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Wales should come out of lockdown ‘at different rate to England’ says medical specialist

05 May 2020 4 minutes Read
Photo by Hello I’m Nik on Unsplash

Wales should come out of the lockdown at a different rate to England, one of Wales’ leading medical specialists has said.

Professor Judith Hall, a Cardiff-based consultant anaesthetist, said that the circumstances in Wales were sufficiently unique to need to require a different lockdown timetable to England.

“I don’t think we should act at the same rate as England,” she told the BBC.

“We’ve a different population, we’re older and more rural in general, so I think we should make our own decisions.”

First Minister Mark Drakeford had yesterday called for a “common timetable” agreed between the UK’s four nations for the best way of coming out of the lockdown.

A “four-nation approach” was still the best way to ease the Covid-19 lockdown, he said.

However, Professor Judith Hall said an easing of lockdown restrictions should be done “cautiously”.

“We need to extraordinarily cautious because we really do not yet know enough about this virus – and we’re a long way off beating it,” she said.

“Just because the infection rate and the number of patients being admitted to intensive care are starting to come down, I think we can become far too complacent.”

 

‘Updated’

Today the Welsh Government announced that 21,000 more high-risk patients will receive letters from the Chief Medical Officer advising them to shield.

The majority of these patients had been identified as a result of updated searches of our secondary care systems, they said.

The Chief Medical Officer also recently agreed that all those on kidney dialysis should be advised to shield.

“Updated searches of our primary care system are still being conducted centrally and may identify further patients,” Vaughan Gething, Minister for Health and Social Services, said.

“We anticipate this process will be completed this week and any further patients identified will also receive a letter from the Chief Medical Officer.

“The list of high-risk conditions is under constant review and we are following the latest scientific and medical advice to ensure we have identified and contacted everyone who needs to be shielding.

“Given the severe nature of the measures those who are shielding must take – self-isolation for 12 weeks which includes reducing all non-essential contact with other household members – it is important only those are classed as high risk are added to it.

“In line with the initial 12-week shielding advice issued in late March, the latest letters advise people to shield until at least 15 June 2020.

“GPs will be provided with an updated list of their patients who have been identified centrally and will remain able to identify and add further patients. This will include English-border GP practices with Welsh resident patients. Secondary Care Clinicians/Specialists will be provided with the updated Welsh Shielded Patient List and will also now be able to identify and add further patients.

“Local authorities and the major food retailers will receive the updated Welsh Shielded Patient List at the same time so that the additional people identified can access the support being provided.”

Photo by iMattSmart on Unsplash

‘Counselling’

Meanwhile the Welsh Conservatives’ Shadow Minister for Social Care – Janet Finch-Saunders MS – has today urged the Welsh Government to provide better mental health support to social care workers who may lose residents as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In a Written Assembly Question to the Minister for Health and Social Care, Vaughan Gething MS, Mrs Finch-Saunders asked:

“What steps is the Minister taking to promote counselling sessions or access to advice networks for social care workers who have lost residents to COVID-19?”

Speaking on the subject, Janet Finch-Saunders said she had been struck by the great emotional toll that the COVID-19 pandemic was having on carers.

“The care home setting is a special workplace where many genuine and lasting relationships are forged,” she said. “Often, staff care for their residents as they were family.

“Given the tragic level of deaths occurring in our care homes, the Welsh Government must do more to protect the emotional and mental well-being of our social care staff. The risk that the current situation will overwhelm our carers, leading to mental burnout, remains far too high.

“Continued communication is paramount. By providing social care workers with access to counselling or advice networks, we can ensure that our valiant front-line staff feel adequately supported through this most challenging of periods.”

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John Ellis
John Ellis
1 year ago

I suspect there may be plausible reasons for arguing that not just Wales as a whole but specific areas within Wales – and within the other countries as well – should contemplate coming out of lock-down at different rates. Different parts the world are at very different places in the progress of the infection.

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
1 year ago
Reply to  John Ellis

.. and that in itself is the big problem. How do you stop people moving around between lockdown and non-lockdown zones ? I can see our favourite topic – 2nd home owners and caravaners – returning in force if lockdown eased in say the West Midlands regardless of the situation in Gwynedd. Or would you seal the borders ?

jones
jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Huw Davies

Seal the borders,get the message across that the are not welcome,until it safe to visit once more.If they don’t comply,tazer them all and ship them back in a cattle truck and impound their vehicles.Their’s enough second home owners here,as it is,we don’t want anymore of the parasites ,which could end up killing more of the vulnerable and elderly.

John Ellis
John Ellis
1 year ago
Reply to  Huw Davies

As far as second homes and caravans are concerned that could be done by requiring people to remain in their main home – interpreted as the one where they were living during the period of lock-down – for as long as their own local lock-down continued. Though I agree that, especially across the summer, there’d be a problem of people living in areas still locked down launching out on days out to places where the restrictions had been eased. But I think we’re stuck with that problem whatever the strategy, because even in the event of the lock-down being eased… Read more »

E Williams
E Williams
1 year ago
Reply to  John Ellis

There’s already a requirement for 2nd home owners to stay at their main residency, the First Minister said so. However you’d never have guessed it around our way in Snowdonia. Isolated caravans occupied, summer houses with 4 vehicles parked in the drives and even 15 cars parked around an Eco Retreat Centre.

So if the authorities can’t/won’t enforce it presently, there’ll be no chance for Gwynedd or rural areas lagging other regions. Even if we’re three weeks behind on the Covid curve.

John Ellis
John Ellis
1 year ago
Reply to  E Williams

The difficulty appears to be that there’s a legal power for police to stop cars in transit to check point of origin and purpose of journey, and if it turns out that they’re heading to second homes.the officer can compel them to turn round, on pain of a fine. But if the second home owners are lucky enough to reach their second home without being appehended on the way, it seems there’s no legal power to compel them to leave a property which they legitimately own or rent. My suggestion is that in present circumstances this is an anomaly which… Read more »

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 year ago

“Make our own decisions”.

Plain citizen
Plain citizen
1 year ago

I wonder why Prof Hall wants to reference us to England? The key should be what’s right for a particular area so lets hear it from her when she thinks it should be lifted in a rural area and for (say) Cardiff. I’m fed up of pontificating public employees with virtually no relevant expertise (she’s an anaesthetist) waffling. If she thinks lockdown should last for another 10 weeks or stop immediately, say so.

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