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Very Welsh rarebit: Two-thirds in Wales haven’t tried the traditional dish

18 Sep 2021 2 minutes Read
Welsh rarebit picture by Worm That Turned (CC BY-SA 4.0).

A Welsh food historian has warned that some of the British Isles’ traditional foods are disappearing off the menu, as research showed that two-thirds of people in Wales have never tried Welsh rarebit.

Welsh rarebit, a dish consisting of a hot cheese-based sauce served over slices of toasted bread, is becoming increasingly, well, rare, according to research by Aldi.

Only half of people have heard of the Scottish classic neeps and tatties, with that number dropping to as few as a quarter in London, the survey showed. 10 per cent of those surveyed thought that black pudding, Eton mess, and bangers and mash were fictitious foods.

Seren Harrington-Hollins, from Llanidloes, has been researching the origins of some of Britain’s lesser-known delicacies. She said that “our culinary history is rich with stories and delicious dishes”.

However, she expressed surprise at the extent to which some British foods had dropped out of fashion according to Aldi’s poll.

“My work as a food historian means I understand that over time, peoples’ preferences and tastes tend to change, but it was surprising to learn that such a large chunk of people are not au fait with classics such as bangers and mash and toad in the hole,” she said.

The poll also revealed that only 22 per cent of millennials have ever tried a Scotch egg, while 18 per cent think that it is not a real foodstuff.

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Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
1 month ago

Welsh Rarebit on the menu at T H Roberts in Dolgellau…

Philip Jones
Philip Jones
1 month ago

I wonder how many have heard of laverbread, let alone seen it or tasted it. I hope it never becomes popular

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 month ago
Reply to  Philip Jones

Or wild mushrooms. Chop a “chantrelle” , fry with omions, stir-in cream for a sauce.
Very good over fish.

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
1 month ago
Reply to  Philip Jones

A neighbour of mine in the 60’s used to go on his scrambler at low tide to collect the seaweed between Friog and Llwyngwril.

Nigel
Nigel
1 month ago
Reply to  Philip Jones

Two types on sale at Cletwr in Ceredigion!

Y Cymro
Y Cymro
1 month ago
Reply to  Philip Jones

Although laverbread has many health benefits, looks, smells & tastes dreadful. It pains me to say this being a proud Welshman.

Last edited 1 month ago by Y Cymro
CJPh
CJPh
1 month ago
Reply to  Y Cymro

Iesu wen tragwyddol, what is happening to my nation? Not liking bara lawr? What are you, Dutch? 😂

In all seriousness, there are a few of these ‘Marmite’ type traditional dishes and foodstuffs all over the world – natto for instance, a sticky fermented soy bean dish, is well-loved by many Japanese people, loathed by others (tastes OK, smells like death).

Nigel
Nigel
1 month ago

Jane’s amazing rarebit is one of the best sellers at Caffi Cletwr in Tre’r-ddôl

Chef de Parry
Chef de Parry
1 month ago

Obs She has never visited any locally owned Cafe or pub in the north west of Wales , Black Boy in Caernarfon does an excellent interpertation of Rarebit , strictly speaking Rarebit is a savoury ( served after a dessert and coffee for a formal dinner ) for the upper classes or as a late night supper for the middle classes after a theatre or nightclub , or as ‘tea’ for us lesser mortals, add a poached egg it becomes ‘buck’ rarebit, the most pretentious one i have prepared being quails egg on toasted rarebit canapes with perigord truffle in… Read more »

Y Cymro
Y Cymro
1 month ago

Most Welsh blindly eat cheese on toast not knowing it’s a less classier copycat of Welsh Rarebit.

GW Atkinson
GW Atkinson
1 month ago

How about Bara Brith? Absolutely love that stuff.

CJPh
CJPh
1 month ago
Reply to  GW Atkinson

Ever had teisen lap? On its own it’s an awful, dry, crummy dullfest. With a disgled (I sacreligiously choose coffee) it’s amazing. A cake designed solely as an accompaniment for a hot beverage – Starbucks, you listening? 😉

Eifion
Eifion
1 month ago

Never heard of it growing up, only really heard reference to it on English TV, same as calling someone taffy or boyo, so just thought it was some form of derogatory term for cheese on toast.

Shan Morgain
1 month ago

No mention of cawl? My Welsh husband’s cawl is the best in the world. What is served in restaurants is a weak and watery distant cousin. His is solid, a mountain of chopped veg – carrot, swede, onion, potato, whatever he fancies added, herbs, and simmered lamb shank. Marvellous. Hundreds of different recipes.

Y Cymro
Y Cymro
1 month ago
Reply to  Shan Morgain

Real Cawl made fresh is amazing.

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
1 month ago
Reply to  Shan Morgain

Brewys — a Welsh classic from the Gogledd.

Shan Morgain
1 month ago
Reply to  Wrexhamian

Well ours is the Dde tradition.

CJPh
CJPh
1 month ago
Reply to  Shan Morgain

Best in the world, you say? I’d better go check the mynwent, my nan must’ve spun so hard she may have risen up and started a brush fire.

Last edited 1 month ago by CJPh
CJPh
CJPh
1 month ago

Pice fresh off the maen. Caws a winwns is the best hangover food invented. Cockles a bara lawr ‘da cig moch. Salt Marsh lamb. Right, I’m starving now.

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