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S4C commissions compelling new thriller in Welsh and English

05 Dec 2021 3 minutes Read
Iwan Rheon, Alexandra Roach and Joanna Scanlon star in Y Golau / The Light in the Hall

S4C has commissioned a new six-part psychological thriller, following in the footsteps of dual language filming of Y Gwyll/Hinterland and Un Bore Mercher/Keeping Faith

Y Golau / The Light in The Hall was written and created by Regina Moriarty (Murdered by My Boyfriend) and will be directed by Andy Newbery who directed Keeping Faith and Chris Forster who directed Hidden.

It will star Alexandra Roach from Killing Eve and No Offence, Iwan Rheon from Misfits and Game of Thrones and No Offence star, Joanna Scanlan.

S4C Drama Commissioner, Gwenllian Gravelle said: “This gripping drama certainly promises to be one to remember. With a stellar cast and a talented production team, we can’t wait to introduce Y Golau to S4C viewers.

“This is our first ever co-production with Channel 4 and we look forward to working together along with Triongl Production Company and Duchess Street Productions on this sensational series.”

Deputy Minister for Arts and Sport, Dawn Bowden, said: “I’m delighted that we’ve been able to offer support through Creative Wales funding to this exciting production and partnership between Triongl, Duchess St, S4C and Channel 4 and APC.

“This production is providing invaluable paid trainee opportunities to future-proof our industry, stimulate investment into the local economy, and will showcase Welsh talent, language and culture across the UK and internationally.”

Compelling twists

Described as a sophisticated murder-thriller full of compelling twists and constant intrigue, the series has been filmed through the autumn and will be released in 2022

When Joe, the murderer of Ela Roberts, is set for parole, journalist and childhood friend Cat, and Ela’s mother Sharon, must confront the past and the parts they played in Ela’s final days.

For Cat it’s a chance to write the true events surrounding her friend’s murder and for Sharon a chance to confront the man who confessed to killing her child, but wouldn’t, or couldn’t, say why or what he did with her body.

With so many questions unanswered, Joe’s return to the community could be a way to get to the bottom of the mystery once and for all.

Co-production

It is a co-production by independent producers Donna Wiffen and Jo Roderick from Duchess Street Productions, Gethin Scourfield, Nora Ostler and Alec Spiteri from Triongl, and Laurent Boissel from APC Studios is executive Producer.

The English-language version will be overseen by Commissioning Editor, Gwawr Lloyd and is produced in association with Channel 4 and Sundance Now for broadcast in the UK and North America, Australia and New Zealand respectively.

 

 

 

 

 


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Rhosddu
Rhosddu
7 months ago

I’m assuming we’ll be able to enjoy some dialogue in Cymraeg in the English-language version, as per Y Gwyll, Craith, and Un Bore Mercher?

Wynford Jones
Wynford Jones
7 months ago

Here we go again. S4C financing international English language culture at a time when its overall budget is under threat. And what about OFCOM are they looking after the interests of Welsh-speaking tax payers and viewers?

Dai Rob
Dai Rob
7 months ago
Reply to  Wynford Jones

Recording in English, enables S4C to sell it to international audiences, so it makes total financial sense for the to do this, in these days of budget cuts. Try thinking “out of the box”!!

Dai Rob
Dai Rob
7 months ago
Reply to  Dai Rob

As they have done with Hinterland, Craith, Un Bore Mercher etc etc

Padi Phillips
Padi Phillips
7 months ago
Reply to  Dai Rob

The thing is many European TV seriesdo well without there being an English language version. Even Americans are increasingly accepting of subtitles on programming not in English. The sheer popularity of Scandi noir, and Channel 4s ‘Walter Presents’ is an indication that audiences in the UK have matured, something that appears to be happening all over the Anglosphere. The idea that a TV series has to be produced in two separate versions is very dated now, and it’s persistence, though presented as a courtesy is, I think now a comment that we, as a nation don’t have the confidence that… Read more »

CapM
CapM
7 months ago
Reply to  Padi Phillips

quite right.
Icelandic tv/cinema with fewer speakers of Icelandic than Cymru has of speakers of Welsh does not pander to the section of the Anglosphere that won’t/can’t deal with subtitles.

What should be encouraged and developed is the inclusion of Welsh language and idioms in TV produced in the UK. Including subtitles in English when Welsh speaking characters are interacting.

Robert Griffiths
Robert Griffiths
5 months ago
Reply to  Dai Rob

Borgen, etc Scandi noir drama are very popular international don’t do an English version.

Mathew Rees
Mathew Rees
7 months ago

I’m already bored. A bunch of rootless Glan Taf accents no doubt set in a nameless part of Wales bearing no reality to the linguistic geography or sociology of Wales.

It’s sad that it’s come to this. Then again, I detest TV dramas so I’m sure others will watch it.

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