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‘Pretty shoddy’: Welsh language sign tells shoppers that ‘businesses are closed as usual’

08 Jan 2022 1 minute Read
Picture by @Gethin76 / Twitter

A mistranslated bilingual sign in a valleys town has been criticised as “pretty shoddy” after telling shoppers that businesses in a town are going to be “closed as usual”.

The sign on the corner of Lower Vaynor Road and Cefn High Street in Cefn-coed-y-cymmer says “businesses open as usual” in English but the opposite, “Busnesa ar gau fel arfer” (‘Businesses closed as usual’) in Welsh.

Ironically the town has recently been at the centre of recent criticism around the number of roadworks on the A465 that goes through the village, with business owners saying that they had seen a big reduction in passing trade.

The Welsh Government sponsored roadworks began in 2021 and are expected to be in place for at least another year before normality is returned.

The attempt was criticised as “pretty shoddy” on social media.

“No wonder footfall is down on High St – all the Welsh-speakers are at home!” Winifred Davies said.

Others pointed out that ‘busnesa’ translated literally as ‘being nosey’ and so the Welsh translation said that ‘being nosey is closed as usual’.

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Andrew
Andrew
8 days ago

Oh dear. independent tropical Merthyr is closed.

Dafydd B
Dafydd B
8 days ago

Probably initially translated correctly then not proof checked. Proof checking key and need more Welsh speakers working for Council’s

hdavies15
hdavies15
8 days ago
Reply to  Dafydd B

They do everything they can to duck that obligation. Most Labour authorities treat the language like some sort of taboo subject, “hate” is not a strong enough word to describe their condition. Thus some low level worker is delegated the task of drawing down a Google translation or similar and we end up with this garbage.

David RJ Lloyd
David RJ Lloyd
8 days ago
Reply to  Dafydd B

would be good if nation wales replicated this suggestion

Erisian
Erisian
8 days ago

Not even Google-translate could have messed up badly.
What is sadder is than nobody noticed before the sign was deployed.

David RJ Lloyd
David RJ Lloyd
8 days ago

“petty shoddy” is it ffs get an editor that can read

Bobsnail
Bobsnail
8 days ago
Reply to  David RJ Lloyd

If the editor had used Google Translate the sign would have found to obviously be wrong. How difficult is that?

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
8 days ago

Can you use “agored” to mean (shop) open? Because Wrexham Tesco does, on a big electronic sign. I thought it meant “candid”.

Elvey MacDonald
Elvey MacDonald
8 days ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

Yes, you can. ‘Agored’ means ‘Open’.

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
7 days ago

Do’n i erioed gwybod hynny! Diolch.

David RJ Lloyd
David RJ Lloyd
8 days ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

it has multiple meanings including both you have sited

Simon Watkins
Simon Watkins
8 days ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

To be open about this is to be candid about it

Gaynor Jones
Gaynor Jones
8 days ago

At least they got the first word in the Wenhwyseg🤣🤣🤣🤣..very authentic. Seriously how do they still get these so wrong?

Crwtyddol
8 days ago

Pathetic. They show themselves up, Nobody else, just themselves.

WIlliamsG
WIlliamsG
8 days ago

If you visit Merthyr Town, Church Street is translated as Heol Y Reglwys, Merthyr Council are hopeless

M.R.
M.R.
7 days ago
Reply to  WIlliamsG

They should employ translators, other authorities do.

Paul
Paul
7 days ago

Sure they could all speak English so no big deal

Rhosddu
Rhosddu
7 days ago
Reply to  Paul

Thanks for your suggestion, but that wouldn’t be of much help in increasing the use of Welsh, you see.

John Howard Edwards
John Howard Edwards
6 days ago
Reply to  Paul

That is the all-to-common British attitude applied to people from mainland Europe, i.e. “They all speak English, so no need for us to learn their languages.” This is a typically British socio-linguistic disorder with colonial and imperial overtones.

Mike Pritchard
Mike Pritchard
7 days ago

I don’t see where it mentions a business at all in Welsh, it appears to say ‘nosieness is closed’ to me. Busnesa means nosieness or interfering, a letter ‘u’ would change the meaning of course.

Beryl Lewis
Beryl Lewis
6 days ago

Siomedig iawn

John Howard Edwards
John Howard Edwards
6 days ago

No good using unqualified people to translate. Translation is a post-graduate level profession, so you get what you pay for if you ask a monoglot junior clerk to use a dictionary. Maybe this wasn’t the case in this instance. Not easy to tell what happened here, because even a monoglot using a dictionary probably wouldn’t have confused ‘ar gau’ with ‘ar agor’. He or she may have just had a list of standard terms, with ‘ar agor’ and ‘ar gau’ on adjacent lines, but as has already been said, there couldn’t have been a proof check. There have been so… Read more »

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