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Welsh Government confirm they will crack on with holiday let tax hikes

24 May 2022 4 minute read
Left, Welsh Government’s Finance Minister Rebecca Evans. Right, Abersoch, which is popular with second home owners. Picture by Ken Doerr (CC BY 2.0).

The Welsh Government have confirmed that they will crack on with tax hikes on holiday lets that do not rent out their properties for more than half the year.

Following a consultation, Finance Minister Rebecca Evans said that she did “recognise the strength of feeling among self-catering operators” but would not be changing the planned law changes.

Some holiday let owners had argued that become unviable if planned law changes go ahead next year.

From April local authorities will be able to set council tax premiums on second homes and long-term empty properties to 300% from April 2023.

The criteria for self-catering accommodation being liable for business rates instead of council tax will also change at the same time, from 70 to 182 days. This will stop second home owners from classifying homes as businesses because they are let out for one fifth of the year.

“As part of the Co-operation Agreement with Plaid Cymru, we are committed to taking immediate action to address the impact of second homes and unaffordable housing in communities across Wales, using the planning, property and taxation systems,” Rebecca Evans said.

“As we continue to progress the package of measures and drawing on the latest evidence base, we will keep under constant review the whole range of levers available to use and how they may be deployed most effectively to meet our policy objectives and avoid any unintended consequences.”

She added that “I recognise the strength of feeling among self-catering operators and have listened to the representations from individual businesses and industry representative bodies.

“There is limited evidence available in relation to some of these considerations and I am grateful to the sector for providing additional information they have gathered from their members.

“This has been taken into account in completing the Explanatory Memorandum and Regulatory Impact Assessment, which makes use of the available evidence. I recognise that the stronger criteria may be challenging for some operators to meet.

“The purpose of the change is to help ensure property owners are making a fair contribution to local communities, for example by increasing their contribution to the local economy through greater letting activity or by paying council tax on their properties.”

‘Anti-tourism’

Yesterday a tourism industry body has said that there are renewed concerns about the Welsh Government’s steps to legislate on the subject of holiday homes and lets as well as a proposed tourism tax as the staycation boom seen in Wales during the pandemic begins to dissipate.

The Welsh Association of Visitor Attractions said that 46.9% of members they surveyed had seen fewer visitors over the 2022 Easter period when compared with 2019, the last time all attractions were open over Easter.

Those suggested that those who had stayed in Wales during the pandemic were now back jetting off on foreign trips. They also suggested that potential tourists may be feeling the pinch of the cost of living crisis.

Ashford Price, Secretary of WAVA and the owner of Dan yr Ogof Cavs, said that members were concerned that the Welsh Government were pursuing “anti-tourism policies” such as a proposed tourism tax and plans to make it harder for holiday let properties to be eligible for business rates instead of council tax.

“All attractions are facing increased running costs, especially for items like electricity, staffing costs and rising food prices,” he said.

“Many members are finding it difficult to pass on these extra costs knowing that families are struggling themselves with cost-of-living issues, therefore days out with the family must continue to be affordable.

“The overall picture indicated by some attractions is that the weekly footfall is down, and though the weekends are holding up these numbers are not covering the fewer visitors seen in the week.”


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Cymru Cymraeg
Cymru Cymraeg
6 months ago

Fantastic news…….better late than never!

Owen Jones
Owen Jones
6 months ago

Absolutely based

GW Atkinson
GW Atkinson
6 months ago

Good, that means houses will be available for people living here.

Cynan
Cynan
6 months ago

Good. Glad the usual whiners didn’t derail this great idea

Steve George
Steve George
6 months ago

Excellent!

Richard
Richard
6 months ago

This direction of travel ( no pun intended) can be found in Scotland 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 plus Celtic cousins in Cornwall and the Lakes of England plus parts of Yorkshire and their Peak District. To try and pretend it’s an anti English thing doesn’t stack up…… Second homes and holiday taxes have even more support in St Ives than St Asaph and Penzance over Porthmadog. Hollowed out villages and sky high prices caused by city weekend hurray Henry’s is the norm in coastal Kernow The difference however is if you go to a meeting of Consel an Kernow and listen the their… Read more »

Mickey
Mickey
6 months ago

This will make very little difference to the housing situation yes some will have to pay very high council tax but they can make that from letting a few weeks over summer. If you think 3 bed houses in Abersoch will now become available for £50k you are unfortunately very much mistaken. This is a sap to Plaid by Drakesford and will soon be apparent to all

SundanceKid
SundanceKid
6 months ago
Reply to  Mickey

No one thinks they will be available for £50,000 but you are wrong to think they can let out for a few werks during the summer.

The business tax criteria now stipulates you must rent out for a minimum of 6.5 months a year or face increased council tax premiums. I expect Anglesey, Gwynedd, Ceredigon and Carmarthen will eventually charge the 300% increased rate. Other areas may do the same, especially those with Labour run councils.

Why should those with second homes get a benefit in the form of business tax relief that the rest of us don’t get?

Cynan
Cynan
6 months ago
Reply to  Mickey

*sop

Dai Rob
Dai Rob
6 months ago

Good stuff. Crack on bois! 😉

Mr Williams
Mr Williams
6 months ago

👏👏👏👏

SundanceKid
SundanceKid
6 months ago

Well done Welsh Government for doing what is right for our communities.

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