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Welsh minister proposes transport alliance with Scotland and Northern Ireland

14 Aug 2021 3 minutes Read
Lee Waters MS and flags of Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Welsh Government minister Lee Waters has suggested that Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland should form a transport alliance that excludes England.

The Deputy Minister for Climate Change says the devolved nations have more in common with each other on policy than they do the Department for Transport in England.

He said that the UK Government’s transport and climate approach ‘lacks coherence and credibility’ and criticised Transport Secretary Grant Shapps for a belief in technology solutions and ‘hyper mobility’.

Speaking to Local Transport Today, he said: “We have far more in common with each other than we have in common with the Department for Transport in England, increasingly.

“We have quarterly meetings. We’re looking at commissioning some joint work together, studies on remote working for example.

“I think there’s a lot of potential for an alliance of devolved governments to develop a coherent transport policy, given that the DfT seems off on its own, ignoring the tough choices the climate change targets present to us all.”

‘Freeze’

One of the tough choices recently made by the Welsh Government has been putting a freeze on existing road schemes, pending an assessment by the Roads Review Panel.

The Llanelli MS said that it’s more than a temporary block on existing projects and it could mean the ‘end of the road’ for any future bypasses.

“The real importance of the roads review is not for schemes currently on blocks, it’s for all future road schemes. That’s where I think its potential radicalness lies”, he states.

“We could be seeing the last batch of bypasses, depending what the panel recommends. If they come forward with a set of proposals that ‘in future, we don’t think a blanket approach to congestion in towns is to build a bypass’, that would be a significant departure.”

20mph

Lee Waters also talks about the battle to win ‘hearts and minds’ over the move to make 20mph speed limits the national default for built-up areas.

The Welsh Government is currently carrying out a consultation on the change with a target to implement the reduced limits by April 2023.

He said: “This is not going to be a big bang approach. I don’t expect us to achieve 20mph straight away. It will be a process over time of changing behaviours”.

He said that speed cameras and imposing fines were unlikely to prove effective and suggests more long term approaches.

One idea proposed is for public sector vehicles to start observing the strict 20mph limit so they act as ‘pace cars’, causing a ‘ripple effect’ on traffic speeds.

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Cath
Cath
1 month ago

Oh yes indeed!….and we need to talk about many more things with Ireland and Scotland.

Welsh_Sion
Welsh_Sion
1 month ago

“One of the tough choices recently made by the Welsh Government has been putting a freeze on existing roach schemes …”

_______________

Well done, WG! Credit where it’s due and putting a kerb [sic.] on those pesky insects!

Welsh_Sion
Welsh_Sion
1 month ago
Reply to  Welsh_Sion
Alan Reilly 1
Alan Reilly 1
1 month ago

So Waters’ great plan for removing Wales and Scotland from English domination in transport is to copper fasten it in part of Ireland. 🙄

Incidentally, whilst the saltire and the dragon are the national flags of Scotland and Wales and worthy of respect as such, the sectarian abomination of a rag which makes up the fourth quarter of the image hasn’t been an officially recognised banner since 1973.

This is the flag of Ulster… https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Ulster

Last edited 1 month ago by Alan Reilly 1
defaid
defaid
1 month ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly 1

I don’t understand what you’re driving at (sorry…)

The article’s first sentence says “Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland”. I imagine that south of the border there’s already a policy that excludes England. So copper fastening what into which part?

You’re on the nail about that bloody flag though.

hdavies15
hdavies15
1 month ago
Reply to  defaid

I thought the Red Hand predated the creation of Northern Ireland as it was the traditional symbol of the old rulers of Ulster way back, possibly Tudor era or before. If that’s the case then surely the goal should be to reclaim it rather than denounce it, after all Ulster is as important apart of Irish history as Gwynedd is to Wales

defaid
defaid
1 month ago
Reply to  hdavies15

The red hand is on the Flag of Ulster. Follow Alan’s link.

It’s the crown and the St George’s cross in the background of the banner in the illustration at the top of this page that’s offensive.

Last edited 1 month ago by defaid
Alan Reilly 1
Alan Reilly 1
1 month ago
Reply to  defaid

Precisely. The red hand of Ulster first appeared during pagan times. It is as much a part of Irish history and heritage as it is, in its bastardised form, in Loyalist kkkulture. Off the top of my head, five of the nine (including two in the 26 counties) counties of Ulster use it in their GAA badge for example. The flag above though (in this article) is used to demarcate territory as “not being (for the) Irish” despite being in Ireland, i.e. WASP territory. It’s sectarian and belongs in the dustbin of history.

Hannergylch
Hannergylch
1 month ago
Reply to  defaid

The red hand on its own represents the nine counties of Ulster. The combination of red hand and crown represents the six counties of Northern Ireland. It’s complicated…

Alan Reilly 1
Alan Reilly 1
1 month ago
Reply to  hdavies15

It is, which is why anyone with an interest in freedom for Wales and Scotland should by nature be for a united and entirely free Ireland.

26 + 6 = 1

Jamie
Jamie
1 month ago
Reply to  hdavies15

The flag has been changed in the article since the comment you are replying too.

