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Opinion

Wales is no longer a factory for political big beasts

02 Apr 2023 6 minute read
David Lloyd George in 1932. Photo Robert Sennecke, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Theo Davies-Lewis

Isn’t it perplexing that, after a quarter century of devolution, there has been little investigation of leadership in modern Wales? All things considered, this is a country which throughout its Shakespearian trials and tribulations has remained obsessed with leaders, to the extent that the tale of Y Mab Darogan lives on after centuries in legend.

Its pertinence speaks to how the Welsh have sought to address this serious subject: in prophecies, tales and phrases.

The Welsh language’s workings are poetic enough, too, that we can apply its most prescient sayings to the concept. A fo ben bid bont, to be a leader is to be a bridge, being the most relevant for this column.

Again, in this context, what leadership means for the Welsh is clearly worthy of consideration, at the very least in political terms, and also if we look further afield.

There are particular learnings from recent analysis by Sir Anthony Seldon into what 300 years of the office of the Prime Minister has meant for the UK; exploring the characteristics of its holders and how 10 Downing Street as an institution is out-of-date for modern government.

Historians will attribute several factors to explain the change that has swept through Welsh society. I would suggest that the role of leaders cannot be underestimated. Take the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, for instance, which saw the surge of Liberalism alongside the dominance of the nonconformist movement, underpinned by the most skilful Welsh political leader in David Lloyd George.

Later in the twentieth century Welshmen (with varying degrees of nationhood) emerged at the peak of both main political parties in London.

Institutions

In one decade, the 1980s, Geoffrey Howe and Michael Heseltine in the blue corner; Neil Kinnock in the red. These were leaders often produced by the best institutions on the left and the right. Products of real-life heavy industrial experience, labour colleges, trade unions, grammar and public schools and university debating chambers in England.

Now the story is very different, with a decline of Welsh leadership in a British context. There are several reasons I would propose to explain why:

1) New Labour promoted primarily Scottish political heavyweights;

2) the institutions that created leaders of old have waned in significance, with ‘career’ politicians finding their way into seats through various avenues and connections; and

3) devolution itself shifted the nucleus of leadership from London to Cardiff Bay (of course, in many ways, how better we are for that.)

Rhodri Morgan

An MP called Rhodri Morgan’s decision to seek a seat in the Welsh Assembly rather than stay in Westminster had profound consequences for the institution’s survival in its early years.

But political big beasts are extinct in Wales. Morgan may have been the only true national leader in Wales since Lloyd George, though not in a British context, and we cannot seriously suggest that he had an heir – certainly not from the cohort of politicians that were elected in the first term of the Assembly in 1999.

Only during the pandemic did ‘leadership in a Welsh context’ seem a plausible and non-abstract concept, largely thanks to the elevated profile of the First Minister of Wales.

In recent years we have begun to understand what a brand of popular Welsh leadership looks like, one that could bring success to individuals and organisations.

There are three Cs that define this leadership style. The first of these has already been mentioned – Cymraeg – and may seem an obvious element. But it is worth emphasising that the language permeates every aspect of Welsh life, and therefore underpins the identity of successful organisations.

The frequency of hearing Welsh spoken by figures such as Mark Drakeford, and its embrace by the likes of the Football Association of Wales (FAW), has given it an international profile and transformed the language into a dynamic tool to appeal to audiences.

The other two Cs – Community and Cunning (yes, really) – require greater nuance in identification. Communitarian values do quite obviously run through Welsh society, something that is repeated by Welsh Labour frequently. The perception of being community-focused, as the First Minister was when announcing his Covid-19 rules in a timely and considered manner, was the sign of a skilful leader when, in reality, the restrictions rarely differed from England or Scotland.

This showed a political cunning and skill for communication that resonates in a Welsh context. Like the most successful brand of political leadership espoused by Welsh Labour, the FAW has been equally astute in how it has positioned itself, most vividly in governance, community and cultural terms, in stark contrast to the ‘other’ competing national sport in Wales.

The decisions taken by leaders are no accident. And while I am not suggesting an academic formula for analysing leadership, current trends in public life are there to be identified for regular observers of the machinations of decision-making.

Future leaders

Yet, I hasten to add, harnessing an appealing brand of Welsh leadership does not always deliver better policy outcomes on the political side.

Where we appear to be at present is a Wales still, after decades of building institutions since the late nineteenth century, lacking clear leaders – on an individual and institutional basis. There are notable exceptions, which espouse a distinctive flair for garnering public support and affection, but not enough to restore the national factory that once produced some of the greatest leaders in British civic society.

Which is why I propose that producing future leaders should be considered a policy issue. Though such statements are dangerous for a columnist when suddenly confronted with the political reality of what the government of the day is dealing with, it is obvious that we should benefit from additional leaders to be nurtured in Wales – even beyond politics.

There are already political issues that affect the next generation of leaders: the ‘brain drain’ of talent away from the country, the most dangerous of them. Who will fill the executive positions of businesses, public services and government, if they are not in Wales? Since the Welsh Government launched a major push on the brain drain in October 2021, updates have been few and far between.

