Support our Nation today - please donate here
News

Thousands of English 999 calls are being handled by the Welsh Ambulance Service

22 Mar 2023 2 minute read
Ambulances at Morriston Hospital

Thousands of 999 calls are being transferred to the Welsh Ambulance Service because they are taking more than five minutes to answer in England.

More than 50,000 calls – 1.2 per cent of all made – were sent to a different ambulance service than the one intended between October and the middle of February, under a new system of routing unanswered calls was introduced.

It automatically diverts calls which have not been answered after five minutes, rerouting them to services with current capacity, while a BT operator remains on the line until the call is answered.

Responses to an freedom of information request from the Health and Safety Journal revealed the Welsh Ambulance Service took 8,094 calls during that period, while none of its own calls were sent elsewhere.

The Scottish service took 47 calls and had 100 of its own diverted elsewhere, while the Northern Ireland service had 96 calls routed elsewhere but answered none for other services……

More than half of the diverted calls in the four and a half month period took place in December, when ambulance services faced extreme pressure.

South of England

Services in the south of England accounted for most of these, with more than 10,000 transferred from the London Ambulance Service and nearly 6,000 from the South East Coast Ambulance Service in December.

The Welsh Ambulance Service explained it records details from the transferred caller, prioritises the response level and provides lifesaving instructions if required, including having access to a national database of defibrillators.

However, it is unable to despatch ambulances outside its area and does not provide clinical assessment.

Instead the details are transferred electronically into the “home” trust’s computer-aided despatch system.

It added it had not had to expand its call handling capacity to deal with the transferred calls.

NHS England said additional funds had been made available to ambulance trusts from October last year – when the rerouting scheme was introduced – while “internal recharging mechanisms” to cover the cost of responding to diverted calls were developed.


Support our Nation today

For the price of a cup of coffee a month you can help us create an independent, not-for-profit, national news service for the people of Wales, by the people of Wales.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
7 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Cathy Jones
Cathy Jones
11 months ago

What in the name of rubbery f**** is ” “internal recharging mechanisms” to cover the cost of responding to diverted calls were developed” actually meant to mean?!!

….
….and they say Cymraeg is gibberish.

Rhufawn Jones
Rhufawn Jones
11 months ago
Reply to  Cathy Jones

I think it’s newenglishtechnoantilanguagespeak for ‘sending a bill’

Last edited 11 months ago by Rhufawn Jones
GW Atkinson
GW Atkinson
11 months ago

More English incompetence. Someone needs to use this against the Welsh toryscum.

Argol fawr!
Argol fawr!
11 months ago

“They” want our homes, they want our water, now they want our 999 service 😉

Rhufawn Jones
Rhufawn Jones
11 months ago

England would never survive on its own.

Last edited 11 months ago by Rhufawn Jones
Gareth
Gareth
11 months ago
Reply to  Rhufawn Jones

That is the reason why they keep telling us rubbish like, they keep the Celtic country’s afloat, while wanting to deny them independence, because the reality is they are ffd without us. Can you really see the English going without, so we can have.

Brechdan Wncomunco
11 months ago

Ridiculous that Wales is doing England’s work it has always been the same. It is the same with cars they use our facilities to register and tax their cars they should have their own centres not overusing ours.

Our Supporters

All information provided to Nation.Cymru will be handled sensitively and within the boundaries of the Data Protection Act 2018.