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UK Gov should consider ‘bringing England into line’ with Covid restrictions in Wales, says Times

25 Oct 2021 3 minutes Read
Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) in yesterday’s speech broadcast on BBC One. Mark Drakeford (right), picture by the Welsh Government.

The UK Government should consider “bringing England into line” with Covid restrictions in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland in order to show that they are taking rising case rates seriously, the Times newspaper has said.

In an editorial, the newspaper said that many members of the public in England were acting as if the pandemic was over, due to a lack of UK Government urgency in communicating the seriousness of the situation.

The Times aid that the UK Government’s response was “confused” and was displaying “the same muddle that marked its initial handling of the pandemic”.

They noted that the NHS Confederation and the British Medical Association had added their support for the “rapid deployment” of new restrictions.

“Plan B would make face coverings compulsory again, would require a return to home working, introduce mandatory Covid passports and step up the urgent message to the public that they needed to behave more cautiously,” the Times said.

“It would, in effect, bring England into line with restrictions in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

“With case numbers now topping 50,000 a day, the government needs to take Covid more seriously and to communicate with greater clarity.”

‘Bulk’

The UK Labour Party has already called on the UK Government to move to Plan B to tackle the rise in Covid cases.

However, the Times noted that the main problem was that “whatever plan is supposed to be in force at the moment, it seems to have no authority”.

“Under existing regulations, booster jabs are being offered to the most vulnerable, a single dose to 12 to 15-year-olds and efforts are being redoubled to persuade a reluctant and stubborn minority to get themselves vaccinated,” they said.

“Masks should still be worn in shops, on transport and in crowded places and people should limit their attendance at large public gatherings.

“Virtually none of this is happening, at least in England, where the bulk of the population lives.”

The next steps for Wales’ Covid restrictions are due to be announced this Friday, October 29.

Wales currently has the second highest Covid infection rate in Europe and the fourth highest in the world.

Last week, Mark Drakeford said that the rising cases were “worrying” but “dramatic actions” weren’t yet needed.

However, he did suggest that masks and Covid passes might have to be brought in in more settings.

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Gareth
Gareth
1 month ago

When displaying a blatant disregard for the people of England, the UK Gov put industry and commerce before the health of its people, and not for the first time in the pandemic, it shows how we in our country would be treated if it were not for the Senedd and parliament in Cardiff. It shows how out of touch they are, when English medical bodies and media want them to follow the Celtic nations.

Huw Davies
Huw Davies
1 month ago
Reply to  Gareth

As Woody Allen said ‘Money isn’t everything;but it’s better than having your health’. Something on those lines, anyway!

Phil
Phil
1 month ago

But sadly Wales currently has a higher infection rate than England, a higher hospitalisation rate and the highest per head mortality rate in the UK.

Gareth
Gareth
1 month ago
Reply to  Phil

Doing something as we are, must be better than doing nothing, which is Boris ‘s way of thinking. How long before they overtake us , as medical opinion in England want to follow our lead.

Rob
Rob
1 month ago

Funny how people accuse Mark Drakeford of implementing policies just to be different to England, yet the reality is England is being different to everyone else.

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 month ago
Reply to  Rob

Fog in the channel………….Continent cut off.

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