The non-Welsh speaker’s guide to the National Eisteddfod

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kim erswell
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kim erswell

I have a wry smile on my face – you summed up the Prifwyl really well. I went to my first one in Wrexham 2011 with Welsh speaking friends: me with only a smattering of Gymraeg. My first impression as I entered the Maes – absolute disappointment and a feeling my £90 weekly ticket was money down the drain. I feigned enjoyment to my friends who were totally in their element. Happy to say I made my way to the learners tent and took part in the myriad of activities and felt really comfortable using my limited tongue. Days in… Read more »

Glyn Edwards
Guest
Glyn Edwards

The plural of Eisteddfod is NOT Eisteddfods! Try Eisteddfodau!!

Gethin
Guest
Gethin

Ydio otch? Claen wan ia, plismyn iaith sy’n creu ofn ar bobl i siarad y Gymraeg! A mae’r erthygl yn Saesneg i ddechra!

Petroc ap Seisyllt
Guest
Petroc ap Seisyllt

Good article, there is a need for this info; note that non Welsh speakers can and do compete in brass bands, choirs, dance teams and in support roles in theatre and other productions . Welsh is the official language of the stages and award ceremonies. It is everyones eisteddfod and I am just off there now Boderdern, Anglesey. Mwynhau!

Tal Mac
Guest
Tal Mac

There was a Spanish speaking woman in the choir for A Oes Heddwch on the opening night. She spoke no Cymraeg and no English.

It would be great to see an article about the fascinating stories of some of the people at the Eisteddfod. She could’ve been Argentine, Patagonian or Spanish – her passion for singing in Welsh was impressive.

JD
Guest
JD

Cute article but it also fails to mention that many Welsh speakers, like myself, find eisteddfodau to be quite grotesque and want nothing to do with them. I have a degree in Welsh and come from a Welsh-speaking family from an industrial area. Welsh was spoken so naturally in the house and in the community that we didn’t need to prance about on stage to show it off. The language of the brass band, bingo hall and workingmen’s club was Welsh for us and nobody we knew ever took part in an eisteddfod. At school, the ones who took part… Read more »

Tal Mac
Guest
Tal Mac

I’m not a fan of fancy costumes and pompousness either, but to say you haven’t been there in 20 years and then say it’s staid and inward looking makes you look like a bit of a thundercynt. I experienced virtual reality for the first time, raced on a virtual velodrome and practiced headers against a virtual goal. If you’re not interested in prancing about, the Urdd have sports – paddleboarding, surfing, football and rugby – I don’t think you’re a welsh speaker at all. You seem to revel in the fact the steddfod has ‘dwindling patronage’. Current welsh music acts… Read more »

Meleri Davies
Guest
Meleri Davies

Fi yn Gymro Cymraeg diolch yn fawr ac mae modd gwneud y pethau hynny tu fas i’r Eisteddfod. Os wyt ti’n mynd i alw enwau ar bobl ti wedi colli’r ddadl.

Katrin
Guest
Katrin

Great article. One question, are there any technology based competitions? For example, best mobile application, or science project. If not, would these type of competitions be helpful in widening participation?

Stuart1927
Guest
Stuart1927

Good article, except for the silly ,”For many in the Welsh speaking world the National Eisteddfod is bigger than Christmas.” bit.