Welsh Government urge public to use new app tracking coronavirus symptoms in Wales

Persistent cough as reported by COVID Symptom Trackers

First Minister Mark Drakeford and NHS Wales are appealing to the Welsh public to download a new coronavirus Symptom Tracker app to help the NHS response to COVID-19 in Wales.

People across Wales are being asked to log their daily symptoms to help build a clearer picture of how the virus is affecting people. The app is for everyone, not just those who are experiencing symptoms.

The app is available to download from the Apple App Store and Google Play from the links at covid.joinzoe.com. Daily symptom maps and other content are available via https://covid.joinzoe.com/blog.

Developed by researchers at King’s College London and healthcare science company, ZOE, the COVID-19 Symptom Tracker is already being used by more than 38,000 people in Wales, and over 2 million across the UK.

People are using the app to track their daily health and any potential COVID-19 symptoms. It is also being used by healthcare and hospital workers.

Data from the COVID-19 Symptom Tracker app will be shared daily with the Welsh Government and NHS Wales. It will give early indications of where future hospital admissions are going to be.

Scientists from Kings College London and the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank at Swansea University will work with the Welsh Government to analyse the data to inform modelling and understand and predict the developing situation of the disease in Wales.

‘Terrible disease’

First Minister, Mark Drakeford said: “Having a range of evidence and data is crucial in helping us build a clear picture of how the virus is behaving and affecting everyone’s lives. Crucially this app can help us anticipate potential COVID hot spots and get our NHS services ready.

“I’m asking everyone in Wales to download the new COVID Symptom Tracker app, so you can help protect our workers and save lives. Together we can build the best scientific picture so we are better armed to fight this terrible disease.”

The research team at King’s College London and ZOE are analysing the data to generate new insights about the disease. An interactive map allowing anyone to see the distribution of COVID in their area is available at covid.joinzoe.com as well as frequent science updates.

Lead researcher Professor Tim Spector from King’s College London, says: “Accurate real-time data is essential if we are to beat this disease. Without accurate and wide spread testing it’s essential that we have much data as possible to help us predict where we are going to see the next spikes in demand so that resources can be effectively deployed ahead of time to meet the needs of the patients.

“The support of the Welsh Government and NHS Wales is an incredibly positive step in the right direction and we hope to see other NHS groups coming on board in the coming days.

“We would like to take this opportunity to thank every single person who is already participating, and would urge everyone else to download the app and check in every day, whether you are experiencing any symptoms or feeling fine.”

Yesterday it was reported that 315 people have died with coronavirus in hospitals in Wales. 8,114 have died in England and 92 in Northern Ireland. 495 have died in Scotland, which also counts deaths outside hospitals.

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jones
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jones

In some ways i think it might be useful,however with the changes in the law,you could be dragged from your house, if your showing, flue or cold symptoms and put in quarantine and therefore exposing yourself to more danger.Self isolate, in your home, is the best in my view and call the required numbers if things get worse.

jones
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jones
Simon Gruffydd
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“this terrible disease.” Is those the actual words from Mark Drakeford? Indeed, all diseases are bad, but as the data emerges it has become evident that this newest coronavirus is no worse than the common flu – less contagious according to the WHO, and with a similar effect and death toll to the common flu. If you want to see what the real experts are saying, visit: https://wethepeople.wales/ BTW, dying “with” coronavirus is not the same as dying FROM coronavirus.

Kerry Davies
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Kerry Davies

Will you stop lying and spreading fake news. This idiotic and puerile cherry picking is highly dangerous. I note that you still have not amended the falsehoods and inaccuracies on that website and neither have you revealed just who is “wethepeople”.

jones
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jones

I agree, there some devious agendas, behind this hysteria,it’s a nasty virus,no doubt,continue maintaining good hygiene and social distancing,i agree with! but let us not get blinded, by the extensive freedom we’ve given up,during this time
It’s up,to the individual ,if they’re willing to wake up or not.

Jonathan Gammond
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Jonathan Gammond

The link makes interesting and thought-provoking reading and we all know how the media and politicians live in a weird self-perpetuating bubble. However, even with the measures in place, we have already passed the 8,000 deaths from the virus and the majority have been the over 65s. Moreover, we will be in a position (should we choose to do so) to learn a huge amount from this experience: the NHS cannot react to crises if we run it on 95% occupancy rates on grounds of efficiency; our manufacturing base and shorter supply chains are vital national interests; international cooperation is… Read more »

David Owen
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David Owen

wethepeople.wales registered in Panama with no address.

John Ellis
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John Ellis

Might this be a further instance – the first being Mr Drakeford jumping the gun on prolonging the lockdown – of the WG coming up with an initiative which isn’t precisely synchronized with those emanating from Westmister?