddyd

A gwnawn y myrdd geinion mân
I gofio’r dathlu’n gyfan.
Dihiraeth ydyw arian.

Awn heb yr hoen i barhau
I’r nos na ŵyr ein heisiau
Awn i gyd yn fodlon gaeth
Efo’r hil i Farwolaeth.

(Gerallt Lloyd Owen)

Gareth
Gareth
14 days ago

Why would Mr Drakeford be consulted, he is looked down upon from outside Cymru, his treatment during pandemic desicion making, where he often stated he was in the dark over Downing st statements proves this. We are here for them to use, is their attitude, always has been, cant see it changing either, remember you earn respect it is not given, and by remaining a bunch of sycophants , bowing and kneeling to English elite will not get you respect, all part of being a member of the union , know your place.

Mr Williams
Mr Williams
14 days ago

Of course our elected leader wasn’t told. The UK elites see Wales and the Welsh as subservient and beneath them, and therefore our wishes and national feeling are irrelevant to them. They will never change their contempt.
Annibyniaeth!

Argol fawr!
Argol fawr!
14 days ago

I’m in my 60’s. Charles wasn’t my prince in 1969 (even though he gave me a free mug). William isn’t my prince in 2022, and neither is Charles my King. Doubly so since he stated an intention to serve ‘with loyalty, respect and love’ while without debate, proclaiming his eldest son PoW. How to win over the people… NOT.

I.Humphrys
I.Humphrys
14 days ago

Early days yet. Crisis will get worse, and the insensitivity won’t change, how could it when most toffs don’t know what a food bank looks like. Expect riots in England first. In Cymru, as young people become more aware of our history, and others pass away, Yes will grow surely and steadliy, though the crisis of the West will probably accelerate things. There is little they can do to stop the fall, as debt is the basis. Plaid and Gwlad branches must organise from this point on, how to feed the local population and defend those threatened with eviction, etc.… Read more »

Last edited 14 days ago by I.Humphrys
SundanceKid
SundanceKid
14 days ago
Reply to  I.Humphrys

Wasn’t there a Tory MP who said he was “proud” of food banks because it showed the “great British community spirit”?

These Royals’ views are probably not a world away from that.

Y Cymro
Y Cymro
14 days ago

This news just rubs our faces further into the dirt. This also has the English Conservatives DNA all over it as seen with devolution when they would arrogantly bypass the Welsh Government & Senedd. This done to put us firmly in our place. It’s obvious Prince William has been advised behind the scenes to do this because he’s so removed from reality being part of a medieval mafia follows obidiently the Clarence House and government line and will parrot anything he’s told to maintain his and his grinning Cheshire cat wife’s priverledge position in society. The lack of respect and… Read more »

Steve Duggan
Steve Duggan
14 days ago

The Royal family have put tradition before the views of a people, no surpises there. According to the New York Time many of the countries where the monarchy is still head of state are now questioning their future. Asking, why do we have a head of state who is from a family that became rich from exploitating us? Wales – which we all know has been greatly plundered and exploited – should be asking this question far more than anybody else.

Frank
Frank
14 days ago

“no rush for investiture”. Okay, we’ll leave it until the year 6784 then.

Kenneth Vivian
Kenneth Vivian
14 days ago

The Welsh showed little respect when they attacked and defeated the bigger English army in 1485. The Red Dragon waving jingoist Henry Tudor did not consult the English but I suppose the rude Welshman had a right to appoint his son Prince of Wales.

Owain Morgan
Owain Morgan
14 days ago
Reply to  Kenneth Vivian

Henry Tudor, Henry VII of England, was one quarter Welsh, one quarter English and half French. I didn’t know that constituted a Welshman 😉😂😂🤣🤣

SundanceKid
SundanceKid
14 days ago
Reply to  Kenneth Vivian

He wasn’t a Welshman, and he certainly wasn’t using his Welsh hetitage as a basis to defeat the armies of Richard III.

Julie Jones
Julie Jones
14 days ago

Why would he be told? He’s merely a puppet of the British Establishment.

SundanceKid
SundanceKid
14 days ago
Reply to  Julie Jones

And he doesn’t even see it. It’s pathetic!

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