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Strong winds from Storm Evert could damage infrastructure, Met Office warns

29 Jul 2021 2 minutes Read
A storm on the way? Picture by Pxhere

Storm Evert will bring a spell of strong to gale force winds which may cause damage to infrastructure and lead to travel disruption, the Met Office has warned.

The weather service says that there will be a spell of windy weather with coastal gales coming into southern parts of Wales and England during Thursday evening onwards through the night into Friday morning.

Gusts of 45 to 55 mph are expected quite widely with a chance of gusts of 60 to 65 mph in the most exposed coastal spots. Parts of Cornwall and Wales will see the highest gusts.

Winds will then ease from the west during Friday morning. Showery rain will accompany these high winds at times, and some of this rain will be heavy.

  • Injuries and danger to life from flying debris are possible
  • Some damage to buildings, such as tiles blown from roofs, could happen. There may also be some fallen trees and damage to temporary outdoor structures is possible
  • Road, rail, air and ferry services may be affected, with longer journey times and cancellations possible
  • Some roads and bridges may close
  • Power cuts may occur, with the potential to affect other services, such as mobile phone coverage
  • Injuries and danger to life could occur from large waves and beach material being thrown onto sea fronts, coastal roads and properties

‘Affected’

The regions and local authorities affected are:

  • Bridgend
  • Caerphilly
  • Cardiff
  • Carmarthenshire
  • Monmouthshire
  • Neath Port Talbot
  • Newport
  • Pembrokeshire
  • Rhondda Cynon Taf
  • Swansea
  • Vale of Glamorgan
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#1Chris
#1Chris
2 months ago

But on the bright side, my geriatric asbo neighbour will not be blaring Broadway musicals and tedious 60s music (IE all 60s music) al day 😊👍

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