Alan Reilly 1
Alan Reilly 1
1 month ago
Reply to  defaid

Any move which helps the artificial Six County statelet to develop and progress aids the continuation of its existence in its current format. Anyone who is pro-Welsh or pro-Scottish independence should view the occupation of the six northeastern counties of Ireland in the same light as the continued colonisation of their own proud countries. In short, links should be fostered between 🇮🇪🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 with a view to gaining full independence for each one. Yes, there is full independence in the 26 counties but every effort should be made to ensure the 6 counties continue to malfunction, or at least function badly,… Read more »

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 month ago
Reply to  Alan Reilly 1

Alan, (sorry to go slightly off topic) when a child at seaside, i could buy a group of paper flags for sand castles, the coolest of which was emerald green with gold harp. Obviously Irish, but what did that represent?

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 month ago
Reply to  j humphrys

Found it. One of the provinces.

Ewan Allan MacGregor Scott
Ewan Allan MacGregor Scott
1 month ago

20mph in urban areas will bring traffic and business to a halt. It is also decidedly fuel inefficient in a patrol/ diesel vehicle. 20mph means driving in third or even second gear. The safety gain over 30mph is minimal. Why not just demand that all urban reaffic is banned, or that we revert to horse and cart.

Shan Morgain
1 month ago

The safety gain of 20mph is significant. At 30 mph a collision with a pedestrian, kills, and especially children. At 20mph a collision causes injury but rarely death. This is particularly true for vehicles with high bonnets. Older, lower cars, a child will slide over and fall off. On a higher bonnet the child cannot do that and takes the full impact.

Dai Hawkins
Dai Hawkins
1 month ago

Ewan Allan MacGregor Scott

Lowering the limit from 30 to 20 mph, lowers injuries fatalities by about 20%. The percentages of RTI’s are on the way down anyway, but if it was your child who was killed by a car travelling at 30 mph, that might affect your perspective somewhat.

Welsh_Sion
Welsh_Sion
1 month ago
Reply to  Dai Hawkins

Helo eto yr hen frawd, ers slawer dydd! 🙂

Shan Morgain
1 month ago

Nice one. Speaking to Local Transport Today, he said: “We [Wales, Scotland, N. Ireland] have far more in common with each other than we have in common with the Department for Transport in England, increasingly. This is Celtic Federation talk. Softly softly. Quarterly meetings on transport. Next quarterly meetings on trade. Next health, education, finance. No fanfare, no announcement of a Celtic Federation so no panicky English reactions. Just building it quietly step by step. Then one day oh well there are all these joint meetings gong on so a shared secretariat would be efficient to coordinate dates, meeting resources, joint… Read more »

Jonathan Edwards
Jonathan Edwards
1 month ago
Reply to  Shan Morgain

Spot on, Shan. This is the value of the proposal. I was struggling to see any other value. Hard to see a road to Scotland/Ireland bypassing England, or train lines! Shipping would be different, the sea does connects us, and free us. But sadly Wales has a very poor record in getting maritime going. We’ve lost the skills, and seed shipping companies I fear.

Kerry Davies
Kerry Davies
1 month ago

They need research into this 20 mph limit before it is implemented. Last year in the UK there were 1,472 road fatalities very few of whom were pedestrians in residential roads. Cutting speeds with a blanket ban will cause higher pollution which kills 5,000 a year nearly all in residential areas.
It will be a great idea when cars are electric but having been knocked over twice by the silent menace of thesneaky Prius that too needs research.

Llywelyn ein Llyw Nesaf
Llywelyn ein Llyw Nesaf
1 month ago

“He said that speed cameras and imposing fines were unlikely to prove effective and suggests more long term approaches.”

But aren’t speeding fines a matter for the police? Who are run from London?

So I think we can expect draconian fines for anyone doing 23mph in a deserted urban street

Egon Krenz
Egon Krenz
1 month ago

Feed the Union and the Union will feed you.

Floreat Regina, Floreat Etona

Cynan
Cynan
1 month ago
Reply to  Egon Krenz

Come now. We all know THAT’s not true. Feed the Union and the union will take more, then betray you at your moment of most needs.

j humphrys
j humphrys
1 month ago
Reply to  Cynan

Egon bitter ‘cos women laughed at his Trabant. Good for 20 kph, though.

Cai Wogan Jones
Cai Wogan Jones
1 month ago

We have more in common with Ireland (Republic) than the northern entity.

Cai Wogan Jones
Cai Wogan Jones
1 month ago

Get the Minister a map! Wales plainly has far more in common with the 26 counties of Ireland (Republic) than the 6 counties of the North.

Dave
Dave
1 month ago

Towns around Edinburgh have 20mph limits, and it seems accepted. Also here in N Wales, motorists are very considerate. I don’t think there will be too many against it. It may or may not be common elsewhere in Scotland, I’ve only visited Edinburgh recently. Any consultation should visit such towns

John Watson
John Watson
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave

It is all over Scotland.

Ernie The Smallholder
Ernie The Smallholder
1 month ago

Good idea, providing we ultimately can decide our own transport policy based on Welsh needs.
Wales can also join a free trading and customs union with Scotland and the whole of Ireland….. Then with Benelux and the rest of Europe. Now that will be good idea.
We can sell our farming produce to Europe without tariffs.

Actually there is already such a union: The European Union.
England and the UK regime just left it in 2020 !

We will just need to leave the centralised UK system become independent then we can decide our own future.

(Dr) Pedr Jarvis
(Dr) Pedr Jarvis
11 days ago

Why not include the Republic of Ireland?

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