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Motorists urged to use stickers on mirrors to help them ‘Think Bike’

08 Apr 2024 2 minute read
Photo Ralf Geithe

Drivers are being urged to place small “Think Bike” stickers on their wing mirrors to remind them to look out for those on two wheels.

The AA said fatality statistics show its campaign, which was launched in 2014, is “as relevant today as it was 10 years ago”.

Latest Department for Transport figures show 91 cyclists and 350 motorcyclists were killed on Britain’s roads in 2022.

A survey of 12,700 AA members indicated that 89% agree with the statement “it’s sometimes hard to see cyclists”.

Aware

The AA said this demonstrates drivers need to be more aware of road users on two wheels.

Some 15% of respondents said they had lost their temper and used hand signals towards a cyclist.

Edmund King, director of the AA Charitable Trust, said: “The survey shows that 89% of drivers agreed that it is ‘hard to see cyclists’ but it shouldn’t be if they look in the right places.

“It is now 10 years since we launched our Think Bike sticker campaign.

“But unfortunately, the message is still as relevant today as it was a decade ago.

“Cycles and motorcycles make up just 2.75% of miles travelled compared to cars but account for more than one quarter of road deaths.

“This is why it is essential to spread the message again to all drivers to think bikes.”

Vulnerable

Jeremy Vine, broadcaster and cyclist, said: “I’m so pleased to see that the AA is doing this because, if you’re on two wheels, you do feel quite vulnerable.

“And I always think when you’re in a car – I drive too – you don’t always see that that person on the bicycle is a mum, a sister, somebody’s son, someone’s grandfather, maybe even their great-grandfather.”


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Frank
Frank
1 month ago

Fair enough but get motorcyclists to “think vehicles” too. If you ever travel on the A483 you’ll see some spectacular examples of why motorcyclists should “think vehicles”. They must at all times overtake whatever is in front of them even if it means risking their own lives and the lives of everyone else on the road.

blc
blc
1 month ago
Reply to  Frank

You always remember the ones who are a problem, not the ones who aren’t. The standard for motorcycling training and testing is far higher than car drivers, because we’re at such greater risk. Of course there are plenty of bikers who would probably struggle to pass all three tests (theory, module 1, module 2) if they had to take it again, just as I’d wager that a majority of car drivers couldn’t pass their test again. Of course there are plenty of bikers who ride like absolute muppets, but they are far far outweighed by the number of muppets in… Read more »

Padi Phillips
Padi Phillips
1 month ago
Reply to  Frank

Motorcyclists who want to live/stay out of a hospital bed do constantly think about other vehicles, bad road surfaces, places where diesel has been spilled, tar overbanding, manhole covers – some of these even more hazardous when it’s wet. Motorcyclists also have to contend with a large number of other road users who seem to go around with their brains in neutral, seemingly oblivious to those around them and quite often engaged in deep conversation on their mobile phone. Sure there are the idiots on motorcycles, but the Darwin effect soon takes care of that element, or at least the… Read more »

Richard 1
Richard 1
1 month ago

not sure that obscuring wing mirrors is going to do any good, but the danger to cyclists is yet another reason to support the 20mph limit in towns and villages

Jeff
Jeff
1 month ago

Changing the highway code recently doesn’t seem to have reached people. When was the last time people read it? At your test?

Every time I am on my bike I get close calls. Every time I see a cyclist when I am driving, I see close calls. I get irate drivers when i am waiting to safely pass a cyclist. That is before you decide that a good look over your shoulder before pulling out is not required.

look out for cyclists.

Mei
Mei
1 month ago

Vine is hardly a worthy PR agent for cyclists – seems to get off on conflict and road rage by asserting his text book ‘rights’ rather than reading the road and using common sense and being pragmatic in employing a lot more give and take. None more so than when playing in traffic with his dynamically dangerous Penny Farthing in hyper urban London. He’s no advocate for my cycling – and no, unlike him, I’d NEVER undertake a vehicle indicating left – absolute madness and the cause of many sad deaths. Just remember 2 wheelers are vulnerable and may not… Read more »

Rhufawn Jones
Rhufawn Jones
1 month ago

A good tip taught to me by a friend is, when opening your car door, make it a habit to use the hand further away from the door. That makes you turn your shoulder and automatically look in your side mirror, and saves you opening the door into an unsuspecting cyclist.

Peter Cuthbert
Peter Cuthbert
1 month ago
Reply to  Rhufawn Jones

Yes, we certainly need to campaign to encourage drivers to allow space for cyclists. As a tandem cyclist we see a fair bit of poor car driving. We have a 600 lumen front running light and some cars will still pull out in front of us just as we reach their junction. If challenged they claim that they did not see us. Alternate priority/traffic calmed areas are another problem where many car driver will not allow us to exit the narrow section. Often when I challenge them (riding in the middle of the narrow road tends to encourage them to… Read more »

Charles
Charles
1 month ago

Get Mororcyclists to respect local roads noise levels dpeed and how to overtake. Then I will be able to relax and concentrate on my driving and not theirs!

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