Support our Nation today - please donate here
News

England could ‘learn lessons’ from Welsh Government on second homes ‘catastrophe’ says Cumbrian MP

08 Jan 2022 4 minutes Read
Tim Farron. Picture by Richard Townshend (CC BY 3.0). Right, Demonstration in Nefyn on Saturday, May 1 against the rising issue of second home ownership in the area. By Sion Bryn Evans.

England could “learn lessons” from the way the action the Welsh Government is taking against second homes in Wales, a Cumbrian MP has said.

Tim Farron, a former leader of the Liberal Democrats, represents a coastal rural community in the county in the north-west of England.

Leading a debate in the House of Commons on second homes and holiday lets, he said that the housing crisis which had been in development for decades “has rapidly become a catastrophe during the two years of the pandemic”.

“There are things that the Welsh Government could do, and there are some things that they are already doing that the UK Government are not doing—we could learn some lessons from them,” Tim Farron said.

“The Government could follow the lead of the Welsh Government and give councils the power to increase council tax by up to 100% on second homes in the worst-affected communities.

“That would serve to protect those communities and generate significant revenue that could then be ploughed back into their threatened schools and into new affordable housing for local families.

“A quick assessment shows that, in Coniston alone, that would raise £750,000 a year, which would make a colossal difference to that community.”

He added that many rural Conservative MPs secretly agreed that the impact of second homes on their communities was damaging.

“There is a kind of private agreement that this is a catastrophe. They see it in their own constituencies: the collapse of affordable, available housing for local communities is killing towns and villages in Cornwall, Northumberland, Shropshire, Devon, Somerset, North Yorkshire, the highlands of Scotland and rural Wales, as well as in my home of Cumbria,” he said.

Action to alleviate the housing crisis in Wales is being trialled by the Welsh Government in Gwynedd this month. They have also been consulting on higher council taxes on second homes, or new restrictions on registering homes as businesses.

‘Heritage’

A Labour MP, Matthew Pennycook of Greenwich and Woolwich, also said that the UK Government could look across the border at what measures were being taken in Wales,

“There is a strong case for exploring whether the Government should provide local authorities with powers to, for example, introduce licensing regimes for second homes and short-term lets, and for considering giving them even greater discretion over their council tax regimes,” he said.

“Perhaps allowing local authorities, as Labour has done in Wales, to levy a premium or surcharge on second homes and long-term empty properties if they believe that that is required in their locality.”

Conservative Aberconwy MP Robin Millar however called on Tim Farron to be careful that he did not punish those who wanted to keep a hold on homes that had been passed down through the family.

“My own constituency, Aberconwy in north Wales, has this problem—not to the extent that the honourable Member describes, but certainly smaller villages are particularly vulnerable to high levels of second homeownership,” he said.

“However, I wonder what he has to say about the example given to me of a farmer whose family had lived in one valley, Penmachno, for many years. He himself had to move away to find other work, so he now has a second home—his family home—in Penmachno, but he must live in England.

“In that circumstance, there is a second home in the village that is not occupied, but there is a tradition and a family heritage in that village. Should that person then have to give up that home?”


Support our Nation today

For the price of a cup of coffee a month you can help us create an independent, not-for-profit, national news service for the people of Wales, by the people of Wales.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
9 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Erisian
Erisian
5 months ago

No, really it couldn’t. England is unable to learn lessons from anybody, anywhere, anytime because they already think they know better. After all it used to be a mighty (nasty) kleptomanic empire.

Richard
Richard
5 months ago
Reply to  Erisian

Tims South Cumbrian patch is a 90 min drive for many of us on the northern Wales coast – and this land of the Mabinogion where our language was once spoken and lingers in the place names is what will happen to us if we do not act on second homes.

The locals are so admiring of ours and the Cornish struggle and to be fair my friend

Dim problem
Dim problem
5 months ago
Reply to  Erisian

In real life, most English aren’t nearly as bad as the weird, twisted image you have in your head.

hdavies15
hdavies15
5 months ago

Bit disingenuous of Robin Millar to cite the example of a farmer from Machno forced by circumstances to work and live in England. Perhaps he should reflect on why that happened in the first place rather than use it as an excuse for the general pattern of second home ownership.

Ernie The Smallholder
Ernie The Smallholder
5 months ago
Reply to  hdavies15

It is sad that this farmer has had to take a job in England.
Possibly because of the damage to the Welsh farming industry inflicted by his UK government decision to leave the European Single Market.
An issue that Wales had no option on the issue.

Dim problem
Dim problem
5 months ago
Reply to  hdavies15

Hi hdavies15 – how’s your rented-out second home doing?

Steve Duggan
Steve Duggan
5 months ago

The UK government is reluctant to put restrictions on second home ownership because – many of them own second homes themselves. It’s common with the privileged, those with money. The average person does not own a second home. The conservative party, being the party of the well off, is bound to drag it’s heals on restricting ownership or making people who own a second house pay more.

Peter Cuthbert
Peter Cuthbert
5 months ago
Reply to  Steve Duggan

Let us be cheerful. Hearing that Tim Farron has said positive things about Wales does make a nice change from all the Tory (unfounded) criticism of Wales and all things Welsh.

Crwtyddol
Crwtyddol
5 months ago

“He himself had to move away to find other work, so he now has a second home—his family home—in Penmachno, but he must live in England”.
This can sometimes be the case, but it is very much a minority and insufficient to alter the basic principle of the requirement for some control.

Our Supporters

All information provided to Nation.Cymru will be handled sensitively and within the boundaries of the Data Protection Act 2018.