Bringing the first Cardiff International Film Festival to life

Picture by MuffInn (CC BY 2.0)

Rahil Abbas

Wales was and is a land of mystery, magic and music.  Now a 21st century country renowned for a commitment to technology, training and its people.  A country of ever-increasing originality, opportunity and welcome.

It is no throwaway comment that “there is a welcome in the Valleys” but an actual statement of intent by the Welsh people, who, as a whole, welcome peoples to their country, from around the world, to share their good fortune.

With the ongoing development of Wales, more and more people throughout the world are becoming aware of Wales and its potential.

Striving to become a world leader in innovation, continued effort in developing a modern technological based economy remains at the forefront of the Welsh Government’s ongoing economic planning.

The outstanding natural beauty of Wales and the technical experience of its workforce is shown in the ongoing development of the film and TV industry in Wales.

With new film studios having arrived and continuing to be developed, Wales is rapidly becoming a world leader in film and TV production, merely one strand of the continued Welsh economic development.

From this welcome from the Welsh people and an abiding interest and love of the film industry, my dream of bringing an international film festival to his adoptive country has led to the inaugural Cardiff International Film Festival being brought to Cardiff.

Centred at the historic Pierhead Building in Cardiff Bay – along with screenings at the Odeon and Vue cinemas – the event takes place this weekend, culminating in a glittering awards ceremony at Wales Millennium Centre.

More details about the festival can be found here.

Diverse

The aim of Cardiff International Film Festival is to allow a wider audience to become part of the Welsh dream.

By bringing together film-makers from around the world, the festival aims to encourage them to use the platform to showcase their dreams.

Through the medium of film, people across the globe can experience different and diverse cultures and what better setting than the historic dockside at Cardiff Bay with its thriving social and commercial vibe, all whilst being within easy walking distance of Central Cardiff and all its amenities.

The film festival will bring the rich world of film together with the exciting, historical culture of Wales, as well as building on Cardiff’s more recent forays into world sport.

Already known to world sports fans through its association with golf, football and of course, rugby, the Festival adds a further string to the Welsh bow.

Bringing even more renown to Wales, it is fully intended for the festival to become an annual event and an important date within the worldwide filming community’s diary.

The resulting increase in footfall to the Welsh economy will be a benefit to all.

Through further introducing Wales to the world, it is anticipated that the ongoing interest in the country will lead it to become a ‘must visit’ on any world traveller’s itinerary with the ongoing benefit to Welsh tourism.

By elevating Wales in the mindset of film-makers, the ongoing opportunity for the Welsh film industry is enhanced in bringing even more film production to Wales, an opportunity that the industry will no doubt readily seize with both hands.

A very warm and generous Celtic welcome is extended to all attendees and participants of Cardiff International Film Festival, alike, in this, its inaugural year.

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glasiad
Guest
glasiad

“It is no throwaway comment that “there is a welcome in the Valleys” but an actual statement of intent by the Welsh people, who, as a whole, welcome peoples to their country, from around the world, to share their good fortune.” The Valleys ARE probably the most welcoming place in Wales. The Valleys are also the most autochthonous part of Wales. Around 90% of us were born in the area we live. (I am an exception being born in Cardiff). There is a connection there. With too much diversity social cohesion is lost, and the welcome mat gets rolled up.… Read more »

sibrydionmawr
Guest

Whilst your comment is strictly accurate in terms of the times we are living in, and the Valleys are indeed the ‘most autochthonous part of Wales’, it wasn’t always thus, as there was hardly any population there until the development of the coalfields from the 1860s onwards, which demanded labour to such an extent that it couldn’t be satisfied from within Wales as was largely the case with the expansion of development and expansion of the iron industry. So the Valleys attracted people from all over, both from within Wales and also from the Forest of Dean, the West Country,… Read more »

Edeyrn
Guest
Edeyrn

Well the language died out there, because many people moving in didnt want to learn it….my valleys family include Somerset incomers…they never bothered to learn anything.

Anyway…..I welcome multi-culturalism when its genuine….not packaged up as English only culture with a few different foods………….Im an English citizen born and bred btw…but consider myself more Welsh now…

Identity is a construct and ultimately I want to help communities around me…and then firther afield……think global, ACT local

Owain
Guest
Owain

There used to be a very successful annual International Film Festival in Aberystwyth. Successful until it was relocated to Cardiff in 1998 and then dwindled into nothing. Why does everything have to be in Cardiff?

Edeyrn
Guest
Edeyrn

Da iawn…..great to see.
Hope we can make more films ABOUT Wales…..so few made 🙁

Capitalist and Welshnash
Guest
Capitalist and Welshnash

How many sons did Owain Gwynedd have? How many of them were slaughtered by each other and/or imprisoned or passed into various folklores in the fighting that followed his death in 1170? Our history provides us with material that can rival, dare I say surpass, anything in Hamlet. And we should use this to make films.

CambroUiDunlainge
Guest
CambroUiDunlainge

Northern bias alert! Lord Rhys had plenty of sons too. Most of them bastards in more ways than one!

Robert Williams
Guest
Robert Williams

To take up Owain’s point, I think the reason why the Film Festival once based in Aberystwyth moved to Cardiff was that the moving spirit, Berwyn Rowlands himself moved. There is now, of course the WOW – Wales One World – festival every spring, where an admirable selection of films from all over the world is shown in Aberystwyth, Cardiff, Swansea and possibly other venues.