News

Owner of former home of ex-Plaid MP denies replacing its Welsh name with English one

29 Sep 2021 3 minutes Read
The village of Talgarreg

The owner of the former home of an ex-Plaid Cymru MP has denied replacing its name, after changing marketing materials to a new English name.

Language campaigner Cynog Dafis used to live in Crugyreryr Uchaf in Talgarreg, in Ceredigion, with his wife Llinos, has written to the current owners to outline his concerns.

The name Upper Eagle Farm is being used in marketing material to advertise a glamping site registered at the address.

But the owner says the name of the property itself has not been changed, and that the address is still registered as Crugyreryr Uchaf.

However, Cynog Dafis has warned that the replacement of Welsh place names with English ones is a “threat to the identity of the nation” and has written to the owners of what is now a glamping site to urge them to reconsider.

He has warned that the replacement of Welsh place names with English ones is a “threat to the identity of the nation”, and has written to the owners of what is now a glamping site to urge them to reconsider the name change.

In an open letter that has also been sent to Ceredigion County Council as well as to the local community council, in a bid to attract support, Cynog and Llinos explained that the Welsh language place name was to be found on maps as far back as the Middle Ages, and that it was an “act of cultural vandalism” to replace it with an English one.

The meaning of “crug” is hillock, and the name Crugyreryr Uchaf refers to a high and steep hillock that was behind the house before the days of the quarry, said Cynog Dafis. The hillock was formed in the ice age, over 10,000 years ago.

The word “eryr” has a number of meanings, including eagle, but is understood to mean highlands in this instance – as is to be found in Eryri.

‘Anguish’ 

The letter said “As previous residents of Crugeryr Uchaf it is a source of anguish (though not a shock) to know that you gave the place an English name.

“Over the 38 years we were in Crugeryr Uchaf it was a source of pride that we lives in a place with such a dignified name.

“It is important for you to know how ancient and significant this name is. It is to be found on maps from the Middle Ages, which means it goes back even further – at least a millennium, which goes back to the period when Wales was formed as a nation. Ever since then the residents of Ceredigion used the name with pride.

“It is an act of cultural vandalism to put an English name in its place, even in a bilingual form you have, we understand, you have adopted.”

The letter added: “Unfortunately your act is part of a wider pattern. Across Wales original Welsh names are being replaces with English names. To a large extent, place names define Wales’ landscape.

“The increasing habit of replacing Welsh names with English ones is therefore a threat to the identity of the nation. When English people, and other people from the outside, move to Wales to live, the least we have the right to expect is for them to respect the linguistic heritage of their new home”.

15 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
sue.jones davies
sue.jones davies
23 days ago

Rhaid i Lywodraeth Cymru weithredu i atal ein hanes rhag diflannu o flaen ein llygaid.
This way of weakening our identity and culture has to be prevented.

O Rob
O Rob
23 days ago

Plaid Cymru did try to introduce a bill to protect all historical place names in Cymru, whether Welsh, English or any other language. But, predictably, our unionist friends labour and tories voted it down.
To expect these 2 uk parties to do anything positive on behalf of Cymru and it’s people is utterly pointless. Unless both are thrown out and a pro Cymru party voted in our country’s painful demise will continue

Mawkernewek
23 days ago

If people really want to stick a sign with a silly name on their house, or advertise a holiday let business with “Holibobs Retreat” or something then they should be allowed to do so, but they should not be allowed to change a historic placename to something else on the official record, which will then be used by Ordnance Survey, and any number of mapping apps etc.

Do we know whether this is an official change of name or just someone putting up a sign or advertising on a website?

Hannergylch
Hannergylch
23 days ago
Reply to  Mawkernewek

The front page of their web site (glampingwestwales dot co dot uk) has “Crug Yr Eryr Uchaf” once in normal sized text as part of the postal address, near the foot of the page — implying that it’s the name of the village. The phrase “Upper Eagle Farm” occurs 5 times, of which 3 are in large font and one is in bold font.

There’s no Cymraeg version of the page, so no clues as to what name they think their neighbours (or indeed Welsh-speaking visitors) should use.

Steve
Steve
23 days ago
Reply to  Hannergylch

Thanks for the link
Not a word of Welsh on their website, it states that they moved to Wales to setup a glamping site because they love it so much – though evidently not its ancient language or culture.

Time to make full use of the ‘feedback’ link on their website.

Hannergylch
Hannergylch
23 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Yes, constructive feedback could be the way to win them over. Their web site is still under construction, so it’s only fair to give them a chance to get off to a good start. For instance, tipping them off about the wackiness of Google Welsh, and encouraging them to make use of the Welsh government’s Helo Blod free business translation service. I don’t hang out with people who are into ‘glamping’, so I’m out on a limb here, but ‘glampers’ probably see themselves as being more cultured than the customers of ”British Fish & Chips” in Benidorm. You could therefore… Read more »

arthur owen
23 days ago

Please try and stick to grammatical correctness,Cynog Dafis is a former Plaid Cymru MP not an ex MP.

Stephen Owen
Stephen Owen
23 days ago

Colonialism, the name should be changed back as soon as possible. Cymru am byth 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

Kerry Davies
Kerry Davies
23 days ago

Normally one needs permission from the local council and that of the Post Office/Royal Mail to change a long-established house name. Farms are often bound by some form of covenant or agricultural registration which makes it more difficult. I wonder if they informed Ordnance Survey which has an OSNames database that would need alteration?

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
23 days ago

Glamping says it all…I’m guessing there is a Ganol and an Isaf too

Huw Prys Jones
Huw Prys Jones
23 days ago

This is a far greater concern than the name of a single dwelling. It is a symptom of a mass migration of English people taking over some of the most cherished parts of Wale and walking all over the native population. It is also a direct attack on diversity, for if diversity is to mean anything, our own culture should also be recognised and respected as part of that diversity. Our message to these people must be unequivocal: If you want an English name to your home, go back to your own country.

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
23 days ago

One problem I foresee for the name change. The royal mail postcode finder only lists Crugyreryr Uchaf and Crugyreryr Isaf. No Upper or Lower Eagle Farm. Presumably anyone trying to find the house using Satnav will still need to know the original Welsh name to find the correct Crugyreryr. This may be the reason the new owners have still got the original name displayed!

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
23 days ago
Reply to  Huw Davies

If I was the local postman/woman I would not be able to find the place…

The essence of Wales is in place and field names going back a thousand years and more and should be protected like ancient monuments are.

Mr Drakeford reverse the previous ruling if you please !

Last edited 23 days ago by Mab Meirion
hdavies15
hdavies15
22 days ago
Reply to  Huw Davies

Even more difficult to find when reduced to pile of ashes !

Cofi gwlad
22 days ago

TRIPAVISOR.
This is not the place to stay to experience WELSH heritage or history as the owners seem to be eroding the very fabric of this true WELSH property.

Our Supporters

All information provided to Nation.Cymru will be handled sensitively and within the boundaries of the Data Protection Act 2018.