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Johnson says Turkish cardboard company will take over Welsh newspaper mill as circulations fall

19 Oct 2021 2 minutes Read
UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Picture by Annika Haas (CC BY 2.0). UPM Shotton Paper Mill, right.

Boris Johnson has announced the Turkish takeover of a paper mill in Wales before a global investment summit in London today designed to one-up the President of France.

Eren Paper, owned by Turkey’s Eren Holding, is investing £500 million to buy a mill in Shotton to produce cardboard from paper waste.

Eren Holdings agreed to acquire the paper mill from Finnish firm UPM who said in September it would permanently close paper production at its Shotton newsprint site.

The site was founded in 1983 and at its height employed around 530 people, but the decline in newspaper circulation pushed the Finnish firm to sell the site.

Eren Paper will now begin work pivoting the site from newsprint to tissue and cardboard. The mill will be powered by biomass fuel and the investment is expected to create around 300 new jobs.

Boris Johnson made the announcement while pointing to £10 billion of overseas investment in Britain as part of a business summit in which nearly 200 business leaders, including Bill Gates, will network with ministers and attend a reception with the Queen at Windsor Castle.

Ministers briefed the Times that the total investment as part of the announcement was designed to beat the £3 billion of deals announced by President Macron at his annual “Choose France” networking event.

‘Massive potential’

Boris Johnson also announced that Budweiser Brewing Group, the UK arm of global brewer AB InBev, and Protium, the UK-based green hydrogen energy services company, have teamed up to deploy zero emission green hydrogen at the Magor brewery in Wales, one of the largest breweries in the UK.

They will invest more than £100m for a hydrogen generation system that will fuel the brewery’s production and also its key logistics assets, including heavy goods vehicles and forklift trucks.

Boris Johnson said: “The world’s top investors have seen the massive potential in the UK for growth and innovation in the industries of the future. The fantastic £9.7 billion of new investment we have secured today will power our economic recovery, creating thousands of jobs and helping to level up across the country.

“This is just the start. We will see new partnerships for green growth forged at today’s Global Investment Summit, as we look ahead to COP26 and beyond.”

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Jeff33
Jeff33
1 month ago

£10 billion. What happened to Truss’ £2 trillion?
What happened to £350,000,000 for NHS?
What happened to fisheries?
What happened to no reduction in food standards?
What happened to no increases in taxation?
What happened to the jobs to replace the 340,000 jobs lost to Brexile (Jan 2020)?
What happened to 20 new hospitals?
What happened to the 50,000 new nurses?
More meaningless Big number from King of Puff.

Quornby
Quornby
1 month ago

We haven’t been ripped off say rip off victims.

Reginald Bowler
Reginald Bowler
1 month ago

Pity there wasn’t a UK candidate to take it over.

Wrexhamian
Wrexhamian
1 month ago

Pity there wasn’t a Welsh candidate to take it over.

Llwynog Abertawe
Llwynog Abertawe
1 month ago

Unfortunate to see this happen, I had plans to make a newspaper for my college.
Are there any other paper mills in Wales??

Euro
Euro
1 month ago

Any coincidence that Boris Johnson is the grandson of Ali Kemal, who was a Turkish politician. Ali Kemal became the Secretary of Education on March 4, 1919 and later, the Secretary of Interior in May during the same year. Keep it in the family or give it to your friends seem to be the creed!

David Thomas
David Thomas
1 month ago

We shouldn’t be doing any business with turkey while erdogan the ottoman is in power and still bombing assyrians and yazedis in northern Syria.

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