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‘Save yourself Wales’ says academic from Newport who adds that the UK is ‘irrevocably politically f****d’

28 Sep 2021 2 minutes Read
Jon Worth. Picture by Jon Worth (CC BY-SA 4.0).

A Berlin-based academic who is originally from Newport has called on Wales to save itself by exiting the UK, adding that the union “is irrevocably politically f****d”.

Jon Worth, a journalist and visiting professor at the College of Europe, was driven to despair by “hopeless” Labour’s inability to back proportional representation for Westminster elections at their Brighton conference.

“Really, Scotland, go. Save yourselves because you can,” he wrote. “And eventually Wales too. And Northern Ireland too, providing it doesn’t end in bloodshed.

“The UK is so irrevocably politically f**ked and Labour is no answer to Tory malevolence.”

He added that under First Past the Post there was no hope of anyone else replacing Labour or the Conservatives.

He called Starmer’s party a “pile of such moribund hopelessness I now don’t know what the hell to do to save it”.

Labour’s failure to back proportional representation despite around 80% of constituency Labour parties voting to back it on the conference floor. But 95% of affiliate votes, mainly unions, voted against.

The vote was also blasted by Labour Senedd Member Alun Davies, who called it “typical Labour”.

“All about managing the party. And nothing about governing,” he said.

He added that Conservative rule “suits too many people in Labour. Power involves compromise and risk. Opposition can be very comfortable.”

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R W
R W
23 days ago

The professor is absolutely right. It is up to us to free ourselves from the yoke of Westminster.

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
23 days ago

Alun Davies seems to have it right with the “…Opposition can be very comfortable.” comment. It’s very noticeable when a Labour spokesman is asked ‘Well what would you be doing instead’. Nearly always revert to a stock waffle of ‘Well.. we would asses the situation on its merits and take the required action blah blah’. Or ‘we wouldn’t have allowed this to develop in the first place blah blah’. All a load of useless tossery. And as Alun Davies says, very unlikely to lose their seat unless some sort of proportional representation happens. (Not even a distant relative/cefnder Cymraeg, as… Read more »

Last edited 23 days ago by Huw Davies
Erisian
Erisian
23 days ago

We have two deeply divided political parties who put maintaing their internal unity (or the illusion thereof) and electability above everything else. That is to say : The rest of us.
Brexit = All about managing the party. And nothing about governing.
Labour Inaction = All about managing the party. And nothing about governing.

j humphrys
j humphrys
23 days ago

We see more and more experts now “advising” independence. Previously, the general line was the “gradual” approach. But now it’s “save yourselves”. Plaid, Welsh Labour, Gwlad, Greens and, yes, Libs, should prepare a united policy to endorse independence, followed by entry into the single market when possible.

Last edited 23 days ago by j humphrys
Steve Duggan
Steve Duggan
23 days ago

There is no other way to try and reverse the poverty in Wales – the UK is dead – it has to be independence ASAP.

Crwtyn Cemais
Crwtyn Cemais
22 days ago

Beth am yr 80% o Ganghennau Etholaeth Llafur yna’n dod at ei gilydd i ffurfio Plaid newydd…? Neu efallai – rhywbeth haws ond effeithiol: eu haelodau’n ymrwymo i fwrw pleidlais ar gyfer y Blaid sy’n fwya’ debygol o ennill eu Hetholaeth a felly trechu’r Ymgeisydd Toriaidd yn yr Etholiad Cyffredinol nesaf? ~ How about that 80% of Constituency Labour Party branches coming together to form a new Party…? Or maybe, something easier but effective: for their members to commit to voting for the Party most likely to win against the Tory candidate in their constituency at the next General Election?

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