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Welsh dog rescue centre sees 47% increase in dogs coming into their care amid cost of living crisis

27 Nov 2023 3 minute read
Bobby & Fluke. Both waiting for homes at Many Tears

A steep increase in the number of dogs being abandoned or surrendered to animal shelters has been blamed on the ‘skyrocketing’ cost of living crisis.

One Welsh charity, Llanelli-based Many Tears Animal Rescue, which focuses primarily on rehoming ex-breeding dogs, has recorded a 47% increase in dogs coming into their care compared to the same time frame in 2020.

According to the charity, more and more dogs are ending up in shelters through no fault of their own due to rising pet prices amid the cost of living crisis. According to the charity, shelters across the UK have been pushed to breaking point.

During 2022, the rescue centre took more than 3,300 dogs and puppies into their care, a 40% jump from the previous year, but this year’s figures have been unprecedented.

Despite times being tougher than ever for rescues across the UK, interest in adopting dogs has fallen over recent years. Based on search data from 2022, searches for ‘adopt a dog’ are down 41% from historic highs in 2020. 

According to Google search data, between 2018 to 2022, people are still far more likely to look into buying a dog over adopting one, with UK search trends showing that there were nine times as many searches for buying a dog over adopting. This means sheltered dogs may end up waiting longer to be adopted, and shelters like Many Tears are feeling the strain. 

Porche & Marshmallow. Both waiting for homes at Many Tears

During the winter months, there are additional heating demands on rescues. At Many Tears, most puppies and their mothers require heat lamps to stay warm as the temperature drops. The rising cost for heating has taken a toll on the rescue and their day to day routine.

To support their local rescue on Giving Tuesday, British luxury dog brand, Ralph & Co has donated a selection of dog beds and blankets to the shelter, to help keep ex-breeding dogs and puppies across Wales comfortable while they wait for adoption.

Rhys Evans from Ralph & Co, who are supporting the charity as part of Giving Tuesday, commented: “We wanted the dogs in the shelter to have warm and comfortable beds to sleep in this Christmas as they wait for their new homes. Our nest beds are designed to help dogs with anxiety, making them great for calming dogs and puppies in shelters.”

Sylvia Van Atta, founder of Many Tears Animal Rescue said: “We have 430 dogs in our care currently, in foster homes and in our kennels. The cost of living crisis has had a direct knock on effect for pets across the UK. Loved and unloved dogs are being given up as families split, lose homes, or simply cannot afford the cost of caring for their pet.”

Urging everyone to consider adopting pets instead of increasing their demand through buying them from breeders, she added: “Rescues like ours are bursting at the seams, and staff are having to turn away dogs on a regular basis. Please consider visiting your local rescue if you’re looking for a new dog, there are so many beautiful dogs in need of a quiet place to call home.”


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SundanceKid
SundanceKid
3 months ago

The problem is that the process of adopting a dog is made unneccessarily harder than it needs to be. I’ve known people whose gardens are not deemed “large enough” to have been rejected. Also, rescue organisations don’t seem to like households with children or other pets. I knew someone who lived alone and worked from home who was told that she was “not suitable” despite owning dogs previously. If these organisations are serious about rehoming these animals, they need to work with applicants, not against them. It is heartbreaking and simply inexcusable to allow dogs to suffer when there are… Read more »

Pippa
Pippa
3 months ago
Reply to  SundanceKid

I am of the same opinion, SundanceKid has said it All.

Onthedogsside
Onthedogsside
3 months ago
Reply to  Pippa

Perhaps they want to ensure the same issue that brought them there doesn’t happen again. The vast majority of dog owners think they know what dogs need – without having done any research into canines at all. Having had one before is not research, it is experience of having one dog – likely from a small puppy – which adapts to the family and make people think they understand dogs. The vast majority of homes are not suitable for dogs. It is not the rescue centre’s fault they want every dog to go to the best home possible, not just… Read more »

Carol
Carol
3 months ago
Reply to  SundanceKid

Yep same here spent 4 hrs wasting time going through application to be told unsuitable having met the dog etc etc and having 3 rescues from another place previously…..not wanting to fund puppy trades an also rescue dogs are work in progress and are more grateful when they gain your trust….what a joke now trying to rescue….but they want your money but dont want you to have a dog ??

Susyq
Susyq
3 months ago

Some people don’t realise how big some dogs can get then it gets to expensive for them and then the poor dog has to go so it’s easy don’t buy one go to a rescue centre first .

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