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Plaid Cymru condemns Illegal Migration Bill before Senedd vote

20 Jun 2023 2 minute read
Home Secretary Suella Braverman listens to Prime Minister Rishi Sunak during a press conference in Downing Street, image by Leon Neal PA Images

Plaid Cymru has voiced its “utter condemnation” of the UK Government’s Illegal Migration Bill ahead of a Senedd vote on the legislation.

MS’s will vote later today (20 June) on whether or not to withhold legislative consent for the controversial Bill.

The Bill aims to ensure those who arrive in the UK without permission will be detained and promptly deported, either to their home country or a third country such as Rwanda.

Earlier this year, Home Secretary Suella Braverman admitted the legislation has more than a 50% chance of being incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).

A number of human rights organisations have agreed that the Bill is incompatible with international human rights treaties, of which the UK is a signatory, including the European Convention on Human Rights, the 1951 Refugee Convention and the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Incompatible

Speaking before the Senedd vote, Plaid Cymru’s spokesperson for social justice and equalities, Sioned Williams MS said: “Plaid Cymru has voiced our utter condemnation of this Bill many times – both in the Senedd and in Westminster.

“This is a Bill which undermines the rights of unaccompanied asylum-seeker children and young people and is shamefully incompatible with the child-first, migrant-second approach that upholds the best interests and rights of children in Wales.

“Not only is this Bill wholly inconsistent with Wales’s commitment of being a nation of sanctuary, it likely breaches International Human Rights Law and certainly narrows the scope of human rights protections in the UK – removing such protections entirely in some cases.

“No member of the Senedd should consent to a bill which requires Wales to breach international human rights law contrary to our own devolution settlement. Plaid Cymru fundamentally opposes any attempt to undermine the right and power of this Senedd to legislate in devolved policy areas, and this ill-founded piece of legislation is the perfect example of why we hold that view.

“Welsh Government must go one further and take steps to ensure that Wales has the powers to stop any legislation that is incompatible with the values and best interests of Wales.”


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Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
8 months ago

The sooner the likes of Sunak, Braverman and Jenrick are consigned to the dustbin of history the better it will be for these islands…

5 down including the ringleader and the rest will be sure to follow…

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
8 months ago

Sarah Atherton, Simon Baynes, Virginia Crosby, Geraint Davies, James Davies, David Jones and Jamie Wallis…

You’re getting sacked in the morning of the next general election…

Diawl Blin
Diawl Blin
8 months ago

“Welsh Government must go one further and take steps to ensure that Wales has the powers to stop any legislation that is incompatible with the values and best interests of Wales.”

Genuine question – how is letting in a load of Muslims compatible with the best interests of Wales?

Riki
Riki
8 months ago

Oh the irony, they want to protect Wales from colonisation (and least I hope they do) yet are pro immigrant. Honestly though, The only immigration Wales should oppose is those that come from our only neighbour. They are feeding the extinction of their own Nation and they aren’t even aware of it. Imagine having an understanding of the history of Wales and still being pro Immigrant! Wales should be exactly how Japan is.

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