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New maps show what Wales’ revised constituencies will look like after Westminster cuts them down to 32

19 Oct 2022 5 minute read
The new constituency map, left, and placards in Ceredigion, right

The Boundary Commission for Wales has today published its revised proposals for the new map of Parliamentary constituencies which will come into force at the next ordinary general election.

As well as publishing its proposals, the Commission has opened a four-week consultation period where the public can share their views on the proposed constituencies.

The changes come after Westminster voted to cut the number of Wales’ MPs down from 40 to 32. The new constituencies could also be used at future Senedd elections.

The newly revised constituencies include changes to those previously published. Notable changes include:

  • Newport West and Caerphilly and Islwyn have had their boundaries changed to create a Newport West and Islwyn constituency
  • Much of the previous Aberconwy constituency has been enlarged to include much of the previous Clwyd, leaving a coastal Clwyd North constituency
  • All of Bangor is now included in a new Bangor and Aberconwy constituency
  • The previously intended Delyn constituency extends downwards and becomes Clwwyd East, with Alyn and Deeside keeping its name but almost completely changing its boundaries
  • St David’s has been taken out of the new Ceredigion-Preseli constituency, and Maenclochog included

Under rules set out in the Parliamentary Constituencies Act 1986 (as amended) each constituency proposed by the Boundary Commission for Wales must contain between 69,724 and 77,062 electors.

The only exception to this rule is Ynys Môn which is a protected constituency, and therefore sees no changes to its name, designation, or boundaries suggested in these proposals.

The full revised proposals

The Revised Proposals see changes to the majority of constituencies initially proposed by the Commission in September 2021, and changes are proposed to every existing constituency.

Writing in the foreword to the Revised Proposals report, Deputy Chair of the Commission Mrs Justice Jefford DBE said: “The Commission received 1,367 written and 81 oral representations on the initial proposals.

“Public hearings were held across Wales to enable members of the public to express their views on the initial proposals and to suggest how they could be amended and improved.

“The Commission is extremely grateful to all those who took the time to contribute.

“As a result, the Commission has revised the initial proposals. It has proposed changes, often significant changes, to 22 of the 32 proposed constituencies.

“It has also proposed different names for nine of the constituencies. There is now an opportunity to make representations on these revised proposals before the Commission makes its final report on proposed Parliamentary constituencies in Wales.”

The initial proposals

Commenting on the publication of the Revised proposals, secretary to the Boundary Commission for Wales, Shereen Williams MBE OStJ said: “I’m delighted to be publishing these proposals today.

“When the Commission published the Initial Proposals in September 2021, we asked for the public’s help in strengthening the new map of Welsh constituencies.

“Thanks to the record number of responses we’ve received, we have made changes, in some cases significant changes, to those initial proposals.

“There is now one more opportunity to affect the new map of Welsh constituencies, during our final four-week consultation period.

“I would urge everyone, regardless of your views on the proposals, to let the Commission know.”

New proposals

The newly published proposals were created following two separate consultations and five Public Hearings since the Commission’s Initial Proposals were published.

Published alongside the Revised Proposals is the Assistant Commissioners’ Report. The Assistant Commissioners were responsible for managing the Commission’s Public Hearings and analysing representations received by the Commission before reporting back to the Commission with their own recommendations.

The Commission considered several factors in developing its proposals, as well as the statutory range of electors.

Geography (such as lakes, rivers, and mountains) was an important consideration, as was current boundaries such as local authority and ward boundaries, they said. The Commission also considered local ties, such as shared history and culture as it developed its initial proposals.

The revised and initial proposals

The Commission is now inviting comment on its proposals as it launches its final 4-week consultation period. Members of the public are encouraged to send in their views, whether they support or oppose the proposals.

The Commission has however stated that it has no power to set the number of MPs, which was decided by Parliament, and will not be able to consider arguments around the number of constituencies in Wales.

An online consultation portal at bcw-reviews.org.uk features the proposals in full, and members of the public can submit their views directly through the portal.

People can also take part in the consultation by emailing bcw@boundaries.wales or writing to The Commission in the post at Boundary Commission for Wales, Hastings House, Cardiff, CF24 0BL.

The Third Consultation Period opens on 19 October and closes on 15 November.

Following the consultation period, the Commission will assess the representations received and submit its Final Recommendations to Parliament in July 2023.

The Final Recommendations will come into effect automatically at the next scheduled General Election.


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Y Tywysog Lloegr a Cymru
Y Tywysog Lloegr a Cymru
1 month ago

TF for that! I feared we might end up lumped in with the VoG serfs and lickspittles.!

hdavies15
hdavies15
1 month ago

I can buy into a 32 constituency format to elect 32 x 2 to Y Senedd rising to 32 x 3 after independence. Dump the present regional members and use STV without party lists as that practice feeds favoritism among party leaders and managers. As for Westminster I think I will exercise my right to withold support as it is evidently a madhouse. There again yesterday’s antics down the Bay makes me wonder about that lot too.

Lyn Thomas
Lyn Thomas
1 month ago

Pairing these to make the new Senedd constituencies will be interesting!

notimejeff
notimejeff
1 month ago

Only guarantee is that without STV we will again get the Commons people have not voted for. Other forms of PR such as party lists aren’t as fair.

Dai Rob
Dai Rob
1 month ago

Not sure the posho’s & retirees down Porthcawl will like being lumped in with the Socialists of Port Talbot.
Oh well, whatever, nevermind.

Glen
Glen
1 month ago
Reply to  Dai Rob

Replacing blue rinse Porthcawl with Maesteg means Bridgend will never again have to suffer another Tory MP.

hdavies15
hdavies15
1 month ago
Reply to  Glen

Glen & Dai You obviously don’t spend much time in Porthcawl otherwise you wouldn’t use those outdated stereotypes. Being “lumped with Socialists” is no big deal as long as we are offered a real one and not some pseudo socialist posho kid from a privileged family.

Glen
Glen
1 month ago
Reply to  hdavies15

Porthcawl will still have its Tory MP, all be it of the red variety in Kinnock jnr.

Y Tywysog Lloegr a Cymru
Y Tywysog Lloegr a Cymru
1 month ago
Reply to  Glen

And I am over the moon about it. Who knows, might even get a Plaid foothold here.

Y Tywysog Lloegr a Cymru
Y Tywysog Lloegr a Cymru
1 month ago
Reply to  Dai Rob

😆 Oh they are gonna HATE it. The far larger Port Talbot means they will never get a Tory rep ever again!

Gareth
Gareth
1 month ago

It is irrelevant how many MP’s we have, as England has the largest population, so they get to decide, we are left out, eg, never having elected a Tory majority in Cymru, but we have spent most of our lives governed by them from London. Cofiwch dryweryn, where all but one of our MP’s voted against, but English MP ‘s carried the day. Indy is the only answer.

Ap Kenneth
1 month ago

So Rhostyllen, Rhosllanerchrugog & Johnston, 4 miles and less from the new city centre get lopped of and added to Montgomeryshire. Only an hour and half to drive down to Llangurig or Derwenlas, some 70 odd miles.All ties personal and economic point to Wrexham for the vast majority but here we are again getting added to a mega constituency just so the arithmetric can add up. Technical term, Load of b******s.

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