Culture

Watch: Tryweryn animated film that will be shown Cardiff International Film Festival

16 Oct 2021 2 minutes Read

 

An animated film telling the story of Tryweryn is to be screened at the Cardiff International Film Festival at the end of October.

The film by Osian Roberts, who comes from Llanerchymedd on Anglesey, has been selected to form part of the ‘Welsh Films’ category at the festival.

Osian Roberts studied an Art Foundation course at Coleg Menai, Bangor, before going on to study BA Animation at Manchester Metropolitan University.

He said that he viewed the film festival as an “opportunity to get the story out” of the drowning of Capel Celyn to a wider audience.

“I worked really hard on the film during the pandemic, and I was able to put in the hours because I was spending a lot of time in the house,” Osian Roberts told Golwg360.

“I worked on the film, the animation and so forth, on my own – and then I had someone to help me with the music.

“I’m just really proud that the film was chosen, it’s a little surreal really.”

‘Don’t know the details’

He eventually made the film as his graduate project at the School Of Art at Manchester Metropolitan University.

“The more I was in Manchester, the more I got into Welsh history, and I think I was longing for home,” he said.

“So I was researching the history of Wales, and I knew about the history of Capel Celyn history before, but I decided that this is the story I would like to make a film about.

“Everyone knows the story of Capel Celyn, but we don’t know the details, so I felt like it was really interesting to go into that.

“I decided to make this film about the history, and then ran with the idea.”

But when he discussed the film with his friends and fellow students at Manchester he realised that the history wasn’t as well known as he thought.

“Over the border in England, I noticed when I was pitching the idea at university that not many people had heard the story,” he said.

“They knew the wall, but not the story.”

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Y Cymro
Y Cymro
1 month ago

Why is it that in our schools are not taught about Tryweryn. The Infamous WelshNot campaign or the Blue Books slight among other important historical events that affected Wales throughout the ages. And sure for decades we’ve had our education system controlled by Whitehall which deliberately opted to teach an Anglocentric version of history rather than the true Welsh history. It’s called suppression. Imagine not knowing about both World Wars. The Holocaust. South African Apartheid or the Race Riots of America. These are world important events. And yes those examples are extreme but we’re often told to forget history tend… Read more »

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 month ago
Reply to  Y Cymro

Someone should make posters of the this comment, the parts referring to Wales of course, and paste them in all our towns. Paste responsibly.

Last edited 1 month ago by j humphrys
Siarl
Siarl
1 month ago
Reply to  Y Cymro

My granddaughter aged 10 saw my Cofiwch Dryweryn sticker on the back of my car and told me that she is learning about it in school. So it is being taught, although she is in a Welsh language school, I can’t be sure it’s being taught in English speaking schools.

Elizabeth Bowen
Elizabeth Bowen
1 month ago

That is such a good idea. It will help students studying second language Welsh a level. How do I get hold of the film for my son who is studying Welsh a level?
Many thanks
Liz
elizabeth.bowen2@gmail.com

HywelE3
HywelE3
1 month ago

YouTube Elizabeth – ‘Tryweryn 2D short animated film’ with the ‘Cofiwch Dryweryn’ logo.

Elizabeth Bowen
Elizabeth Bowen
1 month ago
Reply to  HywelE3

Diolch yn fawr
Liz

Welsh_Sion
Welsh_Sion
1 month ago

The film is embedded in the original article, Elizabeth. 🙂

Nathan Lewis Williams
Nathan Lewis Williams
1 month ago

On the closing of Capel Celyn Chapel, September 1963 “Na ato yr Arglwydd i mi roddi treftadaeth fy hynafiaid i ti” – 1 Brenhinoedd 21 A dam, hard hewn from hillside stone Stands tall above the softly rippling, whispering sea  That is Tryweryn Deep and black as a cwm’s last coal mine Cold and still as an empty chapel On Sunday morning For good, for worse, we closed the book –  Had to, you see. “Capel Celyn ar gau” Our chapel an “argae” But the language never mattered to us then. Through kith and kin the rock faced guardians of… Read more »

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