Culture

Welsh a worldwide model for language revitalisation say University of Waikato as they launch Cardiff partnership

10 Nov 2021 2 minutes Read
The University of Waikato

The University of Waikato in New Zealand has launched a strategic partnership with Cardiff University, saying that they consider Welsh a model for language revitalisation.

Around 149,000 people speak the Māori language in New Zealand, with 50,000 saying they speak it well, compared to 562,000 Welsh speakers according to the 2011 census.  The University of Waikato features a Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies.

“The partnership is expected to deliver enhanced opportunities for students, as well as opportunities in language and culture including language revitalisation, with the Welsh language considered a model for language revitalisation worldwide,” the University of Waikato said.

The strategic partnership was formally recognised at an online event today, with speakers including First Minister Mark Drakeford and Laura Clarke, High Commissioner of the United Kingdom to New Zealand.

University of Waikato Vice-Chancellor, Professor Neil Quigley, said that he hoped the relationship would bring world class expertise from Cardiff into Waikato and New Zealand.

“Our partnership has already shown what can be achieved through international collaboration between committed academics in a short space of time and during a global pandemic,” says Professor Quigley.

“There are many synergies between Waikato and Cardiff and this partnership is already enriching staff experience and research performance.”

‘Cultural ties’

Other topics of co-operation between the universities will include a better understanding of genomics of microbes, AI and edge computing, climate change, engineering, management, nursing, psychology, law and politics.

“This partnership builds upon and strengthens our commitment to put outward mobility and student exchange at the heart of our offering to students, while ensuring the benefits are seen and felt here in Wales,” says Cardiff University Vice-Chancellor, Professor Colin Riordan.

“As we move out of the pandemic, it is vital that we continue to provide opportunities for students and staff to collaborate with colleagues around the world.

“There are many cultural and geographical ties between Wales and New Zealand, and I’m looking forward to seeing how the partnership leads to wider research, education, and civic benefits for both countries.”

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Geoffrey ap.
Geoffrey ap.
25 days ago

I am very pleased to hear that the language struggle in Cymru is setting an example to other minority languages, but they must realise that this was hard won. Many young people put themselves up for taking action that ended in prison. Some like Dafydd Iwan were sent to prison several times, but dispute the full force of English law against them, the struggle went on. We are in the position we are now thanks to them and their dedication to the survival of our language. We owe them a great deal.

arthur owen
25 days ago
Reply to  Geoffrey ap.

All power to the people mentioned,but we must remember that really we speak one of the least put upon minority language on earth.

Geoffrey ap.
Geoffrey ap.
24 days ago
Reply to  arthur owen

What!!! When my grandfather was beaten for speaking his native young in school and Welsh speakers were ridiculed for speaking it, when it was forbidden to be spoken in courts, and other public domains, road signs in English only all public proceedings in English only, you need to reassess your opinions on what oppression means.

Rossi
Rossi
24 days ago
Reply to  Geoffrey ap.

Yeah arthur owen how dare you point out that there are masses of atrocities to ethnic minorities that happen on a daily basis around the world due to people not speaking the main language of their own county.

Last edited 24 days ago by Rossi
Penderyn
Penderyn
23 days ago
Reply to  Rossi

“ masses of atrocities to ethnic minorities that happen on a daily basis”

Name them. I don’t recall huge numbers of atrocities going on today simply because of people speaking a different language

Joe Mangan
23 days ago
Reply to  Geoffrey ap.

All credit to the Welsh people for keeping their language alive, but your post is in the past tense while arthur owen’s is in the present tense. He is probably thinking of people such as the Uighurs in China. You are surely not suggesting that Welsh speakers are in a similar position?

Pricey
Pricey
23 days ago
Reply to  arthur owen

Utterly pointless whataboutery.

Penderyn
Penderyn
23 days ago
Reply to  arthur owen

Typical English imperialist apologists…. always desperate to defend the anglo-norman supremacy.

I cant speak Welsh in public services in West Wales today and still receive monkey chants

Crwtyddol
24 days ago

I wonder what the Maori population was when the Europeans first arrived. It’s possible that it might have been around 150,000, no more. The maximum number of Welsh speakers, domiciled in Wales was probably about 1.2 million in 1912ish. 80% of the world’s languages have less than 10,000 speakers. Any initiative to improve a language’s numbers are to be encouraged, but there has to be a focus, a context. What saved Welsh was the Bible translation, and the strength of the chapels. These days, its the modern religion of the media that provides the main context for Welsh survival. In… Read more »

Welsh_Siôn
Welsh_Siôn
23 days ago
Reply to  Crwtyddol

<< Lives in Swydd Rhyd-y-Gwely.

Therefore, there are more than 1 million plus 1 Welsh speakers worldwide. 🙂

Diolch am eich dealltwriaeth.

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