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Arfon MP accuses UK Government of ‘dragging heels’ over jet ski licensing

24 Jul 2021 2 minutes Read
Hywel William MP (CC BY 3.0). Jet skier.

Plaid Cymru MP Hywel Williams, has warned that a failure to tighten jet ski regulations will result in more deaths and injuries this summer.

The MP for Arfon introduced a Private Members’ Bill in Westminster in November 2020 that would have established a licensing system for drivers of personal watercraft and created the offence of driving a jet ski without a licence.

It was in response to increasing concerns about the dangerous and irresponsible use of jet skis along the coastline of Gwynedd and Ceredigion.

Mr Williams said: “It is extremely disappointing that the UK Government have continued to drag their heels and failed to legislate in time for the summer season. This is not a matter of a minor inconvenience but a matter of public safety.

“Due to this government’s lack of action, anyone – even children as young as 12 years old – will continue to be able to use these powerful machines throughout the summer, posing a serious threat to swimmers, sailors, surfers, as well as threaten the wildlife we all enjoy along our coastline.

“The government must urgently act to end this free-for-all and introduce robust legislation to protect the public and wildlife.”

‘Assurance’

Mr Williams said that after a meeting with the Under-Secretary of State for Transport he was given an assurance that plans to tighten regulations were underway.

But recent correspondence has revealed that no timeframe has yet been set by the UK Government for the passage of legislation.

Writing to Mr Courts, Hywel Williams states: “In making the case for the legislation, I detailed the numerous examples of jet skis being driven at speed close to bathing beaches, accidental collisions with boats and near misses, the disturbing of people fishing from the shore, and incidents of jet ski drivers intruding into nature reserves.

“I am concerned that it appears as though little progress has been made in the months which have followed.”

The issue was highlighted by wildlife TV presenter Iolo Williams earlier this month when he posted footage of jet skiers driving into seabirds in Afon Conwy:

The UK Government has said that it’s planning to start a consultation on new legislation that would strengthen existing enforcement powers held by local, harbour and police authorities.

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Quornby
Quornby
2 months ago

Another “consultation” taking a decade and a £million in expenses no doubt. The birds are protected by law…. so enforce the law.

Chris
Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Quornby

Are there any specific laws against floating docking great logs in oceans and lakes where they might inadvertently act as sort of marine speed bump, in places where this bro-dude douchebaggery is popular? We might of course have to cross our fingers that none accidentally get sunk though. But hey, if it became a problem perhaps they could legislate it

Last edited 2 months ago by Chris
Ed W.
Ed W.
2 months ago
Reply to  Chris

Please enlighten us with such profound logic?

Chris
Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  Ed W.

I can’t dumb it down any further for you, sorry.

Petha Del
Petha Del
2 months ago
Reply to  Chris

English comprehension not your strong point then. I’m sure he didn’t mean to embarrass you.

David
David
2 months ago

Are the County Councils able to make a Bye-Laws?

Ed W.
Ed W.
2 months ago

Tried taking ‘peaceful’ beach walk along Morfa Harlech two days on the trot last week. The jet ski engine noises were a right pain…. They were at Morfa Bychan (Black Rocks to the unwashed)… across the bay. And while I’m on a rant, since when is a jet ski full throttle allowed to navigate the Glaslyn all the way up to Porthmadog? Don’t Gwynedd Council have their own version of Bay watch supposedly? Or am I confusing them with the Simpsons. .

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