Support our Nation today - please donate here
News

Yr Wyddfa: Snowdon to be known by Welsh name from now on after national park vote

16 Nov 2022 3 minute read
Yr Wyddfa. The image is released free of copyrights under Creative Commons CC0.

The English name of Snowdon for Wales’ highest mountain will be replaced by the Welsh name of Yr Wyddfa, following a vote today.

Snowdonia National Park Authority committee members voted to use the Welsh names of Eryri (Snowdonia) and Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) in both Welsh and English contexts. 

A five thousand-strong petition calling on the National Park Authority to formalise the authority’s use of the Welsh names Eryri and Yr Wyddfa boosted it to take decisive action. 

The petition was instigated in response to a proposal by Councillor John Pughe Roberts for the authority to cease to use the English names Snowdon and Snowdonia. 

The proposal was rejected at that time on the basis that a group had already been established to look at the use of place names.

Dr Dylan Foster Evans of Cardiff University was commissioned by the Place Names Task and Finish Group to compile a series of principles for use as guidance when referring to geographical names in the Eryri / Snowdonia National Park.

Naomi Jones, Head of Cultural Heritage at the Snowdonia National Park Authority said: “Many public bodies across Wales have moved to use both the Welsh and English names, or the Welsh name only, when referring to Yr Wyddfa and Eryri, as have many of the mainstream English-language press and filming companies.

“This is very encouraging, and gives us confidence that this change in the authority’s approach will be accepted for the benefit of the Welsh language and as a mark of respect to our cultural heritage.

“We have historic names in both languages, but we are eager to consider the message we wish to convey about place names, and the role they have to play in our current cultural heritage by promoting the Welsh language as one of the National Park’s special qualities.

“The National Park’s statutory purposes denotes the requirement to protect and enhance our cultural heritage and provide opportunities for people to learn about and enjoy the special qualities.  By referring to our most renowned landmarks by their Welsh names we give people from all over the world the opportunity to engage with the Welsh language and its rich culture.”

Welsh move

A move towards using the Welsh names in English context started a few years ago, with many of the authority’s English version of publications and digital communications media using the names Eryri and Yr Wyddfa, with a reference to the English names in brackets to follow.

The Welsh and English names for the authority are set in law, so it will be a legal requirement for the authority to continue to use its English name alongside the Welsh on statutory documents.


Support our Nation today

For the price of a cup of coffee a month you can help us create an independent, not-for-profit, national news service for the people of Wales, by the people of Wales.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

27 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Y Tywysog Lloegr a Moscow
Y Tywysog Lloegr a Moscow
9 days ago

Excellent news. The first of many reclaiming of our place names. Excited to see the Daily Torygraph have an emotional collapse over this. ARTie is gonna have an embolism. Oh happy days!

Ynys Môn, Ynys Enlli and Ynys Bŷr in the next wave perhaps?

I.Humphrys
I.Humphrys
9 days ago

Yes!

Rhufawn Jones
Rhufawn Jones
9 days ago
Reply to  I.Humphrys

And ‘Cymru’!

George Bodley
George Bodley
9 days ago

About bleddy time dump all English names in Wales asap

Llefain
Llefain
9 days ago

Good
It’s a start

Fi yn unig
Fi yn unig
9 days ago

I remember Tudor Owen on the Jeremy Vine show talking about this and callers in England giving it the thumbs down as though we had just made up an alternative name for it. The name of the mountain is Yr Wyddfa and was a very long time before someone felt they had the right to stamp their own name on it and eradicate the real one. This starts to reverse that abuse. Now, what’s next? There’s a great deal more to do,

Karl
Karl
9 days ago

Don’t translate names, fantastic news. You visit a country for its language and culture. Tourists don’t like, then they are not wanted, they won’t respect us on a visit here.

Brian Clement
Brian Clement
9 days ago

Ardderchog!

Frank
Frank
9 days ago

Gallwch ddychmygu’r Sais yn ceisio ynganu hyn. “Eeer Widffa” yw’r agosaf y bydda nw’n gallu cyflawni dwi’n credu.

Last edited 9 days ago by Frank
notimejeff
notimejeff
9 days ago

Mae’n hen bryd.