“You don’t have to get out to get on, make your future here in Wales,” Vaughan Gething said at the time. This is a sentiment we should shout to the rafters, but does not reflect the reality faced by thousands today. But by making this statement ring true, by enhancing the possibilities of Wales for a younger generation, we would indeed be boosting our public services, economy and local communities for the future. In turn, we may be able to restore the production line of Welsh leaders this century.

This is an edited extract from Theo Davies-Lewis’ lecture, Welsh Leadership in the 21st Century, delivered in the Senedd on 23 March


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max wallis
max wallis
10 months ago

Mark Drakeford did have a claim to take on Rhodri Morgan’s mantle, but Welsh Labour has no big-hitting politician able to take over. Vaughan Gething had a good chance as Covid-minister, but Drakeford had to push him aside for incompetence (and fend off a Welsh Covid Inquiry to protect them both).As far as there was a distinctive Welsh response to Covid, it was more authoritarian and performed worse than the English one. Sadly, Wales is left with no candidate FM-in-waiting.

Mab Meirion
Mab Meirion
10 months ago
Reply to  max wallis

Interesting, take off VG and put on the Baroness in defence, a plot of MD’s without input from Westminster, quite sinister, really…Shakespeare’s unfinished ‘Welsh Play’…

Riki
Riki
10 months ago

Because we are totally fine with being the stooge Nation of the union. We have no Spine, Heart, or self respect as a people. We, for almost 500 years have been bred to believe we are an inherently lesser people. You can see this in the fact that many generations of People in Wales believed, and still believe knowing Cymraeg Holds you back.

Geoffrey Harris
Geoffrey Harris
10 months ago

Gwynfor Evans the man who changed the face of Cymru. Without him we would not have a Synedd or S4C. When you look at Cymru from an English perspective you may ignore him because he had little effect on them but, for us he was massive.

Mum in Wales
Mum in Wales
10 months ago

I am constantly amazed by my son and daughter and how politically aware, eloquent and up to date with current affairs they are. Politics since 2016 will have more of an effect on the lives of the young than anyone else and they know this. The referendum literally forged them. Their school liaises with political figures and institutions, they practice using their voice both within the school and to influential people, with a confidence that I envy. They use social media to effect change. So I am not pessimistic, about Wales, and leadership, quite the contrary . They also observe… Read more »

Rhosddu
Rhosddu
10 months ago

I assume that the reason there are no longer any significant figures in Westminster is that since devolution the locus of Welsh politics has shifted away from Westminster and towards Cardiff Bay. The question now should perhaps be: “Who have been the most influential Welsh leaders in Welsh politics, rather than British politics?”

Leigh Richards
Leigh Richards
10 months ago

If that ‘factory’ which Ben speaks of (and which ‘once produced some of the greatest leaders in British civic society’) has ceased to function then we should not mourn its passing. Wales has already had more than its share of political careerists who have seen Wales as little more than a stepping stone to power and patronage within the british state. Like Lloyd George a corrupt womaniser who forced partition on Ireland at the point of a gun. Like Neil Kinnock who saw it as his personal mission to wreck plans for the welsh people to have even a small… Read more »

Alan Jones
Alan Jones
10 months ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

Leigh, you forgot to mention George Thomas there, a champagne socialist of the worst kind. Would speak poetically of Wales (& mam) but was very disparaging to & about the people of Wales once he had his head turned by the bright lights & ” sophistication” of London & the establishment. He wasn’t the first of course & unfortunately I doubt he’ll be the last.

Leigh Richards
Leigh Richards
10 months ago
Reply to  Alan Jones

Indeed Alan a major oversight on my part im afraid – think i must have blotted all memory of the truly appalling Thomas from my memory. A more obsequious grovellor to the british crown and all its antiquated nonsense it’s hard to imagine. Think im right in saying Thomas was involved in the shameful decision by the Wilson govt to use part of the fund raised by the public after the aberfan disaster to pay for the clean up of the school site afterwards.

Mawkernewek
10 months ago
Reply to  Leigh Richards

There’s a far more efficient factory now, namely the Oxford PPE course. It doesn’t produce big beasts, but the Establishment would rather not have their politicians have too many ideas of their own.

Brechdan Wncomunco
10 months ago

Why use the picture of a famous Mancunian.

Kerry Davies
Kerry Davies
10 months ago

And so the writer considers Rishi Sunak or Dominic Raab to be political big beasts? Face facts, as long as we are shackled to the mast of a sinking UK ship of state there are no “Big Beasts”.

Rob
Rob
10 months ago

In the future Wales will have 96 Senedd members and only 32 MPs.
This will mean that up and coming politicians from all parties (especially non-Labour) will increasingly look towards the Senedd to build their careers, rather than Westminster. That may also include those the anti-devolution Tory MPs once they have lost their seats.

Karl
Karl
10 months ago

Glad, I don’t want beasts and big mouths. I want representation based on our needs, not someone’s ego. Johnson shown us th evil of ego

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