News

Police appeal for information about ‘abhorrent damage’

12 Sep 2021 2 minutes Read
Bute Park image Cardiff Council

South Wales Police Cardiff are “thoroughly investigating the abhorrent damage” to trees in Cardiff’s Bute Park last week and are appealing to the public for information.

In what has been described as extreme vandalism, over 50 trees have been destroyed and plants and planters wrecked.

Vandals also ripped bins from the concrete and damaged manhole covers, leaving a trail of carnage late last week.

Appealing on Twitter this morning, the police added that they are frequently patrolling the park and invite the public to come and talk to them if they have any information.

Beggars belief

Responding to the news Cabinet Member for Culture, Leisure and Sport, Cllr Peter Bradbury said: “Thousands of pounds worth of damage has been done all the way from Blackweir Bridge to Pettigrew Tearooms.”

“I fully condemn this behaviour. It is not acceptable. There is absolutely no reason for anyone to deliberately destroy an area that is there for everyone to enjoy,” he added.

One local resident said: “It absolutely beggars belief. Why not channel all that effort and energy into doing something good, rather than killing trees? What awful human beings.”

Another said: “It’s a big park, and the damage crosses its whole breadth. Not just a few saplings, but dozens and dozens. It must have taken them hours. Hours of snapping trees.”

Last year, in a similar act of vandalism, trees placed on Wellfield Road in Roath to aid social distancing for pedestrians were snapped in two by vandals.

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Grayham Jones
15 days ago

Jail the idiots

Quornby
Quornby
15 days ago

If caught their brief will plead for mercy and they’ll be doing something similar before the week is out.

Last edited 15 days ago by Quornby

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