Owain Morgan
Owain Morgan
9 days ago

Dyma’r Cymru. Mae’n Gymraeg.

A Jones
A Jones
9 days ago

Onid oes modd newid deddf i gynnwys yr enw Cymraeg yn unig?

Alwyn Jones
Alwyn Jones
9 days ago

Ydyn ni’n cael gwared â’r ‘Nameless Cwm’ ac erchyllterau tebyg ar fapiau’r AO ?

Connoisseur of Understatement
Connoisseur of Understatement
9 days ago
Reply to  Alwyn Jones

Dylsen ni — dyw’r Nameless Cwm ddim yn ddienw o gwbl! Cwm Cneifion yw e.

David
David
9 days ago

Remember the BBC “Have I Got News For You” with Alexander Armstrong about Snowdon jokes.

George Thomas
George Thomas
9 days ago

I saw a comment that said it makes more sense to use Eryri and Snowdon based on historical origins.

I don’t think we can say this is totally taking names back to their routes, and we probably won’t see positive impact of this for 25+ years but it will come.

Y Tywysog Lloegr a Moscow
Y Tywysog Lloegr a Moscow
9 days ago
Reply to  George Thomas

I’ve heard such comments. Mainly from English people. I’ll take our names every time on the basis that this is our land. Cymru literally means “our land”. Even if the Saeson name were older than our name, even if our name name were brand new, we get to name our own stuff.

Mr Williams
Mr Williams
9 days ago

Ardderchog!

Mr Williams
Mr Williams
9 days ago
Reply to  Mr Williams

Now let’s also drop ridiculous names like Rhos-on-Sea and Llantwit too.

Riki
Riki
9 days ago

Very Good and rational decision. What sort of self respecting nation sacrifices its own language on the alter of Better relations with its neighbouring country. The British language is still here!

Y Cymro
Y Cymro
9 days ago

Wonderful news! Yr Wyddfa like it’s Australian Aborigine counterpart Uluru has been culturally liberated. I look forward to the day when the name Wales & Welsh are also consigned to history and we return to our native British name for our country Cymru and we refer to ourselves as Cymry as we are not foreigners in our own land but the original native people of this island. .

Last edited 9 days ago by Y Cymro
The Original Mark
The Original Mark
8 days ago
Reply to  Y Cymro

Turkey has recently changed the spelling of it’s name to Türkiye and Kiev has changed to Kyiv, and in Kiev’s case according to the western media it’s a defiant and important symbol of a fight against oppression, I would suggest it’s within the Senedd’s power to tell the rest of the world we are Cymru.

Ursula Waldinger
Ursula Waldinger
9 days ago

Syniad dda. Rwy’n hoffi clwyed iethoid Cymraeg.

John Roberts
John Roberts
8 days ago

Whatever you call our highest point it would be well to ensure that the photo labelled with its name is actually a photo of it.

Richard Thomas
Richard Thomas
8 days ago

It’s unfortunate though that the name will now be absolutely shredded through mispronunciation, like the “Carneddow” and “Cadair Burwin”; we’ll soon have “Yer Widdfer” and other nonsense. Personally I’d rather have kept both names and kept Yr Wyddfa for those who can say it properly, but that’s just my opinion and I’m sure others will feel different.

Eifion
8 days ago

Da iawn wir cefnogaeth i’r Gymraeg Eryri a Chyngor Gwynedd. Dowch I lawr o ben y mynydd na a dechrau wrth eich traed Mrs cadeirydd cyngor cymuned llanbedr a chyngor cymuned harlech popeth yn Gymraeg?teg edrych tuag adre ia .Da iawn John Puw

Emrys Jones
Emrys Jones
8 days ago

Bendigedig. Growing up in Blaenau Ffestiniog on the edge of the Eryri massif we always referred to Yr Wyddfa and Eryri, They are evocative names whereas Snowdon and Snowdonia are bland, p**s weak names that could apply to any mountain range that gets snowed on.

Our Supporters

All information provided to Nation.Cymru will be handled sensitively and within the boundaries of the Data Protection Act 2018.