News

Street with the slowest broadband in Wales revealed

01 Dec 2021 3 minutes Read
Photo by John Schnobrich on Unsplash

The street with slowest broadband speed in Wales has been revealed.

According to Uswitch’s annual report the unfortunate title goes to Llys Tripp in Gwaelod-Y-Garth, Cardiff, which has download speeds of 0.34Mbps.

Ernest Doku, a broadband expert at Uswitch.com, said the research shows that parts of Wales are still being “left behind”, adding “it’s not hard to imagine how frustrating such a slow connection must be”.

The comparison and switching service collated and analysed 276,083 consumer speed tests across the UK for its research.

The sluggish broadband in Llys Tripp is a staggering 2,594 times slower than Wales’s fastest street, Haul Fryn in Birchgrove, Swansea, where average download speeds reached 882Mbps over the past year.

For the unfortunate residents of Llys Tripp suffering slow speeds, it would take more than 33 hours to download a two-hour HD film. By contrast, the people of Haul Fryn could download the same film in just 47 seconds.

Wales’ slowest and fastest streets for broadband. Uswitch.com

Haul Fryn is 611Mbps quicker than last year’s fastest street The research suggests that there are improvements in ultrafast broadband infrastructure across Wales with the rollout of full fibre broadband.

Two fifths of UK users (43%) now get superfast speeds of more than 30Mbps, which is almost double than those (22%) six years ago[8]. But despite the fact that superfast broadband is available to 96% of the country, and ultrafast to 62%[4], a recent Uswitch survey found that four in ten (40%) are unaware they can access it in their local area.

‘Left behind’ 

Ernest Doku, broadband expert at Uswitch.com, said: “Wales’s broadband keeps getting quicker every year, but parts of the country continue to be left behind.

“Residents of this year’s fastest street, Haul Fryn, could download a film in 47 seconds – where it would take those living in Llys Tripp more than 33 hours to do the same thing.

“At a time when so many of us rely on our broadband for work, streaming films and TV, and gaming, it’s not hard to imagine how frustrating such a slow connection must be.

“It’s great to witness the increased uptake of ultrafast broadband, but we don’t want to see large swathes of the country left behind on shoddy connections that aren’t cutting it for modern life.

“Initiatives like the Universal Service Obligation and Project Gigabit are helping improve connections at both ends of the spectrum, but there is a lot more to be done so consumers don’t get left behind.

“Of the UK’s ten slowest streets, nine could have access to faster broadband, so we urge residents there — and anyone else unhappy with their broadband speeds — to do a quick search online to see what speeds they could be getting with another provider.”

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
4 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Ex Plaid member
Ex Plaid member
1 month ago

The 1st question should be who in the Welsh Government (incuding Civil Servants) is going to get sacked. These were discussions/activities that should have concluded in 2015 or before.

Peter Cuthbert
Peter Cuthbert
1 month ago

Never min sacking Civil Servants and members of the Government, how about a close look at BT whose activities underpin all this. We have this week experienced speeds of under 0.6Mbs download and 0.2 MBs upload in Aberystwyth along with a huge amount of intermittancy when there is no service. We have complained to our suppier, but nothing much seems to be happening.

Kerry Davies
Kerry Davies
1 month ago
Reply to  Peter Cuthbert

Thatcher wrecked it and there is an article you can search for entitled; “How Thatcher killed the UK’s superfast broadband before it even existed.”
BT and their unions were 100% keen on “glassing the country” and providing every premises with fibre optic cables but there were too many bribes to be had for the Tories to resist.

Ex Plaid member
Ex Plaid member
1 month ago
Reply to  Kerry Davies

Probably one of the worst decisions made in the last 50 years in British Politics.

Feel for you Peter. I have 500mb in the arse end of nowhere, but that is because of OpenReach were amazing. My experience(Don’t get me started) is the problems are not at the OpenReach end, its what the Government and councils do to hold them back.

Our Supporters

All information provided to Nation.Cymru will be handled sensitively and within the boundaries of the Data Protection Act 2018.